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deacidification of bargan basement box wine

post #1 of 2
Thread Starter 

hello all,

 

i have no doubt many of you will look upon me with unrestrained scorn, but i am looking for a way to make awful boxed wine better.  "why not buy good wine?" you might ask: because i damn well can't afford it. society has cast me unto the gutter, and i only seek to make my lowly existence more tolerable.

 

right now i have 2 tricks.  trick the first, a bit of grape juice concentrate.  this sweetens and does not conflict with the already more or less grapeness of my swill. it is considerably better that way. still, bargain box wine is rather low pH. there-in, sometimes i use a bit of coffee cream. 

 

unmixed, this results in cheese. mixed, the precipitate becomes quite fine and is less noticeable. i feel i am nearly there. but, i also feel there would be something better.

 

My Question Is: can anyone recommend a strong, perhaps more concentrated base to react with my terribly acidic wine.  obviously, i am pretty open to solutions.  i have not yet tried baking soda, though, actually, i guess i could right now. (!!!!!) (Gah!) okay then. i do not recommend baking soda. it does indeed deacidify, by the resulting salts (salts right? acid and a base?) are pretty flavorful.

 

so yeah.  what else is basic, and is also food? some kind of root vegetable? i live in a big city and have ready access to a wide range of those. i read about people fixing wine with mustard, are mustard plants (rather than the sauce we call mustard) basic? hmm. maybe dandelions...  those idiots at whole foods price em like they were saffron, but i'd be willing to over pay once for the sake of science.

 

anyway, that is my conundrum. any suggestions will be seriously considered. thank you for thinking outside the box (of wine).

 

-yet another wasted wizard

post #2 of 2

Try doing wine spritzers if you prefer whites.   3/4 glass wine, a couple of splashes lemon juice or a couple of lemon wedges and either gingerale, seven up, sprite or whatever sparkling water you like.   You can also make red wine spritzers.

 

If you prefer try to add fruits along the lines of raisins, prunes, dried peaches, dried apricots, dried figs - if you want to go adventurous fresh ginger, aloe vera (sap), banana, most melons, fennel, and micro greens.

 

There are a lot of different ways - maybe let us know the flavor profile you are looking for and do you prefer whites or reds?

 

(edit - late addition if you like sweet, try using stevia it is a sweetener that is alkaline no real taste)

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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