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Need Help Making Stock

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi all I have to ask about making stock. Can I freeze the bones until I have enough to make stock or is that not advised? how do you find stock bones besides your own use? ask a butcher? How long can bones be stored in the refrigerator before you have to use them or lose them? thanks

post #2 of 13

I freeze my stock bones all the time, it may take a month or two to get enough to make a good pot.

 

mjb.

 

 

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 13

1 week tops depending on temp. Yes you can freeze. It is hard to get bones in supermarket as most of their meat comes boxed and pre cut. Try and find a local real butcher shop, he will sell you bones. Tell him you want shin bones if possible and cut them  smaller to extrude more flavor.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Well I got what he had 10 pounds neck 5 pounds back. What would you do with it?

post #5 of 13

It CAN be used to make stock.  The problem with small bones is they do not contain much marrow which has a lot of flavor.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 13

Many years ago, had 2 Rotties and decided to treat them to a nice bone.  I'm lucky enough to have a real "butcher" shop in my area.  I'm sure big RAW bones would have been heavenly for dogs, but that just skeeved me out.  Decided to roast off whatever I got with some veggies & make some stock first... a double whammy.  The shop almost GAVE them away.  I went in and asked the "kid" behind the counter if they had any BIG, bare bones iin the back.  She kinda tilted her head to the side (like the dogs sometimes did), looked a little confused, and said "BEAR bones??"  Couldn't help but laugh, but added BARE bones... as in nekked!  Guy in back brought out what I'm pretty sure might have been a whole cow femur... MASSIVE.  He was very willing to cut it into 4 big chunks... probably 8-10" long each.  I hauled out old-fashioned, black/speckled enamel roating pan that I usually used for a big turkey and roasted away.  Once veggies and bones were seriously brown, ended up using TWO big pots to make stock... LOTS of it.  Once the bones gave up everythiing I wanted, the dogs got them.  The dogs were HAPPY, I was HAPPY, everything was good in the world!

post #7 of 13

Reason he had theseis that he was taking meat off them for chopmeat.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 13

Along with all the other great tips here, I use commercial demi glaze in my stocks. They can be purchased in small containers of multi use sizes and come in a variety of flavors, traditional French, chicken, roast chicken, and vegetarian varieties. I also agree that you can freeze bones. I often save 1 qt take out containers and store the finished stock for use later. I make a green tea soba noodle dish with home made vegetable & regular dashi, (think just add miso for miso soup) all the time. 

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

True art, is to conceal art......

 

https://www.instagram.com/smokehouse_84/

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post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the great tips. Well here is an issue, I put two frozen bags of stock in my refrigerator to defrost and three days later I notice a strange smell. Well I looked at one of the bags and noticed some blood and ooze on the refrigerator shelf. It was in a small pool there were some other items near it, bottled milk and leeks. It didn't appear to have crossed paths as I removed them and looked over closely and wiped the refrigerator glass clean, I took that bag and double bagged it inside the other bags. They are still slightly frozen. Now I'm concerned, I'm new to cooking and this is my first attempt at stock making. What would you do am I worrying about contamination too much? thanks 

post #10 of 13

When in doubt, throw it out.

 

BDL

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

Throw what out? the leeks it was near or the chicken? also, does the chicken first have to be completely thawed???


Edited by mrdecoy1 - 4/9/12 at 10:19am
post #12 of 13

I don't know how to say it clearer than the old rhyme, "When in doubt, throw it out." 

  • If something smells, throw it out. 
  • If something was sitting in a puddle of something else, throw it out. 
  • If something turns color, throw it out. 

 

A related lesson: 

  • Keep your refrigerator CLEAN.  Not just clean, but CLEAN. 

 

One more:

  • DON'T overstock your refrigerator.  When stuff gets old, throw it out.  If you don't want to throw out so much stuff, buy less; vacuum seal, and/or freeze more.

 

BDL

post #13 of 13

There is no reason for BLOOD to leak out on anything,thats called inproper wrapping and storage. Like BDL says ""If in doubt, throw it out"' or simply, if you would not eat it, then do not serve it.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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