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post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicko View Post

 Remember school loans are NOT bankrupt-able so you can't file bankruptcy to get rid of them.

 

H

 

I know this post is about a year old 

but i just thought id throw this out there 

this is not exactly true 

you can put a Student Loan on a Bankruptcy 

however for the Court's to allow it you have to show it truly is a hardship 

and also you have to be able to show that you have at-least tried to pay and keep up weather this is always making a payment on time but just not being able to pay the proper amount 

say you have 1100 in student loan payment each month 

you make 1600 a month you spend 1300 a month  to live pay bills eat all that stuff 

you take the other 300 each month make your payment on time but just be short 

and then you show you have tried in good faith to deal with the student loans 

but you just can not afford it you show that you could end up being homeless or a true hardship 

then the court will allow 

a Student loan on a Bankruptcy 

i am just using this as an example I'm not suggested anything I'm just putting out the information 

post #32 of 34

Yea, it sucks. I went through it. You just have to trim down your lifestyle a bit. Get roomates, a bicycle, stop going out to bars,  etc. Also, seasonal resorts are good money savers. I worked at one in a tiny town, rented a 3 bedroom house with another seasonal worker on the cheap. $250 each (that included utilities). There was also a a couple bunkhouses available to for $5 per day. I did that for about  2 weeks, but it filled up with some real freaks when the busy season started.

 

Moving to a medium sized city helps also. I am about to move to a sous chef job at a private resort in a city population of about 250,000. Good thing about that is that working in from bigger cities, you will have more experience than most of the locals. You make more money, and rent is alot cheaper. Bad thing, is that you will mostly end up working with mostly ametures.

 

(paragraph deleted, promoting illegal actibvities).

 

You could always try to move to another country. That is not easy to do though

post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by carrionshine211 View Post

Yea, it sucks. I went through it. You just have to trim down your lifestyle a bit. Get roomates, a bicycle, stop going out to bars,  etc. Also, seasonal resorts are good money savers. I worked at one in a tiny town, rented a 3 bedroom house with another seasonal worker on the cheap. $250 each (that included utilities). There was also a a couple bunkhouses available to for $5 per day. I did that for about  2 weeks, but it filled up with some real freaks when the busy season started.

 

Moving to a medium sized city helps also. I am about to move to a sous chef job at a private resort in a city population of about 250,000. Good thing about that is that working in from bigger cities, you will have more experience than most of the locals. You make more money, and rent is alot cheaper. Bad thing, is that you will mostly end up working with mostly ametures.

 

Or, do like a guy I went to culinary school with did. Just dont pay it and move to Texas. Apparently, Tesas is a debtors paradise. They cant garnish your wages, and the statute of limitations is only 4 years! Statute of limitations does not apply to federal loans however, only private loans. The majority of his loans are private though.

 

You could always try to move to another country. That is not easy to do though

Stealing from employers, and now justifying defaulting on loans, you're beyond a class act.

post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thumper1279 View Post

I know this post is about a year old 

but i just thought id throw this out there 

this is not exactly true 

you can put a Student Loan on a Bankruptcy 

however for the Court's to allow it you have to show it truly is a hardship 

and also you have to be able to show that you have at-least tried to pay and keep up weather this is always making a payment on time but just not being able to pay the proper amount 

say you have 1100 in student loan payment each month 

you make 1600 a month you spend 1300 a month  to live pay bills eat all that stuff 

you take the other 300 each month make your payment on time but just be short 

and then you show you have tried in good faith to deal with the student loans 

but you just can not afford it you show that you could end up being homeless or a true hardship 

then the court will allow 

a Student loan on a Bankruptcy 

i am just using this as an example I'm not suggested anything I'm just putting out the information 

 

 

This is factual. If you can prove hardship then you can have the loans dismissed but it is extremely rare and also very difficult to do. In my opinion the amount of time you would actually need to prove this would create even great cost. Remember you have to pay a bankruptcy attorney in most cases. 

 

So can you put student loans on bankruptcy? Yes but only in rare cases. There is a good article about this on Nolo

 

http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/student-loan-debt-bankruptcy.html

Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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