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Which beverage/food combination seems the most necessary pairing?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Which food, if not served with it's 'proper' beverage, seems the most flat, and the taste profile most negatively impacted unless it's included?

post #2 of 13

 

Good Morning,

 

Wine and beverage pairing with food is extraordinairely subjective ... There is NO simple answer to your statements. Asparagus ( green or white varieties ), artichokes, as well as desserts or meat, fish or poultry or game, have wines that go better than others, however, it is much wider a matching game ...

 

It is personal taste involved too ... However, there are some tried and true matches from specialists in the field. A Sauvignon Blanc does pair lovely with white firm fish varieties ... and a 100% crianza Tempranillo Spanish red grape variety wine with milk fed baby lamb ... TAPAS or MEZE tend to pair with most young wines, and / or Sherry or the national liquors of a specific country, ouzo in Greece for example ... Ricard in France for another.

 

Eggs are catch 22. Depending on the filling, style or type ...

 

Many wineries and wine shops offer a Free Basic Wine tasting course at their premises from wine specialists and winery owners. Wineries as well.

 

Thanks for posting,

Margcata.

post #3 of 13

As someone who used to be in the wine trade, and as someone who loves food and wine, I can offer some suggestions.  First of all, I completely agree with Margcata.  There are some simple, sensible rules that are soundly based and should usually be followed, but, as Margcata said, there is also personal taste.  Only in a very few cases will an "off" pairing make you wish you had chosen water.  For instance, most people agree that red wine and asparagus causes the wine to taste metallic or rather strange.  It's also difficult to make a good match with eggs.  The basic rule is white wine with fish and white meat, and red wine with red meat.  You won't go wrong with this rule, but there certainly are exceptions to it.  Many people, for example, prefer a young red wine with salmon.  And you certainly can serve red wine with white meat (e.g., chicken, turkey, pork).  The most common criticism of this rule is that it is too simple and too confining. 

 

There are many considerations other than red wine vs. white wine, of course.  You would not break out an old First Growth Bordeaux for a barbecue or burgers, but it would be perfect with a chateaubriand or a rack of lamb.  In other words, match the wine to the occasion, not just to the type of food.  Also you should consider the season.  I think of Chateauneuf-du-Pap, Barolo, and Barbaresco, as winter wines.  In the heat of Summer I like young, zesty reds like Beaujolais, Dolcetto, etc.  It's also helpful to look at what pairings are considered traditional in the wine regions you are choosing from.  The wines from the Southwest of France tend to go nicely with the food of that region (Cahors with cassoulet, for instance), and the same is true of Alsace in France, or Tuscany in Italy, and so on.

 

Usually there are many choices for a given dish, and it's fun to explore.  But you need knowledge.  Learn the characteristics of various wines and foods and you will eventually choose almost intuitively.  A big, buttery, rich chardonnay goes nicely with rich lobster.  A young, fruity Beaujolais is a great match for sausage and lentils, as the acid content and fruitiness of the wine "cuts" the richness of the sausage.  What I'm saying here is that sometimes you want to match the flavors and sometimes you want to contrast the flavors.

 

Look for books written by Hugh Johnson.  Also, I recommend you look for a book titled "Wine With Food" by Joanna Simon.

 

Cheers,

Sal

 

 

post #4 of 13

Good Morning,

 

With the spring season enroute,

wines, sparkling wines, punches,

tropical fruit blends with wine, are making

their way onto the table.

 

Noble nosed aged reds, can be

heavy and awkard with light spring and summer dishes.

 

Sparkling wines, rosé or white,

are lovely this time of year, and pair

wonderfully with most light seasonal salads, fish, shellfish and seafood.

 

With reds, one can blend a young light red with sparkling water, club soda, and / or fresh tropical fruit juices with a liquor of choice ... to create a sort of Sangría type cocktail or Mimosa.

 

Though I am an avid red wine aficionada, during the green season and summertime, I turn to whites, especially Albariño grape varieties from Galicia, and Portugal and Prosecco or Cava ...

 

Good post.

Thanks.

Margcata

 

 

 

post #5 of 13

OK. This is a cool thread. First off I'll make simple points: Don't cook with wines or beers that you wouldn't drink on their own. Don't drink nice wines/beers out of coffee cups or water glasses. If you've got no experience, don't spend yourself out of the game. Enjoy yourself. If done right, you can learn on the cheap side for fun even if you make mistakes. 

 

In pairing I like to match by size of flavor. Big giant food flavors need matching beverage choices. My BBQ ribs will kill a lot of wines. It takes a really big in-your-face-over-the-top-sledgehammer red to go well, such as California Zinfandel or Australian Shiraz. Those same wines would wipe out all the subtleties of my pan-seared duck breast, which gets paired with an equally subtle Pinot Noir. It's OK to disagree with my wine choices, the point is "big" vs "subtle" flavors. The same goes with beer, but I'm not as well versed. 

 

Go out and find yourself a good Local Wine Store (LWS) that has regular (free) tastings. I've got at least four(4) stores within a five(5) mile radius of my home every Saturday. You can taste for free, and the sample bottles are almost always on sale. LOL. Try-Before-You-Buy. Every good manager that I know knows the regular customers, and takes care of them properly. It aint'e rocket surgery.      

 

I hope this all helps.

 

 

* Forget asparagus and/or artichokes, it just aint'e worth the fight. That's what iced-tea was made for.

post #6 of 13

@ Iceman,

 

Always a pleasure to see you online and read your suggestions ... This has been  a cool post  ...

 

I must say, that I am in agreement on all 3 counts:

 

1) I never drink what I would NOT cook with ...

 

2) I am also in agreement on the smoked ducklings with Pinot Noir ... gorgeous pairing.

 

3) I personally have to repeat myself that I, find wine and food pairing very subjective even though there are some set points of knowledge ...

 

I have had White Navarran Asparagus Sautéed in Olive Oil with Prosecco and with Cava Sparkling wines and have found it very lovely ... and the Green stalk variety, as well which is in season now ...

 

When I have roasted milk fed baby lamb, I normally like a 100% Tempranillo Grape Variety from Ribera del Duero or a Catalan Priorat from Falset, Tarragona ... or a La Rioja traditionally produced red. I also am very fond of Malbec bottlings from Argentina. Have you tried any lately ?

 

What do you serve with baby roast lamb ?

 

 

Oh yes, how right you are --- a fine wine shop, and a good manager, shall give you a real education in wines and food pairing, and wine in general.

 

Thanks.

Ciao. Margaux Cintrano

( Margcata )  

post #7 of 13

For me i think the best is, beef and wine. Perfect.

post #8 of 13

Nathadale,

 

I too, enjoy beef with a good red wine ... I would not truly appreciate a steak for example with a white wine. However, I have had Steak Taratr with an aged Jerez at a vanguard tapas establishment and it was a lovely pair.

 

Steak: I do prefer however, a noble aged crianza Malbec Argentinian wine or Ribera del Duero, Spanish or a good Piemonte Barolo or Tuscan or Abruzzi Sangiovese red or a Bordeaux 2003.

 

Have nice wkend.

Margcata

post #9 of 13

Margcata my friend, I've never made "baby roast lamb". I kinda feel like they are brothers of veal, sorta. I don't do veal. However, with my regular lamb, which usually are seasoned relatively heavily, I would serve something bigger and full of fruit, but not overpowering; a solid Malbec or Carménère maybe. 

 

 

 

* OK. It's been brought to my attention vocabulary-wise, that lambs are baby sheep. Adults are then called mutton. I did know that, but never really thought about it much. I don't remember ever going to the store and buying mutton, so I guess I must not really have any problem with the said "baby lamb". I guess again, that my problem only comes with the word "baby". It seems as though I'm a hypocrite. As long as things are labeled to my liking and acceptance, it's okey-doakey. I think that if I had any exposure to lamb factory-farms I would probably not do lamb either. 


Edited by IceMan - 5/6/12 at 1:02pm
post #10 of 13

I'd eat a baby lamb.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

 

 

 

 

* OK. It's been brought to my attention vocabulary-wise, that lambs are baby sheep. Adults are then called mutton. I did know that, but never really thought about it much. I don't remember ever going to the store and buying mutton, so I guess I must not really have any problem with the said "baby lamb". I guess again, that my problem only comes with the word "baby". It seems as though I'm a hypocrite. As long as things are labeled to my liking and acceptance, it's okey-doakey. I think that if I had any exposure to lamb factory-farms I would probably not do lamb either. 

Lambs are young sheep, but truly baby sheep are generally  labeled as spring lamb.   Its a small distinction but it may help you sleep at night :p

post #12 of 13
Most important pairing: Hot dogs and beer.

Leave the sheep alone, you're not fooling anyone.

Baaa,
BDL
post #13 of 13

Iceman : Milk fed baby lamb or older aged lamb, pairs wonderfully with Toro, Zamora, Spain Designation of Origin Wines for example; Dos Mauros, authored by Oenoloigst Mariano García, who is the original creator of Vega Sicilia. I also like Tuscan reds & Abruzzi reds or Piamonte reds with lamb,

 

Boar: I have to agree with the beer & hot dogs or grilled sausage veal or pork sold on streets in Switzerland and Bratwürst etectra of this genre of würsts.

 

Have nice wkend.

Margaux.

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