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Why is my creme brulee very runny and loose? What can I do? - Page 2

post #31 of 68

I agree with you Boar...Looking at the recipe it seems like an awful lot of cornstarch.

Many countries have their own version of Creme Brulee.

In Spanish countries don't they have Flan?

Creme Caramel is a derivative as well.

post #32 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

I agree with you Boar...Looking at the recipe it seems like an awful lot of cornstarch.

Many countries have their own version of Creme Brulee.

In Spanish countries don't they have Flan?

Creme Caramel is a derivative as well.

 

Flan is Creme Caramel - not creme brulee. 

post #33 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

  • I don't like Chestnut honey. 

 

WoW!I absolutely LOVE chestnut honey. Anyway, as I said, you won't get the full robust flavor from the honey when using 1 Tbspn for 4 desserts. You'll just get the subtle flavor of chestnuts.... delicious. 

post #34 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

 

 

FF,

 

Thank you for posting your recipe. I am a big fan of chestnuts to. I am going to look around for the honey, although I am sure if I go to the Euro store they just might have it. Chestnut cream is another item I might find there. I have the puree that looks like this which I use in some of my baking. Its amazing how alot of the items that are posted on CT or are spoken about are not here. In any event I am going to find out.

This brings back some wonderful memories for me as a child. thumb.gif Petals. ps." Confit de Chataignes " ? (where is the icon with the big red heart when you need it ?)

 

Marrons.jpg

 

I'm a huge fan of chestnut. Sabaton is a great industrial brand. They also make "Creme de marrons" (I have a few tubes in my cupboard), which is good. You could maybe cook a bit of puree de marrons, which I assume is unsweetened, in a bit of light sugar syrup in order to make a quick alternative to creme de marron. 

 

And I agree with you: confit de chataignes sounds absolutely delicious even though I have absolutely no idea what it is. I'll be in France in a few months, I'll inquire then. 

post #35 of 68

I like chestnuts and chestnut desserts a great deal.  Just not enamored with chestnut honey; at least not the stuff I've tried.

 

BDL

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post #36 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

 

Flan is Creme Caramel - not creme brulee. 

 

Yes you're right....but my point is that many countries have the custard part of the recipe but call it by many names.

post #37 of 68

I found this pic off the web: Crème brûlée au confit de châtaigne

 

Creme Brulee.jpg

 

 

 

Petals
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Petals
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post #38 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

A few observations:

 

  • A lot of people in this thread seem to have a very good grasp on how to make this dessert; and they make it differently from one another.  Goes to show that there's frequently a lot of right ways to do something.
  • I'm all in favor of using a bain marie in a moderate oven; but suggest filling the bain marie with water after it's in the oven.  I'm not in favor of walking through the kitchen and dealing with opening the oven and sliding the pan in while the pan is full of water.  Water is not a creme's friend.  
  • I'm childishly fond of creme brulee.  But face it, after it's huge burst of popularity in the eighties and nineties it's become somewhat dated.  On the other hand, we saw more than a few menus of high-zoot restaurants in the NorCal wine country -- so maybe it's not dated, but "classic." 

 

BDL

 

  • Thank you for pointing that out.  There ARE a lot of right ways to make something and even though this is a dessert item which usually calls for very specific steps that need to be followed accurately it is still evident that there is more than one way to make it good.  And is it really necessary to always go back to original of the originals, siting goodness knows what sources from the baroque period?  I think I'm perfectly capable of making a simple dish without consulting ancient recipes.
  • Some people learned this the hard way ---> me blushing.gif
  • I grew up eating creme caramel and only had creme brulee for the first time about 5yrs ago.  I still prefer flan in favor of the burnt creme but do enjoy its creaminess a lot.  I am especially fond of the modern seasonal variations like pumpkin creme brulee in the fall.  Had some chocolate creme brulee recently but didn't like it much.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #39 of 68

What exactly is creme catalan? 

There are other deserts that have caramel and cream (custard) - creme caramel, latte alla portughese, i guess creme catalan - but none are like creme brulee.  There's the most beautiful picture of it in a time/life cookbook from the series "The Good Cook"- it's a very loose cream inside, made with real cream, and a glassy crust, and it's shown being broken by the spoon and the runny cream inside starting to pool around the shards of caramel.  SOOO appealing.  I tried it once, and it was more than wonderful. 

 

I still would like to know where Margcata got this recipe and how she knows this is the original one. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #40 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

my point is that many countries have the custard part of the recipe but call it by many names.

 

 

I think I understand what you mean - but I wouldn't say that a flan (aka creme caramel, they're the same thing) is "the custard part of the creme brulee by another name". In fact in France, we have both the creme brulee and the flan, and they're two different desserts. Flans typically have milk and egg whites, which creme brulee typically does not contain. Flans do not typically have a creamy texture, in fact they're closer to .... jello I guess? I can't find the English word. But anyway, very different textures. 

 

post #41 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

 

I think I understand what you mean - but I wouldn't say that a flan (aka creme caramel, they're the same thing) is "the custard part of the creme brulee by another name". In fact in France, we have both the creme brulee and the flan, and they're two different desserts. Flans typically have milk and egg whites, which creme brulee typically does not contain. Flans do not typically have a creamy texture, in fact they're closer to .... jello I guess? I can't find the English word. But anyway, very different textures. 

 

 

I wouldn't say jello because there is no gelatin in the custard apart from the egg whites.  But you're right, a good flan will be creamy and loose like a pudding almost, while flan has a firmer structure.  It stands out of the mold, while a creme brulee would surely puddle.

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post #42 of 68

When I was a child, here in the UK, we had a french-named, but I believe typically English pudding we called blancmange.  It wobbled like a jelly (jello) but was not transparent like a jelly.  It could be made from scratch (my mum did it that way) OR, like the famous (dreaded) Bird's custard, it could be bought in sachets of flavoured powder, and then prepared with hot milk, left to cool and then eaten cold.  The consistency was similar to panna cotta.

 

I had a quick look for her recipe, but can't seem to find it.  Here's a link to Pearce Duff's packet blancmange, though! http://www.mysupermarket.co.uk/tesco-price-comparison/Desserts/Pearce_Duffs_Blancmange_Strawberry_Raspberry_Chocolate_And_Vanilla_4_per_pack_146g.html

post #43 of 68

Blancmange is milk, thickened with corn starch and flavored with citrus peel, cinnamon, and -- sometimes -- almond extract or real almonds.  It's easy as heck to make.   I'll post a recipe for you in the "Recipe" thread.

 

BDL

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post #44 of 68

Thanks, BDL, but I found my Mammy's!

post #45 of 68

 

 

Apologies To The Posters On This Thread,

 

The 1st mistake, is that the  recipe I posted by accident, is Crema Catalana,

 

and yes, corn flour did exist in 1520, from Mexico.

 

Remember that Extremaduran, Spanish Gent Hernán Cortéz ?

 

Crema Catalana is made with the ingredients mentioned further up the thread: The Catalan Generalit ( Government of Catalonia ). This dessert was created on the frontier between southeastern France and province of Girona, Catalonia.

 

Have a nice wkend.

M.C.   

 

 

post #46 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by margcata View Post


 

and yes, corn flour did exist in 1520, from Mexico.

 

Remember that Extremaduran, Spanish Gent Hernán Cortéz ?

 


 

 

 

Most of us probably do remember Cortez, but I think you mentioned cornstarch, not corn flour - which is quite different. IMO, it is very unlikely that the technology to make cornstarch existed in 1520.

 

 

 

 

post #47 of 68

Well, commercially made cornstarch was probably much later, Colombochute, but if you swish ground cornmeal around in some water, drain it, and let the water evaporate and I think you'd get cornstarch.  Collect it and you might get enough to make a catalan cream, maybe.  I once read how to make potato starch  (used in many european cakes) at home - grate potatoes, wash them, let the water  evaporate, and gather it. 

 

 

But for authentic, original recipes, generally I think it's best not to declaim in certain terms something as historical or authentic and rather to say "i found this recipe that so and so says is the original" - there are many urban legends around and lots of cookbook writers who, understandably, want to make their cookbook sound cool and exciting, but most of them are not historians, and most of them, unfortunately, don;t really care what kind of false information they give as long as people buy their cookbooks.  They'll give a recipe as "the original" version of something because it gives it prestige, but there is no way to show something is the original.  The only thing we can show is that it's NOT (e.g. if we find one that we can date with certainty earlier). So if we say who told us about the recipe's originality, we don't get blamed for not having the correct information - the author we quote is responsible! Of course, if the name of the dish is different, then it's best to check that first before proclaiming anything. 

 

By the way. How may people think Marco Polo introduced pasta to Italy from China?  I believed that too, like everyone else, until i read a historian/cook who showed that there was a recipe written for pasta BEFORE Marco Polo's first trip to China.  Another beloved myth down the drain. 

Or perhaps, Marco Polo had never had it at home, and he came back and told his mother about this wonderful new dish he discovered in china and his mother said, "that's not new, Marco, Zia Colombina's been making it for years.smile.gif"

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #48 of 68

i would have though increase the protein, youve just told every possible problem related and unreated, and then pushed your own recipe :(
 

post #49 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Well, commercially made cornstarch was probably much later, Colombochute, but if you swish ground cornmeal around in some water, drain it, and let the water evaporate and I think you'd get cornstarch.  Collect it and you might get enough to make a catalan cream, maybe.  I once read how to make potato starch  (used in many european cakes) at home - grate potatoes, wash them, let the water  evaporate, and gather it. 

 

 

You have a good point here, Siduri. Still, I somehow have in mind that cornstarch is a (relatively) recent, and US-based invention.

 

As for you comments regarding the use of "traditional", I can only agree.

post #50 of 68

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

 

I think I understand what you mean - but I wouldn't say that a flan (aka creme caramel, they're the same thing) is "the custard part of the creme brulee by another name". In fact in France, we have both the creme brulee and the flan, and they're two different desserts. Flans typically have milk and egg whites, which creme brulee typically does not contain. Flans do not typically have a creamy texture, in fact they're closer to .... jello I guess? I can't find the English word. But anyway, very different textures. 

 

 

You proved my point FF....

 

In the "Food Lover's Companion" Flan is listed as Spanish in origin, and also calls "Creme Caramel" the same thing.

I am re-creating a Lebanese dinner menu for tonight. A good friend of the boss wrote a cookbook back in the 80's and in the recipes I found.........wait for it..........Creme Caramel.

Mexico has flan, although my lady friend from the southern region would argue with you about no egg yolks in the recipe. Her recipe uses goat milk and agave.

post #51 of 68

I wonder whatever happened to the original poster, the culinary student who wanted to know why his creme brulee wasn't setting.  Maybe we all chased him away with our eruditeness!smile.gif

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #52 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

my lady friend from the southern region would argue with you about no egg yolks in the recipe. 

 

I did not say there are no egg yolks in a flan recipe (I use whole eggs when making flan). I said there are no egg whites in a creme brulee. 

post #53 of 68

u wanna know a little secret from the top a michelin star chef in london told my head chef that when your boil up your cream and milk add on top of the eggs then return to clean pan of course and let it scramble then once youve let it scramble blitz it with a hand blender and seive into moulds it works amazingly :)

post #54 of 68

créme brûlée does not have cinnamon

and corn flour in it :(


Edited by ChefZoneAU - 6/21/12 at 1:10am
post #55 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

What exactly is creme catalan? 

There are other deserts that have caramel and cream (custard) - creme caramel, latte alla portughese, i guess creme catalan - but none are like creme brulee.  There's the most beautiful picture of it in a time/life cookbook from the series "The Good Cook"- it's a very loose cream inside, made with real cream, and a glassy crust, and it's shown being broken by the spoon and the runny cream inside starting to pool around the shards of caramel.  SOOO appealing.  I tried it once, and it was more than wonderful. 

 

I still would like to know where Margcata got this recipe and how she knows this is the original one. 

CREME CATALAN is creme brûlée with the addition of spices, it is not cooked in a bain marie it is baked dry the other difference is it doesn't have a caramel top :) 

post #56 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwebb37 View Post

I made a creme brulee and it is very runny and loose. I made it in a large ramekin, and my oven is set at 300 F and there are also bubbles at the top. Ive been cooking it for over 50 min now, but the recipe told me to cook for 30 min.

I make 1000 of these every 5 days I have edited the recipe so its a smaller batch about 4 brûlée its a failsafe recipe :)

 

 

CRÈME BRULÉE YIELD: 5 PORTIONS (INDIVIDUALS)

 

Ingredients Quantity

Milk (1) 100 ml

Cream 400 ml

Vanilla bean ½

Egg yolks 6 (55g eggs)

Sugar (caster) 70 g

Milk (2) 50 ml

Castor sugar as required

 

Step Method

  1. Place the milk (1), cream and split & scraped vanilla bean into a pan and warm to blood temperature.
  2. In a separate bowl, mix the egg yolks, sugar and milk (2) and slowly pour into the warm milk and cream mixture while stirring to mix thoroughly.
  3. Make light Anglaise over a Bain marie then pass the custard through a fine strainer, remove any bubbles from the surface of the brulee mix and pour into  brulee moulds
  4. Place the dishes into a deep oven tray and half fill the tray with hot water and cover with foil.
  5. Place into an oven pre-set to 110-120° c cook until set, approximately 35–45 minutes.
  6. Remove the moulds from the oven and water bath and rest outside of the fridge for 15-20 mins
  7. Cover and place the cooled crème brulee’s into the fridge to set (if refridgerated while hot they will crack.) 
  8. Dredge each custard with sugar or praline and caramelize to a deep golden brown with a flame gun or brulee iron.
post #57 of 68

I make 1000 of these every 5 days I have edited the recipe so its a smaller batch about 4 brûlée its a failsafe recipe :)

 

 

CRÈME BRULÉE YIELD: 5 PORTIONS 

 

Ingredients Quantity

Milk (1) 100 ml

Cream 400 ml

Vanilla bean ½

Egg yolks 6 (55g eggs)

Sugar (caster) 70 g

Milk (2) 50 ml

Castor sugar as required

 

Step Method

  1. Place the milk (1), cream and split & scraped vanilla bean into a pan and warm to blood temperature.
  2. In a separate bowl, mix the egg yolks, sugar and milk (2) and slowly pour into the warm milk and cream mixture while stirring to mix thoroughly.
  3. Make light Anglaise over a Bain marie then pass the custard through a fine strainer, remove any bubbles from the surface of the brulee mix and pour into  brulee moulds
  4. Place the dishes into a deep oven tray and half fill the tray with hot water and cover with foil.
  5. Place into an oven pre-set to 110-120° c cook until set, approximately 35–45 minutes.
  6. Remove the moulds from the oven and water bath and rest outside of the fridge for 15-20 mins
  7. Cover and place the cooled crème brulee’s into the fridge to set (if refridgerated while hot they will crack.) 
  8. Dredge each custard with sugar or praline and caramelize to a deep golden brown with a flame gun or brulee iron.
post #58 of 68

Blanc-Mange is one of the first forms of dessert basis I learned to make. A very, very long time ago. and after that pastry cream.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #59 of 68

hi,

the reason why your creme brulee didnt work because, should cook in a normal rameskin, you should get a tray and fill it with water half way with your rameskin in it. cook in a 130C oven for a about 20min (probably or 15min) or wait till the top is firm but can still wobble around......it shoudn't any cracks, bubbles and it won't especially be runny.

 

i hope this helps.

Ezra25

post #60 of 68

cooking time will very on the amount of water in the water bath.  The bubbles on top is normal.  You can take a torch and break the bubbles before you place it in the oven.

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