or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Salt and Pepper

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hi all, first post and I have a very basic question. I'm hoping someone can help me settle a friendly dispute.
Many years ago I was taught that a good Salt to White Pepper ratio for basic seasoning (on a saute station for instance) is 7:1. Does this ring a bell with anyone?
By the way, though most likely grammatically incorrect, I do like to capitalize food. I have no idea why.
post #2 of 12

On already ground  white pepper I tend to agree. But since I only use fresh ground and sea salt its different.The fresh grond black pepper is stronger as is the intensity of the sea salt since it is a finer grain it adheres more to the product.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #3 of 12

7:1 is really salty.  4:1 is salty but acceptable.  I always used 2:1.

 

Then again you can be very light with a 10:1 ratio and your food won't taste much of anything at all.

post #4 of 12

I always use 1 oz of pepper for every pound of salt. 

post #5 of 12

Huh, never knew there was a recipe for this.

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by thetincook View Post

Huh, never knew there was a recipe for this.

 

It's all by preference. The most common ratio is 3:1 salt/pepper. And if you're putting vegetables in water then use 1 cup of salt for every gallon of water. 

post #7 of 12

Personally i will season by taste with everything i would not use any ratio, I cant stand white pepper i would almost rather leave it out or have the specks of black or green pepper in it visibal than tasting the white pepper which in my mind is horribly abused and i have gotten really burned on. For salting water " salty as the sea" to apply to green veg. sorry to steal but i believe its directly from the french laundry book or from one of thomas's speeches. just my 2 cents 

post #8 of 12
Quote:
For salting water " salty as the sea" to apply to green veg. sorry to steal but i believe its directly from the french laundry book or from one of thomas's speeches. just my 2 cents

 

Keller may have said that but it wasn't "his" he's just repeating a very common guideline that's probably been taught for hundreds of years.  Every chef I ever worked for used to give the same advice.  As to the salt to pepper ratio, we never really measured; just mixed until it looked "right."  But if I had to guess, it was probably in the range of 5-7:1.  This was using kosher salt and freshly, finely ground black pepper.  Most places I worked at, even the really high end places rarely used white pepper, even when it came to things like potato purees and such.  And personally, I've never been a fan of white pepper either.

http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #9 of 12

Buy whole white pepper, grind it in a coffee grinder, kind of a different animal than white pepper already ground, which always smelled like the barnyard to me, the other thing about already ground white pepper, start using it and someone always sneezes

I also have never heard of a recipe for salt and pepper

post #10 of 12

2 to 1 for me is to much salt to pepper ratio.  I only use white pepper in dishes that are light in color . Black pepper to me is much more pungent.  I use kosher salt for roasting ,sea salt for sauces and table salt for salads

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 12

I've always done 3-1 kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper. But at my new job its closer to 7-1 with with a small amount of dried oregano, garlic and onion powder. Not sure how I feel about it but that's what they do... 

post #12 of 12
The ratio by volume depends on when the pepper was ground and how finely; and the relative fineness of the salt. Stale, pulverized pepper and very coarse sea salt will require a different ratio than very fine salt and fresh, coarsely cracked, white pepper. If you can't season at an appropriate balance in layers, than perfect it by adjustment you should consider a different career.

Also, in my opinion anyway, the appropriate salt/pepper balance is fairly constant among good chefs. It's fair to say that it's more a matter of tasting than of taste.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs