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Pairing specific wines

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I need some suggestions for a dinner for 4.  For the first course we have either an Hermitage "Chevalier de Sterimb" 98 or Meursault Premier Cru "Charmes" 00, and for the main course a Nuits-St.-George Premier Cru "Vallerots" 02 or Pommard Premier Cru "Bertins" 02 or Margeaux Giscours 01.  For the dessert a Sauternes Premier Cru 97 or 99.  I have only myself in the kitchen that is fairly modern, but I don't have equipment for "molecular" cuisine!  Our preference is french/italian cuisine - not too heavy.

 

Hoping for some good suggestions

 

ashagen

 

post #2 of 8

Your Hermitage will be very different than your white burgundies, but all 3 have medium acidity and lovely fruit characters. The burgundies will offer more buttery notes & oak on the palette, were the hermitage with offer more stone fruit and honey and less oak.I believe the more oak the more aggressive you can be with the particular way you cook the food. IE, poached versus grilled, steamed versus broiled. I think it is important to think about the body and structure of the wine to help you decide on the best way to cook your meal. Then think about the level of acidity to help you consider the acidity in the food (they like each other)then think about the fattiness of the food, literally and mouth feel to help you determine how to balance the acidity.Think fish & chips with fresh squeezed lemon. Fat balanced by acid. I love wines from Margaux, although I don't have the opportunity much anymore to indulge,but black fruit like black berries, black cherries come to mind.As does chocolate and vanilla. I believe Giscours has a tobacco & ceder note that you should consider as well as chocolate.The last Margaux I drank was a 89 Palmer that I simply had Morbier & dried black figs. Perfect. I would stay away from grilling so to speak and lean towards a nice long braise of lamb shank or short ribs that you can play with once again as you understand the nuances of the wine.I think you want mellow,yet deep.As for your Sauternes, a simple but important rule should be followed. The dessert should never be sweeter then the wine, it will be like drinking orange juice after brushing your teeth, not good. They should be of equal levels of sweetness or the wine should be sweeter than the dessert.I love honey, caramel, hibiscus & custards with white dessert wines, but I also love how saltiness works with dessert wines. Give me a beautiful matured Roquefort, almonds and dried apricots and it's a done deal.

Happy cooking and sipping

Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cape chef View Post

Your Hermitage will be very different than your white burgundies, but all 3 have medium acidity and lovely fruit characters. The burgundies will offer more buttery notes & oak on the palette, were the hermitage with offer more stone fruit and honey and less oak.I believe the more oak the more aggressive you can be with the particular way you cook the food. IE, poached versus grilled, steamed versus broiled. I think it is important to think about the body and structure of the wine to help you decide on the best way to cook your meal. Then think about the level of acidity to help you consider the acidity in the food (they like each other)then think about the fattiness of the food, literally and mouth feel to help you determine how to balance the acidity.Think fish & chips with fresh squeezed lemon. Fat balanced by acid. I love wines from Margaux, although I don't have the opportunity much anymore to indulge,but black fruit like black berries, black cherries come to mind.As does chocolate and vanilla. I believe Giscours has a tobacco & ceder note that you should consider as well as chocolate.The last Margaux I drank was a 89 Palmer that I simply had Morbier & dried black figs. Perfect. I would stay away from grilling so to speak and lean towards a nice long braise of lamb shank or short ribs that you can play with once again as you understand the nuances of the wine.I think you want mellow,yet deep.As for your Sauternes, a simple but important rule should be followed. The dessert should never be sweeter then the wine, it will be like drinking orange juice after brushing your teeth, not good. They should be of equal levels of sweetness or the wine should be sweeter than the dessert.I love honey, caramel, hibiscus & custards with white dessert wines, but I also love how saltiness works with dessert wines. Give me a beautiful matured Roquefort, almonds and dried apricots and it's a done deal.

Happy cooking and sipping


I could not have said it any better.

My boss has several Chateau Palmer Margaux from 1989. It is rated at 100 pts. and is very expensive now.

Mersault is very rich and buttery I'd say something with lots of vegetables in it or a shrimp dish might do well there.

The Margaux is perfect for those dark meats and rich demi-glaze sauces.

 

post #4 of 8

 

Good Morning,

 

I would like to know more indepthly, the guest profiles ... Are all of your guests carnivores ? Do all of the guests eat shellfish ? Are their any vegetarians, pescatarians etcetra ?

 

I am veered toward, a Bordeaux, Margaux with a filet mignon with home made Bernaise ...  Always delectable ...

 

With white wine: Poached Salmon ( recipe posted in Chef Talk Recipes ), steamed mussels in white white wine ( same as u plan to drink ) or Langoustines seared ... or Coquille Sant Jacques ...

 

Dessert:  chocolate fondue, as it does bring a social climate link ... or an international cheese and fruit platter ...

 

Another point, the destination of the dinner ?  In Italy, one would eat alot different than in California, for example ... Product availability and season are quintessential.

 

Have a nice Sunday.

Margaux Cintrano.

( Margcata. )

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks to Cape chef, Chefross and Margcata for your replies.  I am danish and live in Copenhagen.  My parents lived a number of years in France before I was born (in 1933!) and the family has always been francophile.  The wines I have mentioned are all bought in France during our holidays there, either at the domaines or in one of the big supermarkets at their "Foire au Vins" in september.  Our guests for the specific dinner are "omnivores", but we share the interest in good wine and food, although their main interest is Italy.

 

Anna Sofie Hagen

post #6 of 8

 

 

Ciao.

 

I have just received your lovely thank you note ...

 

I would suggest an Antipasti starter, with a variety of charcuterie, langoustines, caponata, Reggiano Parmesan, Fiore Sardo Pecorino, Proscuitto di Parma, etcetra ... Sort of as a buffet perhaps so that everyone can mingle ... ( do not know if all guests know one another ) ... Prosecco, Asti Spumante and / or Champagne or Cava ... sparkling wine ... to break ice ... and toast.

 

Depending, meat is a bit heavy at night ... I might go with a Ribbon pasta with Scampi perhaps, or  Squid ( black ) Ravioli stuffed with Prawns or Cod fish filling ...

 

Definitely not tiramisu at night !!!  It means to Pick Up or Energise too. I would go with an interntl or Italian and French cheese platter.

 

The Bordeaux :  this is really for filet mignon --- or similar, a steak cut of choice ... A starter --- if you wish to do Italian, then  the Charcuterie platter ... and some acorn fed Iberian Pata Negra Spanish ham from Huelva, Andalusia.  

 

 

Hope this has assisted.

 

Kind regards.

Margaux Cintrano.

 

 

 

post #7 of 8

i like red wine 

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cape chef View Post
 

Your Hermitage will be very different than your white burgundies, but all 3 have medium acidity and lovely fruit characters. The burgundies will offer more buttery notes & oak on the palette, were the hermitage with offer more stone fruit and honey and less oak.I believe the more oak the more aggressive you can be with the particular way you cook the food. IE, poached versus grilled, steamed versus broiled. I think it is important to think about the body and structure of the wine to help you decide on the best way to cook your meal. Then think about the level of acidity to help you consider the acidity in the food (they like each other)then think about the fattiness of the food, literally and mouth feel to help you determine how to balance the acidity.Think fish & chips with fresh squeezed lemon. Fat balanced by acid. I love wines from Margaux, although I don't have the opportunity much anymore to indulge,but black fruit like black berries, black cherries come to mind.As does chocolate and vanilla. I believe Giscours has a tobacco & ceder note that you should consider as well as chocolate.The last Margaux I drank was a 89 Palmer that I simply had Morbier & dried black figs. Perfect. I would stay away from grilling so to speak and lean towards a nice long braise of lamb shank or short ribs that you can play with once again as you understand the nuances of the wine.I think you want mellow,yet deep.As for your Sauternes, a simple but important rule should be followed. The dessert should never be sweeter then the wine, it will be like drinking orange juice after brushing your teeth, not good. They should be of equal levels of sweetness or the wine should be sweeter than the dessert.I love honey, caramel, hibiscus & custards with white dessert wines, but I also love how saltiness works with dessert wines. Give me a beautiful matured Roquefort, almonds and dried apricots and it's a done deal.

Happy cooking and sipping

Dude,

You know your Stuff my Friend...Wines, You've Opened my Eyes to other Choices to try...Some of these Wines I never even thought of trying...

My rule with White Wines and Proteins is...White with Poultry, Seafood, Turkey, Pheasant...Dark Proteins...Prime Rib, Lamb, Duck, Red Wines...

 

My problem with the taste profile...I would be a Drunken Soldier before the match off with this Protein...Mostly Regions of choices...


Edited by Its Bubba7 - 12/23/13 at 4:35pm
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