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wants fair pay !

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi,  I just started working at a restaurant as a prep cook. In the past i have worked the cold line, the hot line, pastry, and prep.

 

Anyway, they are paying me 9/hr for this "training period"....the thing is, I am not sure how to ask the manager, or rather tell him that I expect my next paycheck to be the regular hourly, as I am working equally as the other prep cook...under limited to no supervision...

 

How could I ask him this without sounding arrogant or obnoxious?? I seriously think I deserve to be regular pay now, because i'm certainly not just standing around waaiting to be told what to do, like when you are in training...I work shifts alone!

 

I've never had this at a restaurant before, they always start me at regular pay...I don't know if this is normal elsewhere, but it just seems very unfair that i'm getting paid training pay while i'm working as a regular employee. I've been employed here almost 4 weeks....

 

any suggestions???? thanks !

post #2 of 12

Before hiring, what exactly did the manager tell you about "training wage", did he give you any time period (max amt of hours) for this to expire?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 12

IMHO, there is no such thing as "fair pay"!

 

You may ask how long you will be "training" but I certainly would not challenge the Chef.

 

You always have the option to leave.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

hi, no he was very vague "after training you'll get the regular pay" and I know it is my fault for not being assertive and asking exactly when that would be....

 

 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

no such thing as fairness in earning what your colleagues are earning for doing the same work, maybe better? I'm curious why you think that...

 

He's actually not the chef, the kitchen currenly does not have an exec. chef...he is just the manager.

 

I come across very passive and quiet and I don't want him to think he can just pay me little

under "you're training" when i'd say after the first week I was left alone....

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by no10x View Post

no such thing as fairness in earning what your colleagues are earning for doing the same work, maybe better? I'm curious why you think that...

Because "fairness" has nothing to do with pay, IMHO. Performance has a lot to do with pay! The bottom line? The $$$ left by customers is the major factor in determining pay! Unless you are working for the government, a charity, or something similar, you are not being paid out of the "goodness" of the boss.

 

Quote:

 

He's actually not the chef, the kitchen currenly does not have an exec. chef...he is just the manager.

Excuse me? What do you think a chef is, if not a manager? And, I'm not familiar with any single kitchen with an Executive Chef, a Chef yes. For me, an Executive Chef is responsible for multiple kitchens. In my mind, a chef IS a manager who happens to be able to cookl

 

Quote:
I come across very passive and quiet and I don't want him to think he can just pay me little

under "you're training" when i'd say after the first week I was left alone....

Now I'm going to be rather brusk here, you've been there one week and you know better than the manager whether your training is over, is that correct? From what you posted, you do not even know how long you were to be trained or, it sounds like, what the goal of the training is or what you will be paid after training.

 

I think you need to ask the manager

  • a) how you are doing, and
  • b) how long should you expect to be trained, and
  • c) what is the goal of the training
  • d) how will you know when you will be considered trained?

 

You mentioned doing the same work or better, in whose opinion?

  • Yours?
  • Or the manager's?
  • Who is the earliest one to work?
  • Who is the last to leave?

 

My apologies, however, I'm a little bit old school. I do not believe that a new hire with a week under their belt is in any position to tell the Chef/Manager how the operation should be run or what someone should be paid.

 

Now, perhaps I'm mistaken and you actually have 2 years or more experience in a job covering the stations you listed, then the discussion needs to be refocused.

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #7 of 12

You never defined     "What is fair pay""?     Sounds to me like you jumped into this job without finding out any details which by the way is YOUR FAULT.  You might also check your attitude re.""He's just the manager""   Just?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 

by "fair pay" i mean getting paid what the girl next to me is getting paid. for doing the same amount of work.

I start my shift when the others start and I leave when they leave.

 

I don't understand how youo jumped to conclusions.....but I will clarify.

 he is a MANAGER. he is NOT a CHEF. he had nothing to do with the planning, creating, tasting of the menu.

His duties are  scheduling and payroll and ordering materials.... As I said, there is no CHEF currently because

the chef left right before I was hired.

 

And yes, I have 4+ years of experience in this particular cuisine, and no I'm not the one saying

i'm doing a good job, the other staff who check my work say so.

 

sheesh, if you read my original post, I asked how to bring up this subject with the manager without "sounding obnoxious"

I kNOW  i am at fault for not asking , I also said that.

 

I'm not telling anyone how to run anything I'm simply asking that I not be taken advantage of for my time

and hard work that I am putting in EQUAL as the others. I'm not asking to be paid the same as someone who has been there over a year.

.

Just for the REGULAR hourly that I was told.

 

post #9 of 12

Well "just the manager" (as you put it) is probably in charge of payroll so s/he is the one you'll have to discuss with.

 

Whether you appreciate it or not, the "just the manager" is your boss.

 

IMHO, your pay should be based on your performance with regards as to what the kitchen/restaurant/manager needs, not what anyone else is receiving, you are not an assembly line worker (though it may feel like that at times crazy.gif)

 

You need to sit down with "just the manager" (I'd treat him/her as if s/he was the Chef) and clearly identify:

  • When will you be "trained", and
  • When will you be receiving a raise/full pay/whatever
  • How can you speed up the process

 

If you do not like or accept the answers, give your two week notice and leave at the end of that time.

 

If you do accept the answers, put your head down and get to work. If I were in your shoes, I would be at work not less than 10 minutes before my co-workers and I'd be the last to leave, BTA, WTHDIK?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #10 of 12

no10x....I have to ask....how do you know what the other people in the kitchen are making? 

Did you ask them?

Are they telling you the truth.

 

Momma always said....never to tell anyone what you make. It's no ones business but your own.

And it always ends up making for a bad situation, and bent feelings all around.

post #11 of 12

If you don't like policies of the place or their way of doing things, Give notice and leave.. They survived before you and will keep going after you. Hell of a way to think and be , but thats the way it is. Welcome to the real world.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #12 of 12

Clarify the expectations of your employer with a sit-down.

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