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Jarrod's Chicken Parma

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

x


Edited by tasunkawitko - 9/18/12 at 6:51pm

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post #2 of 12

Looks good.

 

I've seen variations where the chicken gets the broiler time without the sauce, the either rests on some sauce on the plate or gets an off center drizzle. In both cases extra sauce is available at the table, the idea being to emphasize the coating, not let it lose its character in the sauce. I admit the concept of safegaurding the coating appeals to me but I've not tried it yet personally.

post #3 of 12

This recipe does not appeal to me.  I very rarely like my food smothered with or cooked in tomato sauce.  I can see the use of the ham, but I would also not use canadian bacon, it seems more fitting to use prosciutto which is also referred to as parma ham.  I'm not sure what "Tasty cheese" or "mixed herbs" mean, it's too vague and could open up a world of possibilities and flavors. 

 

My family loves chicken parmesan, sometimes we make it with veal.  When I make it for guests I use whole chicken breasts, bread them and fry until golden then finish cooking in the oven in a deep dish with my tomato sauce and real mozzarella cheese.  But when I make it just for us I pound the breasts thin, coat them with a crumb mixture made from crackers, freshly grated garlic, parmesan cheese and fresh thyme.  I fry them in olive oil until golden brown and cooked through and then place them on a rack and top with provolone or fresh mozzarella.  I serve with pasta with a little tomato sauce and lots of fresh parmesan on top.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

hi, phatch ~ that sounds like a good way to go with it as well, and i am sure it could easily be adapted to the recipe above, if anyone wants go go that way. i might try it then next time i make this. i can say that this way, the toasty-golden cheese and the baked-in sauce sure is good. doing it as you describe would, i am sure, highlight other features, such as the crispiness of the coating, and give it a whole new dimension.

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post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

hi, koukouvagia -

 

both of your preparations (for guests and for home) sound delicious! i do not really have access to veal, unfortunately, because there are so many good recipes out there featuring veal. one of these days..... 

 

no worries about the lack of appeal ~ everyone has different tastes and preferences, although i suspect that your preferences could probably be adapted for this as well (see phatch's comments for an example). regarding the canadian bacon versus proscuitto, i did have proscuitto available, but made a spur-of-the-moment decision in order to get the canadian bacon out of the fridge, where it was just taking up space. I understand your comment vis a vis "tasty cheese" and "mixed herbs." my friend so shared it with me is australian, so i figured it was simply a semantic thing, but i interpreted his terms to refer to a shredded blend of italian cheeses and a mix of common italian herbs.

 

i appreciate the comments and the description of how you prepare this dish, as well as the food for thought!

 

ron

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post #6 of 12

 

Hey Koukouvagia,

 I see you are from the NY of the NY and the stores there you can get anything you want almost anytime of the day or night the city that doesn't sleep and all that. This dude or dudette is from Chinook, Montana. Shopping at the 7/11 there I can understand the need to use the phrase like "Tasty cheese" or "mixed herbs". If you want to think about it's like camping in the wild. I myself have traveled to the mid-west and I saw on a menu a California burger I asked just what is that, the waitress in the small South Dakota town said very Proudly "it's got lettuce and tomato on it". I was sort of dumb struck but then all you had to do was walk out side into the 3 feet of snow and then it hits you, you really are in Kansas so to speak.

   So what I got out of this is don't use the string cheese from the cooler at the  7-11, see if the Pizza place is still open and go in and try to get some of their packets of flavor enhancers i.e.  parmesan cheese  go for the ones on the bottom as they will be more aged (If green do not use).

   OK just having a bit of fun here. I made this last night as I was trying to work out what the heck was I going to do with all this sauce I made two nights ago. My old lady and the kid loved it! Yea I did use prosciutto and I never use Italian bread crumbs always panko but then I lived in Hawaii for a few years (long story there). If I didn't have the sauce it would of been chicken strips, yet again. ~Edd~

post #7 of 12

@ Tas,

 

Thanks for sharing Jarrod´s  and your´s  Chicken Parmigiana ... Looks like you guys had a real Italian fest !

 

Kindest.

Margaux Cintrano.

( Margcata)

post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

hi, margi - thnks for the kind words ~ it was certainly a good one!

 

g'morning, ed - thanks for trying this, and i am glad you liked it. you've definitely got the right idea about how things are in the middle of nowhere. it's not quite that desperate, but it is close - and it seems spot on when i am trying to find prosioutto for a dish like this, or (for example) naranja agria for some yucatan or caribbean dish that i want to try. 

 

a few notes: the recipe, as written, is how i got it from my friend in australia. some of the workding is a little vague (example: the aforementioned "tasty cheese" and "mixed herbs"), but in all honesty - most people here are going to know the typical examples that fit the description to the cuisine.

 

another thing to keep in mind is that this (and nearly any other) "weeknight" dish employes a few conveniences such as canned tomatoes, "regular" ham etc.; the recipe is fine as-written, but most anyone interested enough to be here will know to "step it up," if certain ingredients are available: proscuitto, fresh-cut herbs, stock rather than beef cubes, fresh mozzarella, fresh tomatoes etc.

 

these factors, and probably others, help, in my opinion to make the dish and its resulting deliciousness more "accessible" to the average home cook. i can't speak for everyone here, but i get discouraged when i see a recipe that says it HAS to have some bog list of exotic (and often expensive) ingredients that are probably not in the local grocery; said discouragement can cause one to miss out on a good meal. however, when one sees a recipe with easy ingredients and methods (as the step-by-step pix show, this is truly simple), then they're able to make it, taste it, and enjoy it - and maybe be interested enough to branch out a little and spread their wings next time, using that fresh mozzarella - or the prosciutto that they found in a specialty market on their trip to billings or great falls. or perhaps they can experiment a bit with different-yet-outstanding methods such as those described by phatch and koukouvagia. but the fact is that they would probably never have even tried it in the first place, if the recipe and methods were out of reach. being told that something has to be THIS WAY, or it will be an utter, disgusting failure, will discourage them from even trying.

 

in short, dishes such as this are what i like to call "gateways" for people who like to cook, like to take something accessible and make a delicious meal, and then improve on it in every way that they can. such successes lead to greater interest, and the fostering of a desire to improve and hone their cooking skills.

 

thoughts?

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post #9 of 12

This looks like a great recipe, will have to try! 

Tim from ZRCR

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Tim from ZRCR

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post #10 of 12

i am going to have to check this out later it looks really good

post #11 of 12

According to your recipe it staes red onions., but you are shwing white onions. Why not just say onions.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

zoji & iluv - let me know how you like it, and please feel free to ask if you have any questions. it's a good one!

 

chefed - please note to the discussion subsequent to the opening post; this is a very versatile recipe that i received from a friend in australia. i provided the recipe as i recevied it from him, and then prepared my interpretation of it, based partially on what is availabile in my one-horse town, and partially on pure whim.

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