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Let's Talk Mushrooms - Page 2

post #31 of 39

Gorgeous looking mushroom !

 

GM, please tell us what you plan on doing with that puppy ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #32 of 39

That's an older picture, petals - cultivated king trumpet. Long since used up for a mushroom stew, frankonian style, with chicken stock, sour cream, home-made bacon, onions and parsley. The next harvest is coming up soon, though!


Edited by GeneMachine - 5/1/13 at 7:32am
post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

Mushrooms are in season in Indiana?

Yes, fot morel mushrooms,
It is a little late this year because we've had a colder than normal spring.
post #34 of 39

I am THAT jealous. No morels to be found anywhere around here.

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post

I am THAT jealous. No morels to be found anywhere around here.


What about early false morels (Böhmische Verpel)? I suppose they should grow in Bavaria, too? We don't have true morels here either, because of that freezing second half of March. Actually, even early false morels started only in April.

 

Quote from wikipedia:

The fungus has a wide distribution throughout northern North America;[5] its range extends south to the Great Lakes in the Midwestern United States, and south to northern California on the West Coast.[17] In Europe, the fungus is widely distributed, and has been collected from Austria,[32] the Czech Republic,[33] Denmark,[32] Finland,[34] Germany,[35] Norway,[36] Poland,[37] Russia,[38] Slovenia,[32] Spain,[32] Sweden,[39] and the Ukraine.[40] In Asia, it has been recorded from India[41] and Turkey.[42]

 

Which surprised me, since judging by the (Slovak, Czech, German and scientific, not English) name, I would come to think it's peculiar to Central Europe.

 

CORRECTION: Just checked mushroom news and at least in western lowlands, there already grow even true morels.

post #36 of 39

They should grow here, yes - but they are considered endangered in this region. Never found one myself, and if I did, I would probably leave it.

post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneMachine View Post

They should grow here, yes - but they are considered endangered in this region. Never found one myself, and if I did, I would probably leave it.


Aha, I understand. While early false morels are plentiful here, Amanita caesarea, which is one of the most beloved mushrooms in the Mediterranean region, is endangered here, so are several bolete species that are cherished in France and most truffles, and also the matsutake that is sold for ridiculous sums of money in Japan, all are protected by law and their foraging is fined. On the other hand, hardly anyone comes across these.

post #38 of 39
Isn't the amanita the mushroom one takes in order to trip out? Red cap, kind of speckled? I think that is the one referred to in J.Allegro's ridiculous book, saying that Xtians & Jews were really a mushroom partaking cult and all the scriptures are nothing but code for hiding their proclivity for "mind expanding" substances from the authorities. Yea, really someone was stupid enough to write that. He had been an ancient language scholar, working on translating the dead sea scrolls, exposing how they were being construed into something they were not by Jewish and catholic scholars, even. Then ruined his reputation by writing the ridiculous mushroom book. Pretty sure it was the Amanita.

Edit: Ok just looked it up and I'm thinking of another variety in the genus. (muscari-something like that) But most amanitas are toxic, according to wikipedia.
Here is a pic of the on you mind trip on.
File:Fliegenpilz-1.jpg
Edited by IndyGal - 5/27/13 at 8:45am
post #39 of 39

What you mean is fly agaric, Amanita muscaria, the red-capped mushroom with white dots on it and a tender white stalk with a fragile ring. It is moderately poisonous and will make you throw up and hallucinate. Interestingly, it is these hallucinogenic qualities of fly agaric that make it popular as a drug with some Central Asian and Siberian peoples. Apparently, you can prepare it in such a way as to rid it of its vomit-inducing qualities while keeping the hallucinogenic qualities intact.

 

Amanita caesarea, on the other hand, is one of the most highly-prized and sought-after edibles in the world. Thriving especially around the Mediterranean, it is considered the king of mushrooms by many - although this title tends to change its owner from region to region - and its cap is without any spots, while the stem and gills are yellow.

 

Amanita rubescens, known by its common English name - blusher, is another highly-prized edible of the Amanita genus, filling in for the former in colder climates, where Amanita caesarea fails to thrive (and so foraging for it may be penalised). In Czech Republic, it is commonly used in the preparation of a variation on the common Czech theme of Sunday dinner of beef broth with noodles followed by the boiled beef served with a sauce and homemade bread dumplings, starring in a creamy mushroom sauce. Just like brittlegills, blushers pop up immediately in the summer after a heavy rainfall. However, given the possibility of mistaking the sometimes-deadly false blusher, Amanita pantherina, for the true one, it is not foraged by many. But those who do have the guts - or rather the knowledge and experience - swear by it.

 

The genus includes a few more edibles, but its other species generally range from benign-but-repulsive to deadly poisonous, the latter extreme being most famously represented by the death cap (Amanita phalloides) and the destroying angel (Amanita virosa).


Edited by Slayertplsko - 5/27/13 at 1:23pm
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