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Osmazome

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

 

 

I read an article the other day and it used the term, 'Osmazome'. So I did some research on it and found this so far:

 

That osmazome is the soluble part of the meat that dissolves in boiling water and which makes for a nutritious broth, gives it taste, ordor, etc.

 

Is it true that it is only found in red meat, adult animals ? Is it true that chicken , lamb, suckling pig, veal do not contain osmazome ? ( found in the Hand-book of practical cookery )  In essence, what is it exactly ?

 

I would be glad to get your thoughts on this topic.

 

Petals.

 

 

 

 

Petals
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Served Up
(165 photos)
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 6

Never heard of it before. Playing around with google it seems like it might be an older concept that has fallen out of fashion with newer insights into the specifics. Sort of like how people don't die of old age any more. Now we know specifically what killed them even if it was from age-related problems.

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=DmEDa9wG6yUC&pg=PA59&lpg=PA59&dq=harold+mcgee+osmazome&source=bl&ots=zBxbKA4ri1&sig=C6O2BkpjN9HhVRObOKitasE0fr8&hl=en&sa=X&ei=sR1iT4elDqKhiQKvu734CA&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=harold%20mcgee%20osmazome&f=false

 

Gives a little of that background and with some Harold McGee insights. Apparently, Chapter 16 of his The Curious Cook is where that discussion is taken and is about the history of the chemistry of cooking, http://curiouscook.typepad.com/site/the-curious-cook-more-kitchen-science-lore.html  I've not read that one.

 

From Wikipedia

 

Quote:
Marie-Antoine Carême (1784–1833): The concept of molecular gastronomy was perhaps presaged by Marie-Antoine Carême, one of the most famous French chefs, who said in the early 19th century that when making a food stock "the broth must come to a boil very slowly, otherwise the albumin coagulates, hardens; the water, not having time to penetrate the meat, prevents the gelatinous part of the osmazome from detaching itself."

 

I think it's clear that this technique is desirable but there are many flavor compounds influenced, not just one.

 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 6

Fortunately our knowledge of food chemistry and techniques of stock-making have evolved since Careme.  However, the larger ideas that good stocks usually take time and do better at a simmer than at a boil were well taken then and are still.

 

BDL

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thank you both for your thoughts.

 

Yes, I totally agree with you. What is going on in food and chemistry these days is just incredible. The best tasting stocks I have made were almost always done 3-4 hours simmered.

 

If I am to understand the word right, it was mainly because of the beef and what was extracted from it that this word was derived.

 

Interesting statement , " Chemically, the single substance was almost immediately replaced by the idea of numerous flavour compounds - at least 600 in cooked beef. "

 

So that word I presume can only apply to red meat.

 

The Dictionary reference said,  " A substance formerly supposed to give soup and broth their characteristic odor, and probably consisting of one or serveral of the class of nitrogenous substances which are called extractives. "

 

The key word might be just that , 'extractives'.

 

When I think about how the word was derived ( the two words in Greek) , its amazing how back then , they had such a keen desire to comprehend the depth of making stock to the point of giving it this name.

 

They were chemists.......

 

Petals.

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 6

The term Ozmazome was used by Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826) who was born before Careme, and it seemd to refer to the savoury taste which was named by  Kikunae Ikeda in 1908 as umami.

 

Umamni (the fifth taste) only became formally recognised in 1985 (It can be described as a pleasant "brothy" or "meaty" taste with a long lasting, mouthwatering and coating sensation over the tongue).

 

So the umami consept was presaged by Brillat-Savarin some 84 years before Ikeda, which returns the French to the top of the Gastronomic tree

post #6 of 6

It is mentioned a few times, with a definition, in Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management, which used to be the main textbook of girls studying Domestic Science at school years ago. I think you can download it free from Project Gutenberg.

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