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Starters in kitchen

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Hi guys,

I have switch my job from being a accounting assist to patisserie.

So since I do not have any experience, I have tried working in a bakery as a prep but was kicked out after 2-3 weeks?

I have asked what am i lacking in or what did i do.
They told me I am not observing enough.
'Observing', I have asked what they really means by that, boss say "i have to look deeper instead of asking too much. Copy and do that's all."
I know i am a slow thinker but atleast i take down notes! I mean I have work hard, learn from the people inside without a chief since he mostly out of the kitchen besides 2-1hr. And strange thing is each and everyone have their own way of creating the same bun or mixture. I have asked questions , they seems to ignore or just giving me different answers.

If I remember correctly why i was kicked out, due to cause ask the chief when the donut is not enough, he seems annoyed and answer it's still not being done.

I wish to know how exactly it is, to work with everyone in the kitchen. I would not like to make a 2nd mistake.

Thanks
Edited by BlackKirin - 5/4/12 at 5:09am
post #2 of 4

It may help you to take some classes - they can be amateur level classes at a local culinary school or the culinary program at a community college.  I am not suggesting you go into debt taking a culinary program that graduates you in 6 or 8 or 10 months; but take some classes on specific things (e.g., pastry, cake, bread, entremet).   The lesson will help you to learn why something is done the way it is in the environment of a classroom and not a production kitchen, and to be able to ask questions in a learning environment.

 

When someone is starting out in a kitchen with no prior experience, it means that the manager or senior staff need to take this person under their wing and explain everything; and in many cases, this isn't possible.  I have seen firsthand that managers hire novices and they don't do enough to train them because they need a pair of hands in the kitchen and throw you in the deep end of the water, so to speak.  You don't know enough to swim and you ask questions and no one answers them but you're expected to absorb the way things are being done and do them identically.  Sometimes it's just the way things are and it is in no way a reflection on you.  But there are things you can do to help yourself.  Learn to observe, and know that even the smallest detail can mean the difference between success and failure.   For example, today I had someone dipping cheesecake pops in melted chocolate.  They did a messy job because they weren't paying attention - they dipped too deep and got chocolate above the ball and on the stick, which looks sloppy to a customer.  They didn't shake off enough excess and that caused a foot to form when they were placed down.  They didn't think they were doing anything incorrectly but it's those little things that matter to the finished product. 
 

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 

I see, thank you so much JCakes!  smile.gif this helps alot.

post #4 of 4

I believe they may be telling you either you are careless or  not paying attention to detail. This could be because you are really not interested or find  job boring. In particular in pastry and baking you must follow recipe and get details correctly.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
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