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What To Call Myself

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

i just took my last cooking class yesterday, my program is at a community college and I will be getting a business degree in food service management/hospitality with specialization in culinary artistry. The program wasn't the greatest thanks to college polotics and I can't really go to a better school. I have good basics and fundamentals and could probably get a job as a sous easily. But here is the thing...I am not really a culinary student anymore I am not cooking only have to take math and speech and a couple random business classes for my degree. I am not certified through the ACF yet either. I don't have experience working in a real restaurant yet which is why I am struggling to call myself a chef. My career goals aren't even to really work and own a restaurant I want to work in the personal chef and maybe catering sector due to having young kids and also a side business as a food photographer. Slaving on the line isn't really something I can do for some years.

 

Is it right to call myself a chef if I am not certified nor working as a chef? EVERYONE I know refers to me as chef but I don't know I feel like I haven't earned it enough even though I was a very very hard working student and was top of my class. Thoughts?

 

(this could just be a case of my low self confidence, i struggle believing I can do it when challenged with something but I always make it in the end, I know I am a chef but my lack of experience makes me feel like I admit that out loud yet...)

post #2 of 30

A Chef runs one or more kitchens. It is a job title, generally for someone who can cook, crazy.gif but has acquired the experience to cope with

  • personnel management
  • inventory management
  • compliance with health codes
  • business finance
  • business law
  • accounting
  • equipment breakdowns and malfunctions
  • vendor relationships
  • customer relationships

along with the necessary culinary management, i.e. cooking. menus, etc.

 

You said you will be getting a business degree, presumably a B.A.?

 

You are a college graduate, period.

 

With your lack of experience, I respectfully disagree that you are qualified to be a sous chef, let alone a line cook. Education alone does not qualify anyone for a management position above that of trainee level, let alone a technical vocation such as cooking, IMHO.

 

It is nice that your friends call you chef. It is also good that you are uncomfortable with the title, laser.gifyou have not earned it yet!

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #3 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by CandyCLC View Post

i just took my last cooking class yesterday, my program is at a community college and I will be getting a business degree in food service management/hospitality with specialization in culinary artistry. The program wasn't the greatest thanks to college polotics and I can't really go to a better school. I have good basics and fundamentals and could probably get a job as a sous easily. But here is the thing...I am not really a culinary student anymore I am not cooking only have to take math and speech and a couple random business classes for my degree. I am not certified through the ACF yet either. I don't have experience working in a real restaurant yet which is why I am struggling to call myself a chef. My career goals aren't even to really work and own a restaurant I want to work in the personal chef and maybe catering sector due to having young kids and also a side business as a food photographer. Slaving on the line isn't really something I can do for some years.

 

Is it right to call myself a chef if I am not certified nor working as a chef? EVERYONE I know refers to me as chef but I don't know I feel like I haven't earned it enough even though I was a very very hard working student and was top of my class. Thoughts?

 

(this could just be a case of my low self confidence, i struggle believing I can do it when challenged with something but I always make it in the end, I know I am a chef but my lack of experience makes me feel like I admit that out loud yet...)

Pete hit the nail on the head, You have no experience working in a restaurant,  you would be hard pressed to find a line cook position.

You may start out as a prep cook or in the pantry and work from there.

 

A sous chef has to be the best line cook in the kitchen, that requires putting in years of ball busting time on the line. That's not something you earn in "chef school".
Go get your feet wet, then worry about a title after you get a few years in. 
 

 

post #4 of 30

I wrote a wall of text explaining why you aren't a chef, wouldn't cut it as a sous-chef and how you wouldn't even get a job as a line cook.

 

I then deleted it because it would just be another meaningless wall-of-text from some guy out there in cyber space.

 

My best advice to you is to ask to stage for 9 consecutive nights at the best restaurant in town in order to prove yourself and hopefully find a position at that place.  Keep trying this until a place accepts your offer.

 

This would be the best learning you can't ever pay for and won't ever get paid for.

 

Honestly.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #5 of 30

"9 consecutive nights" ?

 

What? If a guy sucks after one(1) shift, he should look somewhere else. If he's good enough, he should be getting paid.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #6 of 30

No, you are not a "Chef".  If you have graduated, you are a "culinary school graduate"

 

A  "sous" is the Chef's right hand man, one that s/he trusts to run the place when they are off or away.  They need to see you cook and run a place before you have an opportunity to earn this title.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 30

Call yourself an aspiring chef or chef wannabee. or chef in progress,

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 30

A work in Progress

post #9 of 30

By my experience, it is best to be real and honest when you are looking for a job. Say that you are kin to learn. If they will need you you will get the position you can handle and go from there. You will earn your title, eventually.

I have done that two years ago. It takes a lot of experience, to be able to work on the line. I am working in a hotel kitchen and the organization there is different, than in a restaurant. Sometimes I will do soups, appetizers, maybe side dishes, or even meets, I will even do an a la Carte dish, if there is time and someone is always there to supervise me. But if the rush comes in there is no way I could handle it, without annoying everyone around me. Not to mention there is half of the dishes from the menu, I have no clue how to make.

I guess what I am trying to say is from what I have seen, there is nothing more frustrating to other chefs than people who come working in to our kitchen as "experienced" cooks and freeze, where there is a lot of work to be done. wink.gif

post #10 of 30

I have worked in hotels, fine dining, pubs, bars, you name it ive done it. Going on 8 years now of getting my ass nailed, on average 60 hours a week doing anywhere between 50 to 500 covers a night, in boiling hot kitchens, learning what i can in addition to the culinary degree i obtained 6 years ago, to get to where im to today, just to be considered for my first management level job as a sous chef. If your straight out of school i agree with Pete. And if you havnt worked in a restaurant or on a line before which you say you havnt. You are in for a surprise :P, i was cooking for 2 years before doing my culinary training, i know first hand nothing you learn in school will prepare you for 25 to 40 degrees centigrade heat in a kitchen when your up to your eyeballs in prep work that needs to be done while you have 150 or more demanding customers sitting in the dining room expecting you to do 20 things at once to make sure they all have there meals within 20 minutes (depending the type of restaurant), i wish you the best in your career right now however its just getting started for you. I would say culinary school graduate.

post #11 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thank you everyone for the insight! I did fail to mention I had been interning for the past 4 months, for free sadly because that is what I could do. I am around Lansing, MI which has nothing on anyone (the college eliminated our program, the only one within 70 miles because they would rather have computer nerds and McDonald's than GOOD FOOD), literally a classmate of mine with no more experience than myself, was asked to be an executive Sous at the baseball stadium in the VIP kitchen(not concessions) so when I say that I mean no disrespect to current sous chefs who bust tail. I know darn well I won't be a sous chef in any DECENT restaurant without experience. However getting that experience at my age with the ages of my kids is hard. I like the work in progress title.

 

Now I will say that I don't believe you have to work in a restaurant for ten years to earn the title because pastry chefs (my first choice) do not. I don't desire to work the line at this time. To put it bluntly our program at school was nothing compared to most others, I don't feel I even tasted enough different foods to be a professional chef or owner. I know I have enough knowledge and I definitely have networking and people skills as i am a blogger as well. I can make money. I can call myself a chef, but there are very many levels, a line cook is a chef de partie that is still a chef, just not the executive. I am a prep and line cook right now at the job I intern at. But its the very BEGINNING. I guess it all comes down to what I consider acceptable. I will most definitely stay up to date on my ACF certifications, and I know I have to learn more. hands on. I have been working just not a paid job, so i have a little experience now and definitely know the business side (the answer to a question above i will earn a business assoc).
 

I guess my final question is more of an opinion, since I stated I don't really want to be an executive chef at this time, pastry chef, personal chef or catering interest me) Do you as a whole feel that anything less than balls t the wall burned out bleeding working on the line disqualifies one from the chef title?

post #12 of 30

Relax, a chef is nothing more than a chief, the one in charge, the manager.

 

The term, IMHO, has been corrupted to mean something different in some eyes, mostly having to do with excellence at cooking, whether savory or sweet.

 

For me, and I think a large number of culinary practitioners, it is simply a job title that does not necessarily relate to culinary skills. It is possible to be a chef without having exemplary culinary skills, just darned good management skills!

 

From Escoffier on, it simply means the one in charge of ????, much like the military uses Sergent, the more stripes, the more responsibility.

 

If you are in charge, you are the chef of whatever you are in charge of. IMHO.

 

Now, understand, that is the viewpoint of one American and may differ from our cousins across the pond, either east or west crazy.gif

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #13 of 30

i was told by a european chef that i had in cooking school "we are all just cooks".  the title of chef is what your peers see you as, and you have to earn this title not have it given to you because you are the only one around.  i think you should continue to work in kitchens seeing real professional chefs at work and reread you blog in one year time and see if you still want to call yourself a chef.

post #14 of 30

Well said Pete.

post #15 of 30

Instead of worrying what to call yourself, I would do some soul searching into what kind of career you want.  You say you have young kids and that working the line is really not what you want to do (for now).  Get a game plan, figure out what is good for you and your family and then go pursue it.  Once you have a plan, you can then start pulling together the old resume and pounding the pavement for that first job. 

post #16 of 30

Call yourself whatever you like.  Despite what the many professional chefs on CT say, it isn't illegal or even misleading for any cook to call herself a chef.  They and their profession deserve respect, but you don't disrespect them or it by using the word "chef" as it's commonly used. 

 

If you're uncomfortable calling yourself a chef, call yourself something else.  "I'm a cook" has a nice ring to it.

 

If you want to say, "I'm a chef, but..." and add a bunch of caveats, do that.  But I warn you, no one really cares.   

 

In the greater scheme of things what you call yourself matters a lot less than if you can cook pancakes. 

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #17 of 30

I am currently the Chef (by title and responsibility) at an Indian Casino.

I was recently a saute' cook, or line cook, at a fine dining establishment.

I've been a dishwasher, a prep cook, a line cook, a sous chef, an executive sous chef, an executive chef and a kitchen manager in my culinary career.

You know what I prefer to be called?

 

Jim.

Just Jim.

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #18 of 30

In Canada, you must complete an apprenticeship, whereupon you receive certification as a "Red Seal Cook."

To become a "Chef," you must be able to do the following (good luck....):

 

 

Certified Chef de Cuisine (CCC)

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

 

The Canadian Culinary Institute, under the auspices of the Canadian Culinary Federation, administers the Certified Chef de Cuisine program. The program is recognized by the Canadian Tourism Human Resources Council with its network of partnering agencies and associations throughout Canada. Human Resources Development Canada helped establish the original program in the mid 1970's.

 

The CCC professional designation is the highest rung in the career ladder for cooks in Canada. It represents an acknowledgment of skills and experience through participation in a training program. The CCI works jointly with colleges to deliver and evaluate course work to candidates. Local branches of the federation mentor and coordinate the program. The requisite skills and knowledge are identified in the National Standards for Professional Cooks 1997. The program is well established and is supported by a network of branch organizations of the CCCFCC. Contact the branch nearest you to determine when the next program is being delivered.


The CCC Program

The program is constantly reviewed and upgraded to maintain currency and relevance in today's changing market.

 

Successful completion of the program consists of three components:

  • Theory classes and a comprehensive theory examination
  • Practical Exam Day 1 – Menu Development
  • Practical Exam Day 2 – Menu Preparation and Execution

 

Modifications were made in 1997 to establish the following theory program:

  • Cost Controls
  • Human Resources Management
  • Menu Planning
  • Nutrition

 

In 2005 the revised practical exam was implemented.

 

While it is allowed to challenge the examination process without taking the courses, the success rate is very low. Classes are preparatory in nature and are designed to cover the material that the candidate must master for a successful challenge.

 

We strongly encourage that course work for these components are delivered on an accredited basis in cooperation with local colleges. The local branch of the CCFCC will process the application and recommend these and perhaps other classes to be taken. Documentation of successful completion of equivalent training may allow for "credit" for some classes through prior learning assessments. The candidate is still required to sit the final comprehensive theory examination and achieve a minimum of 70%.

 

The second component in achieving the designation is the writing and costing of a six‐course menu (Practical Exam Day 1), which must be passed with a minimum of 70% prior to proceeding to Day 2.

 

The final component is the preparation and execution of the Day 1six‐course menu (Practical Exam Day 2) with mandated skills that must be displayed (70% minimum pass required also).

 

Pre‐requisites:

Candidates must provide documentation of the following:

  • Red Seal certification. 5 years work experience POST Red Seal certification. * See note.
  • During 5 years of employment after certification, a minimum of 2 years as an employee supervisor, working on the management team in the kitchen.
  • Food Handlers Certificate (i.e., Advanced Food Safe, Section 43 Certificate, Serve Safe).
  • Current membership in the Canadian Federation of Chefs and Cooks (with a noted exception, fees in lieu of membership.)
  • A current resume.

Note: Should a candidate posess International Certification Papers equivalent to the Red Seal certification, these candidates will be processed and adjudicated on a case‐by‐case basis.


Fees:

There is currently a $510.00 registration fee payable to the CCI for the certification process. Non‐CCFCC members may apply and register to complete the program for a fee of $1020.00 (subject to change). The CCI will issue a tax receipt upon successful completion of the program. Colleges/Trainers will assess fees for  course work, including the practical exam. By offering accredited courses, there are some tax benefits. Individuals may fund themselves, receive support from employers and/or the local branch may assist in raising the necessary funds. Total cost is ranging from $1500.00 to $3000.00 depending on region, logistics and other factors.

 

Examinations:

  • For successful completion of the designation, there are three examination components all of which must be passed with a 70% minimum.
  • Each theory component will have its own assignments and tests. These will be administered by the delivering college/trainer as part of their course requirements.
  • The CCI will administer a comprehensive theory exam through the local branch or an appointed proctor. Seventy (70%) percent is the minimum grade accepted for this exam.
  • The practical component consists of two days of examination. Day 1 is an “office day” where the menu is written, standard recipes are prepared and costed and food requisitions are written.
  • Day 2, the “kitchen day” of the practical exam consists of the preparation and execution of the Day 1 menu.

Practical Exam Day 1

 

Menu Development:

The candidate will prepare a six‐course menu for four (4) covers from a provided ingredient list to the parameters following:

  • Selling Price: $70.00 (exclusive of breads and rolls, coffee, taxes, gratuities and spirits)
  • Desired Food Cost: 32%
  • Amount of food to be served: 32 to 34 ounces
  • Cream will be allowed in 2 courses; 4 courses must be without cream

 

Courses Served:

  1. Appetizer
  2. Soup
  3. Fish
  4. Salad or Sorbet
  5. Principle Plate
  6. Dessert

 

 

You must display, at minimum, the following skills:

  • Deboning of meats and/or poultry
  • Filleting of fish
  • Carving or turning of vegetables or potatoes
  • Principal plate to show 3 cooking methods one of which is a ‘braise1’ (meat, poultry or vegetable2)

o Note: For the purpose of this exam a confit will be considered braising

  • Dessert to have the following components; a pastry, a filling, a sauce, and a garnish of sugar (including

fondant) or chocolate OR a soufflé (hot or cold) served with sabayon (hot or cold as appropriate)

  • A clarification for consommé OR a moussiline forcemeat.
  • A glazed sauce not based on butter sauces. (I.e. a Velouté egg: Coquille ‘St. Jacques’) OR a beurre blanc (or beurre rouge if appropriate)
  • Piping skills – with piping bag or paper coronet
  • Appropriate garnishing for all courses based on classic and contemporary culinary and gastronomic rules.

 

The candidate is allowed to bring in one ingredient that is not on the list if they choose. The ingredient must be written into the standard recipes and costed at a fair market value.

 

 

 

Note: The menu, standard recipes and requisitions must pass with 70% in order to proceed to Day 2


The menu is a sample of the expectation of menu writing style and format. Only 4 courses are shown for legibility. You will be expected to write a 6‐course menu for the exam.

 

Below is the format of the standard recipe used for the program. When you write the menu the methodology of the recipe is written for a professional.

 

Both menu writing and completion of the standard recipe are covered in the theory modules.


Evaluation of Menu Development component: The Menu is evaluated as follows:

 

Presentation – Clarity                                                           Marks

Overall Appearance & legibility                                                         5

Proper spacing of courses                                                                  5

Writing is clear and concise                                                               5

Layout & order                                                                                    5

Wording                                                                                             Marks

Proper use of terminology                                                                  5

Repetition of names, preparation & others                                       5

Wording allows visualization of the dish                                            5

Language is appropriate and consistent                                            5

Spelling                                                                                               Marks

Capital letters                                                                                     5

Grammar                                                                                            5

Punctuation                                                                                         5

Spelling                                                                                               5

 

Use and balance of the four food groups

 

5

Use and balance of the components of taste and texture

 

5

Progression (lightest à heaviest, finish with finest)

 

5

Seasonally appropriate

 

5

Takes advantage of regional products

 

5

Reflects current styles

5

 

Reflects creativity

 

5

 

Gastronomy                                                                                       Marks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost                                                                                                     Marks

Reflects budgeted food cost and selling price                                   5

the standard recipes and requisitions submitted along with the menu are meticulously checked for accuracy to the following criteria:

 

 

 


Notes:

The menu, recipes and requisitions submitted on Day 1 may be submitted electronically. A standard recipe Excel spreadsheet will be provided (candidate must enter the formulas) as will a blank menu Word file. If the candidates choose to use their own standard recipe it must follow the format of the standard recipe used in the program. This is strictly optional and the deliverer of the program and the CCI are under no obligation to provide computers for this. The candidate may supply his own laptop.

 

MS‐Word and MS‐Excel are the only acceptable formats. Hand written work is always acceptable but must be legible.

 

 

 

On your own time, you will outline a production schedule that will be posted in your work area on Day 2 of the exam


Preparing for the Practical Examination Day 2:

It is recommended that after the menu writing and costing component are completed but prior to the cooking component, all candidates assemble with their assigned apprentice and tour facilities.

 

Equipment not available will be your responsibility to provide ‐ this should only entail some small wares or specialty equipment. All candidates must agree on what is being brought in and it becomes common to all. The lead evaluator's ruling shall be final.

 

The menu cannot be changed. It must be presented as written. Anything you bring in is subject to inspection in order to maintain fairness to everyone.

 

The Apprentice:

Candidates will be assigned an apprentice to assist them. You cannot use an apprentice who works or has been employed by you. The local CCI chair will endeavour to provide candidates with quality apprentices of similar ability.

 

The candidate has the right to request an alternate apprentice prior to entering the kitchen. If a suitable replacement cannot be found the candidate may a) use the originally assigned apprentice after discussing with the lead examiner the reasons for wanting an alternate b) withdraw from the examination with no penalty.  The written menu, recipes and requisitions will stand until the candidate can complete Day 2.

 

 

 

We encourage branches to organize a final group practice the week before the exam to allow you to meet your apprentice and assess their capabilities. You must assign meaningful tasks and are expected to coach them during the test. Professionalism is required. We do not pay them for this experience but suggest you provide a token of your appreciation to them.

 

The lead evaluator will provide the time lines to you for presentation of the various courses of the menu.


Evaluation of Day 2 and weighing of marks are done as follows:

 

Kitchen Marking (50 % of final mark)

  • 20% Application of Technical Skills
  • 20% Mise‐en‐place and Organization
  • 20% Communication and Use of Apprentice
  • 20% Sanitation and Cleanliness of Workstation
  • 10% Waste and Product Handling
  • 5% Use of Equipment
  • 5% Professionalism

 

Six Course Menu Execution (50 % of final mark)

  • 10% Timing
    • On Time within a 2 minute window (0 to 2 min.) = 10
    • Up to 1 minute late (2 to 3 minutes) = 8.5
    • 1 to 2 minutes late (3 to 4 minutes) = 7
    • 2 to 3 minutes late (4 to 5 minutes) = 5.5
    • 3+ minutes late (5+ minutes) = 0
  • 10% Temperature
    • Properly hot or cold (appropriate temperature for service) = 10 o Adequately hot or cold (above 140F/60C or below 40F/4C) = 7 o Improperly hot or cold (between 140F/60C and 40F/4C) = 0
  • 40% Presentation
  • 40% Taste

 

Note:

Evaluation of presentation and taste carry a certain amount of subjectivity therefore each candidate will be examined by three (3) examiners. “Au courant” presentation is the expectation and samples of suitable work can be shown to you during the program.

 

References for culinary preparations and techniques are as follows:

  • Larousse Gastronomies
  • Le Guide Culinaire
  • Herring’s Encyclopedia
  • La Repertoire
  • The Professional Chef

The flavour and seasoning levels expected are commensurate with the standard for a certification of this kind. Final tabulation of marks will be done immediately following the dessert presentation after which all

candidates will be debriefed individually as part of the evaluation. Marks are not given, a “pass” or a “fail” may given at the discretion of the lead examiner on examination day. Official notification of challenge status will be given in writing with in 7 business days along with a detailed synopsis.


In the event of an unsuccessful challenge:

  1. The candidate may request a meeting with the lead examiner to have a discussion regarding the results.

The purpose of this discussion is to clarify any points that may not be clear in the written synopsis only. To reiterate, this is not an appeal process. Examiner’s decisions are final.

 

  1. The candidate may re‐challenge the practical exam after ninety (90) days if there is an examination being held. Neither the CCI nor the local branch is under any obligation to provide a make up exam.
    • At the re‐challenge of the practical exam both Day 1 and Day 2 must be completed
    • The examination can be taken anywhere in Canada it is being offered.
    • The candidate will be re‐examined by different examiners.

 

Should you be unsuccessful in your challenge to the practical exam, the written synopsis is intended to give you a blueprint for a successful re‐challenge. We recommend a six to 12 month interval before re‐challenging. We have found that the success rate dramatically improves as this time period gives the candidate adequate time to develop and hone the necessary skills.


Learning Outcomes for Theory Classes:

The Culinary knowledge component has been replaced with Nutrition, however a modified version of it has proved successful at some branches. Although not core, many candidates have benefited from seminar type sessions concentrating on practical skills i.e.: Pastry garnishes, plating techniques, black box practices. Each branch can organize these professional upgrading sessions as required. Non‐candidates may benefit too.

 

Culinary Knowledge:

It is recommended that this component be modified from its present outcomes based on general knowledge of cooking terms and techniques. The rationale for this change is that the test items for this area are essentially a retesting of the journeyperson exam; and this is considered a pre‐requisite.

 

The content of this area could be more practically oriented. It is proposed that there be a nine hour (3 X 3hrs) dessert preparation, garnishing and plating/presentation section. A further eleven hours of skill/black box practice sessions would be added to the nine hours. Two practice sessions (where perhaps the candidates could provide the materials) could be conducted with a critique built in. These sessions would help prepare the candidates for the practical examination format. It may also allow for the candidate to have an opportunity to work with an appointed apprentice so that all candidates would be generally familiar with the strengths/weaknesses of the apprentice group. The critique could be facilitated with past CCI candidates and other Chefs in the area who have experience with evaluating Hot Kitchen work.

 

The opportunity for mentoring would be a valuable addition to the program and a way for CCC accredited Chefs to share with and encourage others.


Cost Controls

 

Rationale

Why is it important for you to learn this principle?

The ability to forecast, control and manage costs is essential to the viability of an operation. All team players have a responsibility to adhere to the systems in place. Standards will vary from operation to operation but the intent is the same to ensure a profit.

 

Learning Outcome

When you complete this module you will be able to...

Implement, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of cost control systems and take corrective action when required.

 

Learning Objectives

Here is what you will be able to do when you complete each step.

  1. Use an operating budget to forecast performance benchmarks.
  2. Monitor inventory levels and place a value on inventory.
  3. Calculate food costs for a restaurant.
  4. Establish energy conservation measures.
  5. Establish labor cost controls.
  6. Establish production and serving controls.
  7. Receive, store and issue products in accordance with established standards.
  8. Define terminology and concepts associated with cost control systems and the budget process used by food service operations.
  9. Calculate actual costs, analyze the variances, prescribe corrective actions and evaluate the outcome.
  10. Establish purchasing procedures for the procurement of products.

 

Prerequisite

Numerical skills involving percent, decimals and fractions. A working knowledge of spreadsheets will be an asset.

 

Performance Evaluation

To show that you have mastered this task here is what you will be asked to do:

  • Assignments and a summary exam.
  • Certification bodies incorporate elements of this course in their exams.

OBJECTIVE 1

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Use an operating budget to forecast performance benchmarks.

 

Learning Material

  1. Identify and categorize costs as fixed, variable and semi‐variable in accordance to generally accepted accounting practices.
  2. Calculate the break‐even point from a given operating budget in terms of sales volume.
  3. Explain the relevance of the contribution margin.
  4. Given a guest check average; calculate the break‐even point in terms of covers.
  5. Explain how the operating budget affects allowable expenses.
  6. Explain the factors considered in calculating projected sales levels:
    • sales histories
    • current factors
    • economic variables
    • derived demand
  7. Explain how cost levels are projected.
  8. Rationalize the concept "Profit is a cost".

 

OBJECTIVE 2

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Monitor inventory levels and place a value on inventory.

 

Learning Material

  1. Define the five components of a minimum / maximum inventory control system:
    • safety level
    • maximum level
    • usage rate
    • lead‐time
    • quantity and order point
  2. Identify problems that occur as a result of over and under ordering.
  3. Identify three important goals of an effective storage program.
  4. Explain storage control.
  5. Define inventory turnover and how it is calculated.
  6. Differentiate between physical and perpetual inventory systems.
  7. Explain the bin card system.
  8. Discuss the application of computer technology in inventory control.    ‐
  9. Differentiate between the FIFO, LIFO, actual purchase price, weighted average and the latest purchase price methods of inventory valuation.
  10. Explain the ABC inventory system.

Calculate food costs for a restaurant.

 

Learning Material

  1. Define 'cost of sales'.
  2. Identify the elements included in food cost.
  3. Identify the elements excluded from food costs and categorize them.
  4. Describe 'direct' and 'stores' food costs.
  5. Differentiate between daily and to‐date food costs.
  6. Rationalize the statement 'A high food cost percentage can be acceptable'.
  7. Calculate recipe costs and portion costs.
  8. Calculate daily and to‐date food costs.

 

OBJECTIVE 4

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Establish energy conservation measures.

 

Learning Material

  1. Outline the rationale for energy conservation.
  2. Differentiate between direct and indirect energy costs.
  3. Identify potential energy savings in a restaurant kitchen.
  4. Calculate the savings of implementing one of your identified measures for saving energy.
  5. Discuss the benefits to society for adopting an energy conservation program.

 

OBJECTIVE 5

When you complete this objective you will be able to…

Establish labor cost controls.

 

Learning Material

  1. Identify the elements that are included in labor costs.
  2. Discuss the impact of benefits on labor costs.
  3. Calculate turnover rate from given material.
  4. Establish costs associated with turnover of labor.
  5. Rationalize the use of:
    • Part‐time employees full time / permanent employees
    • Split shifts
  6. Develop staffing ratios for a kitchen.
  7. Determine the number of full time equivalents relative to total staff working in your operation.
  8. Discuss the following scheduling terms and concepts:
    • Master schedule
    • Shift schedule
    • Staggered schedule
    • Alternate work schedules
  9. Discuss the use of over‐time in relation to controlling labor costs.
  10. Identify productivity measures that can be utilized in a kitchen. How do they relate to management of human resources?
  11. Discuss how productivity and quality interact.

Establish production and serving controls.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

1.   Collect samples of historical records, standard recipes, production schedules and cash register reports and compare with colleagues' samples.

 

Learning Material

  1. Describe the purposes and goals of production planning
  2. Describe the purpose of historical records in planning for the future.
  3. Use a Times Series model (moving average) to forecast sales of an item.
  4. Develop standard recipes for menu items.
  5. Establish portion sizes for standardized recipes.
  6. Identify four concerns in controlling the transfer of products from production to serving staff
  7. Describe the roles of an expediter and food controller.
  8. Describe the role of the pre‐check register in production and serving control systems.
  9. Describe the benefits of integrated pre‐check systems in the control process.

 

OBJECTIVE 7

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Receive, store and issue products in accordance with established standards.

 

Learning Material

  1. Explain the role of purchasing specifications on the receiving process.
  2. Identify the actions (steps) that are part of receiving.
  3. Identify storage requirements for fresh, frozen, dry and timed products.
    • Refer to regulations
  4. Explain stock rotation.
  5. Outline security issues in storerooms and possible remedies.
  6. Compare stock issuing procedures for several operations.
    • Requisitions versus self‐serve.

Define terminology and concepts associated with cost control systems and the budget Process used by food service operations.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Discuss with colleagues the philosophy of their organizations regarding controls and the systems utilized.

 

Learning Material

  1. Define the following terms / concepts:

‐Control                                         ‐cost of sales

‐Net profit                                     ‐gross profit

‐Contribution margin                    ‐fixed cost

‐Variable cost                                ‐semi‐variable cost

‐Food cost                                      ‐labor cost

‐Overhead                                     ‐income statement

‐Breakeven point                          ‐portion control

‐Purchase specification                 ‐purchase order

‐Variance                                      ‐operating budget

‐Forecast sheets                            ‐inventory

‐Sell price                                      ‐mark‐up

‐Profit centre                                ‐cost centre

‐Balance sheet                              ‐yield percentage

‐Ideal cost                                     ‐standard recipe

‐FIFO                                              ‐inventory turnover

‐LIFO                                              ‐labor turnover

‐TQM Total Quality Management

  1. Describe the role of a food manager.
  2. Explain the relationship between actual and ideal food costs.
  3. Explain how fixed and variable costs are categorized.
  4. Justify the concept of treating profit as a cost.
  5. Rationalize the relative importance of food cost percentage versus contribution margin.
  6. Identify the elements of food costs that are allocated to other budget areas.
  7. Differentiate between a balance sheet and an income statement.
  8. Explain why control is an important part of a management system.
  9. Differentiate between profit and cost centres.
  10. Discuss Total Quality Management (TQM) and its impact on management functions.
  11. Explain the concept of the menu being the primary control of a food service operation

Calculate actual costs, analyze the variances, ~ corrective actions and evaluate the outcome.

 

Learning Material

  1. Explain the concept "ideal costs".
  2. Calculate actual costs from materials provided.
  3. Explain the following causes of variances:
    • Waste
    • Portion control
    • Theft, loss or breakage
    • Menu mix
    • Price changes
    • Volume fluctuations
    • Productivity
    • Over‐time
    • Maintenance and repairs
  4. Suggest actions to counter or correct causes of variances.
  5. Explain the cyclical nature of the budgeting process.

 

OBJECTIVE 10

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Establish purchasing procedures for the procurement of products.

 

Learning Material

  1. Explain the purchasing process in step form.
  2. Explain the role of ethics in purchasing.
  3. Compare examples of purchase order forms and identify the common elements.
  4. Differentiate between formal and informal purchasing.

Human Resources Management

 

Rationale

Why is it important for you learn this principle?

An effective workforce is essential to an operations success. Recruitment, selection, orientation, training, scheduling, monitoring or employee performance & history and termination all contribute to retaining competent employees.

 

Learning Outcome

When you complete this module you will be able to...

Demonstrate performance of Human Resource Management tasks including recruitment, interview techniques orientation, performance appraisal and termination

 

Learning Objectives

Here is what you will be able to do when you complete each step.

  1. Write job descriptions for positions in a food service operation.
  2. Recruit employees for positions on your team.
  3. Practice interview techniques.
  4. Select the best candidate to join the team.
  5. Conduct an orientation for a new team member.
  6. Train team members for enhanced job performance.
  7. Develop work schedules.
  8. Conduct employee performance appraisals.
  9. Support employee professional development.
  10. Maintain a record of employment history.
  11. Describe the process for terminating the employ of an individual.

 

Prerequisite

None

 

Performance Evaluation

To show that you have mastered this task; here is what you will be asked to do:

  • Assignments, role‐play and a summative exam.
  • The material covered will be re‐examined as part of Certification requirements that are established by outside agencies.

OBJECTIVE 1

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Write job descriptions for positions in a food service operation.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

Write a complete job description for a position in your establishment / place of employment. It must include:

  1. Job title
  2. Summary of duties
  3. Skills required
  4. Physical requirements (demands)
  5. Performance standards (tasks)
  6. Supervisor's title
  7. Required and preferred experience

 

Learning Material

  1. List examples of job titles used in restaurant kitchens.
  2. Identify the components of a job description.
  3. Compose a job description and review it with the class.
  4. Create or review job descriptions at your establishment. Ensure that they are observable and measurable.

 

OBJECTIVE 2

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Recruit employees for positions on your team.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

I.          Review application forms for compliance to Human Rights Legislation.

2.         Compare your advertisement to classmates and to newspaper I magazine examples.

 

Learning Material

1.         Identify five reliable methods of recruitment and note the strengths and weaknesses for each.

  1. Compose a newspaper advertisement for a Line Cook
  1. Describe the role of the application form in screening.
  2. 1dentify information that cannot be asked of an existing or potential employee.
  3. Identify screening questions that conform to Human Rights Legislation

6.         State the value and implications of reference checking.


Practice interview techniques.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Compose three open questions and state what the purpose I outcome is.
  2. Compose three closed questions and state what the purpose I outcome is.
  3. Discuss assumptions that are made based on appearance and mannerisms.
  4. Practice interviewing colleagues.

 

Learning Material

  1. Describe three purposes for conducting interviews.
  2. Differentiate between structured, unstructured and group interviews.
  3. Identify four other types of interviews that are a part of human resource ‐management.
  4. 4. Describe how to 'set the stage' for a successful interview.
  5. Determine the role of prepared questions.
  6. Differentiate between open and closed questions.
  7. Identify six factors (verbal and nonverbal) that can be learned about an individual before and during an interview (in addition to the prepared questions).
  8. State the reasons for using a checklist and taking notes during the interview.

 

OBJECTIVE 4

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Select the best candidate to join the team.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Discuss the imp6rtance of an employee 'fitting in'.
  2. When is a practical assessment needed?
  3.  

1.

Review interview notes and evaluate candidate’s temperament, team

 

 

Orientation and potential fit into your organization.

2.

Identify the role of a practical assessment.

3.

Assess the candidates present skill level against job requirements.

4.

Discuss how compensation, labor relations and training affect hiring.

~

5.

Select the best candidate for the job.

 

 

Discuss the value of knowing training requirements for a potential employee. Learning Material

Conduct an orientation for a new team member.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Review your operations Orientation procedures.
  2. Interview long‐term and new employees concerning the effectiveness of their orientation process.
  3. Discuss 'induction' situations that co‐workers engage in.

 

Learning Material

  1. Explain the purpose of an orientation program.
  2. Justify a systematic approach versus a non‐structured one.
  3. Identify the components of an orientation kit I employee handbook. Topics include:
    • Department functions
    • Duties and responsibilities of team members
    • Pay and benefits
    • Rules and procedures
    • Tour of facility
  4. Rationalize the value of feedback and evaluation.
  5. Explain the concept of ‘induction training’' that peers provide.
  6. Explain how various communication styles enhance or impede the orientation of new team members.
  7. Discuss the causes of employee turnover.

 

OBJECTIVE 6

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Train team members for enhanced job performance.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Discuss the various roles a trainer may play.
  2. Discuss how factors such as performance standards, peer training, lecturing,
  3. Feedback and avoidance of difficult Issues affect the value of training.
  4. Participate in a training session with colleagues and discuss its effectiveness.
  5. Practice using media equipment.

 

Learning Material

  1. State the purpose of training.
  2. Identify four training styles and a purpose each is most suited for.
  3. Identify five ways of dealing with nervousness.
  4. Identify barriers to effective learning and how to overcome them.
  5. List twelve practices that will enhance effective interpersonal communication.
  6. Justify cross training of staff.
  7. Develop a process to ensure training achieves the desired results.
  8. Outline the structure of a training session.
  9. Identify and select suitable visual and media aids.
  10. Conduct a training session.
  11. Solicit evaluation feedback

Develop work schedules.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Review your operations staff schedule and evaluate it against balancing all the factors pertinent to it.
  2. Discuss with colleagues how personal emergencies are handled. (Contingency Plans in their establishments)
  3. Discuss the concept that scheduling is both an art and science.

 

Learning Material

  1. Identify the types of schedules used in an operation.
  2. List four factors and their effects on assessing workload needs.
  3. Explain how the following factors affect staff scheduling:

  • Individual strengths and experiences
  • Vacations
  • Collective agreements
  • Budget productivity, over‐time)
  • Workers Compensation
  • Develop a staff work schedule.

 

OBJECTIVE 8

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Conduct employee performance appraisals.


  • Employee circumstances
  • Labor and liquor legislation
  • Operating requirements
  • Personal preference
  • Training needs

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Discuss the importance of well‐written job description in relation to performance appraisal.
  2. Discuss the need to plan for performance.
  3. Compare appraisal systems and forms with colleagues.
  4. Discuss the concept of 'positive discipline'.

 

Learning Material

  1. Describe the purpose of employee performance planning and appraisal benefits and impact)
  2. List ten elements that may be considered in an evaluation of performance.
  1. Identify four methods for evaluation of employee performance.
  1. Define the halo effect' and describe how it can influence evaluation.
  2. Explain the effect personal bias may have on an appraisal.
  3. Describe procedures that will ensure the appraisal process is objective and fair.
  4. Describe how to conduct an appraisal interview.
  5. Outline the requirements for conducting an appraisal interview that requires employee improvement.
  6. State the reasons for maintaining a written record of performance appraisal interviews.
  1. Outline the three issues to be addressed in closing the interview.
  2. Outline how to deal with substance abuse situations.

Support employee professional development.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Review your company's Professional Development policy.
  2. Discuss with colleagues how to motivate towards development activities.
  3. Discuss the issue of compensation as it relates to professional development.

 

Learning Material

  1. Describe the benefit of professional development activities.
  2. Rationalize 'leading by example' as it relates to professional development/ career planning.
  3. Outline methods to encourage professional development.
  4. Differentiate between relevant and personal training.

 

OBJECTIVE 10

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Maintain a record of employment history.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Review the content of your employee file.
  2. Discuss the possible outcomes of not maintaining accurate and appropriate
  3. Employee files.

 

Learning Material

  1. Describe the purpose for maintaining a file on individual employees.
  2. Itemize the material that should be maintained in the file.
  3. Rationalize the need to disclose the contents of an employee file to the individual.
  4. Identify time constraints effecting employee records.
  5. Discuss the need for confidentiality.

Describe the process for terminating the employ of an individual.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

 

  1. Discuss the concept 'dismiss with dignity'.
  2. Discuss possible reactions to a dismissal and how they should be handled

‐By the individual

‐By the team members

 

Learning Material

  1. Outline the concept of the 'Discipline Process'.
  2. State the objectives of positive discipline.
  3. Outline the steps in progressive discipline.
  4. State the guidelines for administering discipline in a fair and equitable way.
  5. 1dentify employment standards that must be considered.
  6. Identity the role of unions in employee discipline.
  7. Consider the employees point of view.
  8. Review the terms of employment.
  9. Determine how the notice period will be handled.
  10. Describe what is meant by 'dismissed for just’ cause.
  11. List violations that frequently require dismissal and violations that require progressive discipline.
  12. Describe how to prepare for and stage a 'termination interview'.
  13. Describe and define andexit interview'.

Menu Planning

 

Rationale

Why is it important for you to learn this principle?

The menu is the single most critical element affecting a restaurant. The items offered, how they are presented and the selling price all affect the customer's acceptance and repeat business.

 

Learning Outcome

When you complete this module you will be able to...

Create a variety of menus that meet the needs of the establishment and the client.

 

Learning Objectives

Here is what you will be able to do when you complete each step.

  1. Define terminology associated with menu planning and design.
  2. Use strategies to market the menu to achieve operational goals.
  3. Write menus targeted to specific uses and / or clients.
  4. Price menus using the most appropriate method for the situation.
  5. Analyze sales data to determine if budget goals are being achieved.

 

Prerequisite

Thorough knowledge and experience in food preparation techniques and styles.

 

Performance Evaluation

To show that you have mastered this task; here is what you will be asked to do:

  • Assignments and a summary exam.
  • Elements of this course are incorporated into certification exams by external bodies.

 

General Activities

Researching trade publications, collecting menus from your own and friends' travel are essential to staying current with the trends and styles of today as well as respecting the classical roots of cuisine.


OBJECTIVE 1

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Define terminology associated with menu planning and design.

 

Learning Material

  1. Define the following terms:
    • Menu
    • A la Carte
    • Table d’hôte
    • Static menu
    • Cyclical menu
    • Single use menu
    • Menu engineering
    • Degustation
  2.  

×

Classical

‐nouvelle

×

Vegan

vegetarian

×

French

Asian

×

‐Southwest

‐Fusion

×

Mediterranean

comfort

×

Health conscious

‐spa

×

Cajun

heart smart

×

Cholesterol reduced

‐sodium reduced

 

Explain what each of the following styles represents in relation to food:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Explain the following service styles:

×

French

Russian

×

‐Gueridon

American

×

Banquet

Family

×

Full service

‐fast food

×

‐Take out

catering

×

‐Boston Market

 

 

OBJECTIVE 2

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Use strategies to market the menu to achieve operational goals.

 

Learning Material

  1. Investigate the various layouts used in printing menus.
  2. Identify the focal point of each layout and suggest appropriate items to be placed there.
  3. Discuss various ways menus are packaged and formatted.
  4. Identify and discuss the choices of font size and style, color, art or photography, paper type and finish.
  5. Identify psychological factors affecting customer choices.

OBJECTIVE 3

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Write menus targeted to specific uses and / or clients.

 

Learning Material

1.         Describe the effects of texture, color, flavor, taste, odor and balance in selecting menu items or components.

2          Explain the importance of realistic evaluation of human and physical resources available.

  1. Outline classical and modern menu item progression.
  2. Discuss the reasons for the evolution of menu progression.
  1. Identify legal requirements in composing menu language.
  2. Identify style requirements in composing and editing menu language.

7.         Explain the role of the following in planning a menu:

‐Market study, demographics, competitive analysis, interviews, theme, trends, nutrition, food shows, product availability, price, testing and standards.

8.  Write menus to meet criteria established.

 

OBJECTIVE 4

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Price menus using the most appropriate method for the situation.

 

Learning Material

  1. Explain the relationship between price and demand for a product.
  2. Explain why different menu items are marked up more or less.
  3. Discuss how perception of value and competition impact pricing decisions.
  4. Calculate menu price by the factor pricing' method. (Mark‐up method)
  5. Calculate menu price by the 'prime cost' method.
  6. Calculate menu price by the 'actual cost' method.
  7. Define menu price by the 'prime ingredient cost' method.
  8. Calculate menu price by the 'contribution margin' method.
  9. Calculate menu price by the 'ratio pricing' method.
  10. Explain the benefits of specific prime costs versus simple prime cost.
  11. Discuss subjective pricing methods (reasonable, highest, loss leader, intuitive)

 

OBJECTIVE 5

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Analyze sales data to determine if budget goals are being achieved.

 

Learning Material

  1. Define menu mix.
  2. Explain menu engineering.
  3. Analyze sales data, plan adjustments if required, implement changes and reevaluate.

Nutrition

 

Rationale

Why is it important for you to learn this principle?

Concepts of human nutrition and their impact on health are becoming more important for the cook and chef to know. Recipe modification, food preparation and menu planning are all affected by nutritional considerations. Dietary restrictions are an ever‐increasing factor in food preparation.

 

Learning Outcome

When you complete this module you will be able to...

Apply nutrition knowledge to recipe modification, food preparation and menu planning.

 

Learning Objectives

Here is what you will be able to do when you complete each step.

  1. Explain the impact of current health trends in Canada on the hospitality I food service industry.
  2. Explain certain definitions related to nutrition and body performance.
  3. Explain the importance of protein in the diet. Develop and/or modify menus to meet the request of the consumer in this regard.
  4. Explain the impact of high fat diets on health and cooking techniques to reduce the fat content of food.
  5. Explain the important contribution carbohydrates and fiber, make too good nutrition. Write a menu that follows the recommendations for carbohydrate and fiber intake.
  6. Explain the important contribution vitamins and minerals make to good Nutrition. Explain the impact cooking techniques have on nutrient retention in food.
  7. Explain the importance of water for health.
  8. 8.   Assess a menu's nutritional balance according to Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating.
  9. Identify and explain the use of nutrient modified food products in the hospitality industry.
  10. Explain nutrition recommendations with regard to specific health concerns.
  11. Plan, prepare and serve a healthy menu.

 

Prerequisite

None

 

Performance Evaluation

To show that you have mastered this task, here is what you will be asked to do:

Class Assignments       70%

Final Exam                  30% Practical (in Class)      Optional

 

General Activities

  1. Explain the impact of current health trends in Canada on the hospitality I food service industry.
  2. Explain certain definitions related to nutrition and body performance.
  3. Explain the importance of protein in the diet. Develop and modify menus to meet the request of the consumer in this regard.
  4. Explain the impact of high fat diets on health and cooking techniques to reduce the fat content of food.
  5. Explain the important contribution carbohydrates and fiber make to good nutrition. Write a menu that follows the recommendations for carbohydrate and fiber intake.

  1. Explain the important contribution vitamins and minerals make to good nutrition. Explain the impact cooking techniques have on nutrient retention in food.
  2. Explain the importance of water for health.
  3. Assess a menu's nutritional balance according to Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating.
  4. Identify and explain the use of nutrient modified food products in the hospitality industry.
  5. Explain nutrition recommendations with regard to various health concerns.
  6. Plan, prepare and serve a healthy meal.

Explain the impact of current health trends in Canada on the hospitality / food service industry.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. List 5 health and food consumption trends in Canada in the 90's.
  2. Explain the link between lifestyle choices and wellness or illness.
  3. Outline Canada's guidelines to healthy eating.
  4. Explain the impact of the health conscious consumer on the hospitality / food service industry.

 

OBJECTIVE 2

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Explain certain definitions related to nutrition and body performance.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Define nutrition.
  2. Define nutrient and explain its role.
  3. Define essential nutrient and name the classifications of nutrients found in food.
  4. Explain three functions of food, once it has been digested.
  5. State the two methods energy is measured by and identifies which nutrients supply energy to the body.

 

OBJECTIVE 3

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Explain the importance of protein in the diet. Develop and/or modify menus to meet the request of the consumer in this regard.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Explain the main function of protein in the body.
  2. List the primary food sources of protein.
  3. List the two types of vegetarians, which foods each will or will not eat.
  4. Identify advantages of a vegetarian diet and special considerations.
  5. Explain creative ways that meat portions can be reduced, yet still appeal to customers.
  6. Develop and/or modify a menu suitable for a vegetarian customer.
  7. Research and collect recipes for vegetarian offerings.

Explain the impact of high fat diets on health and cooking techniques to reduce the fat content of food.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. List the main functions of fat in the body.
  2. List food sources of saturated, unsaturated fat and cholesterol.
  3. Explain the relationship between high fat diets and heart disease.
  4. List at least five heart healthy menu‐planning guidelines.
  5. List at least five heart healthy cooking techniques.

 

OBJECTIVE 5

When you complete this objective you will be able

Explain the important contribution carbohydrates and fiber make to good nutrition. Write a menu that follows the recommendations for carbohydrate and fiber intake.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. List the main function of carbohydrates in the body.
  2. Name the two types of carbohydrates and list food sources of each.
  3. Define soluble and insoluble fiber and list sources of each.
  4. Explain the importance of a high fiber diet.
  5. List three recommendations for carbohydrate and fiber intake.
  6. Modify a menu to increase fiber content.

 

OBJECTIVE 6

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Explain the important contribution vitamins and minerals make to good nutrition. Explain the impact cooking techniques have on nutrient retention in food.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. List general functions and food sources of vitamins (A, D, E; K, B, C) and minerals Na, Ca, Fe).
  2. Explain the ease or difficulty in receiving adequate vitamins and minerals and when vitamin/mineral supplementation is appropriate.
  3. List recommendations for storage, handling and preparation of foods that would increase nutrient retention.
  4. List ways to season food without adding a lot of salt.

Explain the importance of water for health.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. List the three functions of water in the body.
  2. List the main sources of water intake and water loss.
  3. State the recommended fluid intake per day.

 

OBJECTIVE 8

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Assess a menu's nutritional balance according to Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Explain the rationale behind Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating.
  2. Identify the five food groups and give examples of servings for each.
  3. Assess a menu's nutritional balance by comparing it to Canada's Food Guide To Healthy Eating.

 

OBJECTIVE 9

When you complete this objective you will be able to:

Identify and explain the use of nutrient modified food products in the hospitality industry.

 

Learning Activity

Complete each of the Activities listed below:

  1. Give examples of food substitutes and their uses.
  2. Read food labels for ingredients and nutrition information.
  3. Identify uses for modified food products.

 

OBJECTIVE 10

When you complete this objective you will be able to...

Explain nutrition recommendations with regard to specific health concerns.

 

Learning Activity

  1. Explain the effect caffeine and alcohol have on the body and list menu alternatives.
  2. Explain the factors the affect energy metabolism.
  3. Describe possible reasons for obesity and the recommended weight management solution.
  4. Identify menu choices suitable for a diabetic customer.
  5. List common food allergies and intolerances.
  6. Explain the gluten‐free diet.
  7. List five dietary recommendations to reduce the risk of developing cancer.
  8. Identify ways to spot a nutrition fad or fallacy.


 

post #19 of 30

yep long arse list.....

 

And yeh pete said it all...

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

Reply

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #20 of 30

I found this is the greatest of post above, Chef in Progress.,Culinary Professional ,or Culinary Graduate  I found this to be the hardest, after owning cooking in my own restaurants and , Tappy 's, completing multiple culinary schools, training and writing books on cooking before going to school. People throw that word around because they don't know or understand the terminology's of the cooking system. The general public defines,  Chef as : A chef is a person who cooks professionally for other people. Traditionally it refers to a highly skilled professional cook who is proficient in all aspects of food  preparation...

 

Your quest in just beginning, I like Chef in Progress because you are always learning,,, developing taste etc, People in our profession sometimes have a little too much ego or jackass just want to come out.  You know what you should call yourself ..Keep your self in check and continue to learn, enjoy what you do and make people happy with what you create.

 

Murph

Chef in Progress

post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Murphy View Post

 The general public defines,  Chef as : A chef is a person who cooks professionally for other people. Traditionally it refers to a highly skilled professional cook who is proficient in all aspects of food  preparation...

 

I guess I'll drag out the can-opener and start this one up again...

 

Perhaps the general public defines a "chef' as that, but I go by the real acid test.

 

Q: Who hires a "Chef"?

 

A: The employer

 

Q:What is the employer looking for in a "Chef"?

 

A: A reliable person to keep the kitchen running profitably.

 

In other words:

 

A "Cook" is judged by what they put on a plate.  If it meets/exceeds standards, the cook remains employed, if not, ..............well, you know

 

A "Chef" is judged by how well they run the kitchen, judged by how well they manage the resources given to them.  If the kitchen looses money, ........well, you know

 

O.K.......

force shields back on full power and let the flak fly...........................

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #22 of 30

I concur with FoodPump.

 

A chef is a manager of the kitchen. S/he decides:

  • What is to be produced
  • How it is to be produced
  • What will be used to produce it
  • Who does what.

 

The kitchen staff produces what the Chef wants, when the Chef wants it, in the manner the Chef has specified, from the ingredients the Chef has purchased, on the equipment the Chef has chosen, to the taste of the Chef.

 

The success of a Chef has far more to do with the Chef's management abilities than it does with the Chef's culinary virtuosity!

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #23 of 30

Im newly fresh graduate in culinary career and applied in fine dining restaurant as a kitchen staff wearing a chef's coat can i call myself a chef or not? im just a kitchen staff :confused:  some people call me a chef but i refused because im a kitchen staff only.

 

Need some clarification here?

post #24 of 30

and whats the difference between Kitchen Helper and Kitchen Staff and Commis I,II,III ? :confused:

post #25 of 30

i like to think this way...

 

A chef is the boss , the one who commands the kitchen , thus it is just a job title.

Culinary schools arent responisble for graduating chefs , but yes cooks. 

 

I like to think their are 2 types of chefs in the world. 

The one who just holds the culinary title and the one who can back up the title with experience. 

I know of chefs who are a chef at one restaurant , but if they were ever to leave that place they cant go pransing around saying there a chef ( they are cooks until given that title ) , especially when they dont know the flow or system or cooking process of another restaurant.  

 

Just a few days ago i met this 22 year old girl , who graduated culinary school worked in some restaurants , went to italy for 3 years , and came back to work as a chef. Yes , she actually stated she was a chef and was looking to hold that title in other restaurants. So we brought her in to stage for 2 days <_< couldnt supreme an orange correctly and when she finally learned how ( yes it took her some time to realize how to do it and she was doing it wrong when the peels and seeds were still attached to the oranges flesh ) she still took about 1 hour for 10 freaking oranges <_<. 

In that one hour of prep i had half my prep done and still went to go help her. 

She was literally the perfect example of new grads who think that just because they have a diploma they are a chef , dont get me wrong she knew her cooking facts , but when it came down to doing grunt work and chopping vegetables , we would have been better one our own then having her around asking for tips every 5 - 10 minutes.

Dont get me wrong im not the worlds best line cook, im young , rebelious , and immature but when it comes down to getting my station ready , sweating bullets and gaining experience in the culinary field , i know im better then half the grads coming out of school now. 

 

wells thats my 2 cents spend it how u wish....

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #26 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Princeed1988 View Post
 

and whats the difference between Kitchen Helper and Kitchen Staff and Commis I,II,III ? :confused:

 

You should have learned these terms in culinary school.

post #27 of 30
WOW.


"Vocabulary Words".






I don't think anyone should really consider speed of prep any type of qualification for anything other than being a speedy prepper. I think I could find a coupla "massage therapists" off of Cicero Ave. that could supreme an orange as fast as anyone.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I don't think anyone should really consider speed of prep any type of qualification for anything other than being a speedy prepper. I think I could find a coupla "massage therapists" off of Cicero Ave. that could supreme an orange as fast as anyone.
 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by KaiqueKuisine View Post
 

wells thats my 2 cents spend it how u wish....

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #29 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

"I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'."

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #30 of 30
Ok what about "gourmand" this discussion is getting ridiculous. lol
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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