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Why does certain red meat once cooked have a liver taste as an end result and how can we get rid...

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I have cooked beef stew, porkchops, flank steaks, & sirlion and it all end up tasting liver....YUK!  Why is that and How do I get rid of it?  I've slowed cook it and I had prepped it on high, low, medium flame and no such luck. I've used vinegar, wine (white & red), tons of onions, even garlic.  Nada!   Now, when put no efforts in caring for the liver taste its when it becomes perfect to the taste.  This is far and few occassion since I resigned from making red meat dishes.  I leave that job to some other family member to do. 

 

I love to master this and I come to you with ALL EARS. 

 

Thank you for your help.

 

 

post #2 of 13

How odd.  Cooking on high vs. low heat really depends on the cut of meat itself.  For example, meat for stew would need to be seared on high heat and then once all the wet ingredients are added would need to cook for a long time on low heat.  Pork chops would need a relatively high heat.  It's hard to help you though without knowing what recipes and techniques you are using so if you could provide that we'd be able to help you.

 

I find meat that has very low fat content (like beef tenderloin) to have a bit of liver taste and prefer meats with higher fat content.

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 13

A liver taste often results from meat which is less than fresh, or was improperly aged. 

  • Where do you buy your meat? 
  • How do you handle it when it's still raw? 
  • How long do you keep it? 
  • How well do your refrigerator and freezer work? 
  • What are their respective temperature settings?

 

BDL

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post #4 of 13

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

A liver taste often results from meat which is less than fresh, or was improperly aged. 

 

Aren't there also some cuts that are closer to the liver and that taste more like liver than others? I believe I read this once on this very forum - not sure. I have also noticed some cuts tasting like liver a few times, and it was on steaks bought from a reputable source and cooked right away. I have never had that problem with rib-eye, but I've noticed it with other cuts (can't remember which unfortunately). 

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

I buy my meats at a local supermarket, either pathmark, shop n stop, and Costco.  Usually, when I buy red meat I store it right away in the Freezer. I separate the meats and store it in ziplock bags.   When ready to use I thaw it for a day at the bottom level.  Then prep for seasoning(salt, peppers, sofrito, onion and garlic powder). 
 

I do not leave the meat lingering around on the counter table before setting to cook.  I usually have it high flame to create that seared texture and lower it down to cook for a long while. 

 

It still has that liver taste.  Yuk!

 

It's interesting that you say, liver taste may be because of the meat not being fresh.  Unless the food stores are falsiying the information on the ticket I try to get the one that is furthest away from the expired date.  

post #6 of 13

Aside from the nuance of the freezing, storing, etc...you just might be incredibly sensitive to some of the aspects of the meat itself.  Perhaps iron?  Since the meats you list are not exclusively beef, I am going to say that you should look into that.  Does this happen when you have a meat dish out or at a friends?  The only other thing I would wonder is how long do you freeze your meats for typically prior to consumption?  Given that you rarely eat meat, I would suggest seeking out the best possible in your locale.

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

I usually try to eat the meat the week I buy it.  I never have that liver taste problem when I eat red meat at a friends or resturant for that matter.  It just when I prep it.  Even my mothers red meat is better tasting than mine and I try to replica her technique but she puts the same thing as I do.  So Im at a lost.  Arghhh!

post #8 of 13

What kind of pan are you using?

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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Aluminum and also the iron cast.  Mostly, on the first. 

post #10 of 13

Try a non aluminum pan.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 13

Some cuts of meat usually muscle generally are stronger in taste and flavor. Also diet of the animal, if a cow eats corn all day which is not natural to it the beef will taste stronger, Maybe try organic beef.  Meat that has sat in blood for any length of time is basiclaly marinating in blood, and will be stronger in flavor. Age of cow also makes a difference older is stronger.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 13

Do you happen to take medication for cholesterol?  My husband does and has the same complaint.  It does not matter what cut of beef I choose, he says it tastes like liver.  The only exception is my marinated T-bones that I grill over charcoal.

post #13 of 13

In 2008, R. Wadhwani submitted his graduate thesis at the University of Utah on the the very subject of liver off-flavor in beef steak (Google: "Cause and prevention of liver off flavor" for the pdf).  Around page 22 of his thesis he presents his hypothesis that the liver off-flavor is a result of inefficient blood drainage from the beef carcass. Given that beef liver itself is saturated with hemoglobin/myoglobin giving it its very distinctive taste, and the fact that the liver (and other organ meat) is removed immediately upon slaughter thus sustaining the blood content, I see no fault with his hypothesis. My understanding is that the off-flavor is further heightened by prolonged storage, such as freezing; where the meat is practically marinating in its own blood.

 

Knowing what we do now of the practices in the big commercial beef producers/slaughterhouses, it's not surprising that the time needed to properly raise and process a cow is not a priority for them. To avoid this unpleasant taste in what you hope to be a nice steak dinner I suggest you do not purchase your beef from any of the mega grocery chains. I only occasionally indulge in a steak dinner -- because when I do it is fresh, USDA prime, local, grass-fed, and raised free of added hormones and antibiotics -- and yes, it costs more.
 

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