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Tips for Growing Celery?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi guys :)

 

Do you have any advice for keeping a celery healthy? I grew one from the end of a store celery and it's about a foot and a half tall now. It did great outside through a cool winter, but I think I'll have to take it inside soon. It doesn't seem to like the heat (and I don't blame it :P). Is there anything else I can do to help it thrive? It's the first plant I haven't killed and I'm trying to keep it that way. :)

 

-Ash

post #2 of 11

I know it may be too late, but celery need to be denied light in order for it to come out that lighter color you see when you buy them at the store.

If you don't do this the celery will be so bitter it will be inedible.

While the plants are still quite young and small I place a large white pipe about 6 inches in diameter by 24" inches high on top of the plant and sink it into the ground.

The plant grows up in this pipe and is denied light.

I made the mistake the 1st year and was sadly disappointed.

Don't you be.

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Oh, really? Wow. I wondered why it was so much greener and prettier... and that's why the store celery is all bunched tightly together, isn't it? Oh well, maybe it'll just end up being a pet plant. I'm not entirely sure it's going to make it until we start turning on the air conditioning anyway. There's always next year. :)

post #4 of 11

I often get celery in the local market here (that is, farmer's market, street market - where the best vegetables are in rome) and they;re often clearly not deprived of sun - the stalks are thinner and stringier, they splay out more, but they're tastier in cooking.  I never found them bitter, just tasting more of celery.  I wouldn't really want them in salad unless chopped, but for soups and sauces they're great. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

I often get celery in the local market here (that is, farmer's market, street market - where the best vegetables are in rome) and they;re often clearly not deprived of sun - the stalks are thinner and stringier, they splay out more, but they're tastier in cooking.  I never found them bitter, just tasting more of celery.  I wouldn't really want them in salad unless chopped, but for soups and sauces they're great. 



"Terroir".......my Roman friend.

post #6 of 11

I grow celery every year outdoors in a raised bed amongst the lettuce - learned years ago from someone who knew more than me to put a cleaned square waxed milk carton - 2 litre or 2 quart over it as soon as about 6 inches high - water inside the container - when it gets real high - put another one on top, Put a stake in it through side to hold in place - bury about 1 inch in soil.  Hope this helps - should produce beautiful celery.

post #7 of 11

Sorry, chefross, but what does terroir mean?  Never was good in french. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #8 of 11

I'm not ChefRoss, but the English translation of terroir is soil and is used, commonly, to refer to the characteristics of where something is grown or raised, i.e. Vidalia onions from Vidalia, GA have a unique flavor/taste as compared to the same variety grown in, say, California or San Marino tomatoes grown in, say, California as compare to Italy.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Sorry, chefross, but what does terroir mean?  Never was good in french. 



 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #9 of 11

Thanks Pete...couldn't have said it any better. 

post #10 of 11

I'm pretty sure you can use just about anything to blanch the stalks (burlap, mulch, leaves, etc).  As for your plant, Celery is a biennial.  What this means in terms of an edible Celery could translate into not-so-good but having not dealt with celery in the second year before I don't know.  But if it is similar to other biennials what ends up happening is the plant itself, the part you would normally consume is usually worthless as a food, most usually because the plant will toughen or gain other unattractive characteristics (for eating that is).  However, you can let that plant grow out, flower, seed and then collect your own Celery seed to use as a seasoning.  I don't have my copy of "Seed to Seed" in front of me, but from a source online it looks like Celery is self-fertile and you could then propagate next year from your own seed. 

post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

I'm not ChefRoss, but the English translation of terroir is soil and is used, commonly, to refer to the characteristics of where something is grown or raised, i.e. Vidalia onions from Vidalia, GA have a unique flavor/taste as compared to the same variety grown in, say, California or San Marino tomatoes grown in, say, California as compare to Italy.
 



 


And I thought it was an insultsmile.gif

 

I figured it had the root of soil, but there is an insult in italian that would be equivalent more or less in both etymology and meaning to "clod".  

Anyway there is such good volcanic soil around Italy that makes tomatoes, artichokes, peppers and other stuff so wonderful. 

 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
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