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Crab for a crowd!

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Looking for a fast, efficient way to prepare A LOT of crab for our eatery. We currently boil them in pots and to me it is slow and the crab is left with too much water inside. Steamer? Convection oven? Or is boiling the way to go?? Any input appreciated

post #2 of 10

What type of crab? Live? Cooked frozen?

post #3 of 10

Steamer. Ideally a double stack if your steaming that much. A steamer is so much faster it's amazing.

 

Dave


Edited by DuckFat - 3/19/12 at 5:49pm
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 

Frozen.

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks Dave!

post #6 of 10

Frozen crab itself just by being frozen will contain water and in some cases they frost or add water to it for extra weight on sale. Best thing I can see is quick steam and let sit and drain in same perforated pans. Or a Combi type steam bake oven where you can actually regulate how much steam by percentages. The type of crab also plays a part  Blue claw, King, Stone etc.??

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 10

If your dealing with frozen crab you don't want to steam it and then let it set or even thaw first unless your using it rapidly like on a high volume buffet. You can have product go bad very rapidly that way. The beauty of a steamer is that you can cook from a frozen state in a matter of minutes. Like Chefedb the vast majority of King and Snow crab I see is coated in ice from being processed at sea. If you feel the crab is being served with to much water have your cooks remove the knuckles first or split the crab after cooking. I would save the knuckles and clean them for stuffing etc but this adds labor and alters your food cost.

 

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

So, sounds like you both think a steamer would be the way to go. I am really not familiar with either one. I used to waitress at a place and they used a steamer for the crab, frozen king crab, it was a specialty item not on the menu daily. So that is what I know of a steamer. Then I was thinking a convection oven would also be fast and eliminate the water issue because it is a dry heat? These are frozen pre-cooked legs. Would the convection oven and steamer be similar in cooking time? Also does the steamer rebound quickly between uses?

This forum is great, I appreciate the time in answering my questions!

post #9 of 10

I would not use the Convection oven. Boiling is a vastly better option. Crab that is harvested/cooked and frozen at sea is typically cooked in salt water. When you roast or even broil King or Snow Crab you have to be very careful or your product can turn salty. The turnaround time on a steamer is virtually instant. You can cook an entire 6" hotel pan at a time in a matter of minutes.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #10 of 10

Depends on the brand and the size of the steamer.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
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