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Wedding Croquembouche?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Let me start by saying I'm not a pastry chef... not even remotely close one.  However, I'm seeking the opinions of anyone with experience.  

 

I'm getting married in a few months, and we do not want a traditional wedding cake and grooms cake.  At every wedding, the bride gets a MASSIVE wedding cake and the groom gets something fun, both of which usually covered in fondant and then most of it gets thrown in the trash.  We don't want that.  We want something elegant, yet simple.  One or two cake balls per person.  A nice croquembouche.  

 

I've never been to a wedding with one, and I thought it would be a cool, unique idea.  

 

Is it realistic though?  Will we still have a ton of wasted cake?  is 200 cake balls enough to make a decent sized one?  I only say 200 because that's the estimated number of guests right now... 

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 12

A big congratulations MRM  !  

 

Before I say anything about the cake itself (croquembouche) there are some things I just wanted to run by you.

 

1) As caramel absorbs water from the air, the effect of the spun sugar will be different on each croquembouche. (humidity is a factor)

2) A 400 piece croquembouche would be roughly the same height of a 4 tier cake. You said 200 pieces for 200 guests, you will need 400 + pieces (at least)

3) The cake should be assembled the same day of your wedding

4)  It relies on the correct balance of caramel to hold it together yet also to be pulled apart.

5) Must be kept away from humidity or steam.

6) the choux puffs can be made a couple of days ahead of time (in airtight containers) but everything else should be made the same day

 

Just some things to concider before making it. 

 

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 12

Sounds to me that you do not want Pate Chioux (cream puff) but instead you want  a Croquembouche made of cake balls ?   right ?

 

But you still want it to have all the spun sugar on it on the cake balls ?  The sugar will melt.  It might sound very elegant and unique,  but it is not practical.  But it is your wedding.  I hope it works out for you..  How about make a French Macaron Tower ?  that is also very elegant.

post #4 of 12

Good idea but highly impractical.  Your looking for trouble what with Humidity, prior storage moving and handeling.  Even if it's damp and is raining outside your finished and will wind up with a sticky puddle of sugar

    .Try individual wedding cakes size of cupcakes all stacked on a platform that forms 1 large cake.

Congratulations

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #5 of 12

 You can decorate this with any color, flavor, fresh flowers,  ribbons, bows made of tulle ....the ideas are endless. Put any cake topper on it , sugar piece or flowers. Less stress for you, you have your own spin on the croquembouche , and easy to make.

 

 

http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/304977/wedding-cakes-theme/@center/272453/wedding-cakes#/304567

 

wedding cake.jpg

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

 You can decorate this with any color, flavor, fresh flowers,  ribbons, bows made of tulle ....the ideas are endless. Put any cake topper on it , sugar piece or flowers. Less stress for you, you have your own spin on the croquembouche , and easy to make.

 

 

http://www.marthastewartweddings.com/304977/wedding-cakes-theme/@center/272453/wedding-cakes#/304567

 

wedding cake.jpg

 

 

Wow that's wicked. I've never seen one but love the idea. I wonder if any one has done smaller versions and just served one to each table.

 

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yea I guess.. I'm not entirely sure Im educated enough to even know what makes a croquembouche a croquembouce... I thought it was simple cake balls stacked in a cone shape or something similar.  Does it require spun sugar and caramel to technically make it a croquembouche? 

 

If thats the case then no, I dont want a true croquembouche, but maybe something easier, yet still elegant.  Cake balls stacked up in the same manner as a croquembouche sounds good to me. 
 

post #8 of 12

I suppose you could use tempered chocolate or coating chocolate as the glue.

 

Are cakeballs strong enough to hold together? Mini cream puffs are traditional. TBH, I'd prefer the cream puffs.

post #9 of 12

A croq was originally a Christmas  centerpiece . It is mini cream puffs(Pate e choux) adhered  and stacked together with caramel or boiled sugar glaze.

At one time in Europe it represented a xmas tree and was decorated like one, only all decos were edible sugar and royal icing. Very festive

 

Petals  the one you show is very nice.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by thetincook View Post

I suppose you could use tempered chocolate or coating chocolate as the glue.

 

Are cakeballs strong enough to hold together? Mini cream puffs are traditional. TBH, I'd prefer the cream puffs.

 

Alot of people make it with chocolate, and yes , as you said it serves as a glue. The cakeballs will hold- there is not a problem with that. But I agree with Dave, if MRM is going to have 200+ guests , I am figuring 10 people per table , making the mini ones ,elegantly decroated and brought to each table would be very charming.

 

I agree about the traditional cream puffs, it is stunning cake if its done right.

 

@ MMr : If you have never made one and you really want this cake, then I suggest you do a trial one. Take the biggest china cap you have in your kitchen, spray it with pam, turn it upside down , and start gently arranging the cream puffs one by one adding the syrup as your glue as you go. Try to do this in at least 5 seconds as you want the sugar to always be at the same temp. Once you have reached the top, take a whisk and dip it into the sugar and quickly drizzle the sugar starting at the bottom and working your way up to the top so the the interior is "glued" . Let the croquembouche stand until the sugar has hardened. 

When ready , turn upside down, gently tap the cone and your croquembouche should slide out.  Re-heat your sugar again and thinly drizzle in long strokes from top to bottom then around....your are trying to encase the the croque with very thin lines of sugar.

 

This is your wedding day. Don't have regret about the things you wanted to  have. If this is something you would like to try, then why not ? An experimant will give you results, based on that , then you can make a decision on whether or not not to make it like this or not.

 

We all support you.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 

Im not going to be making these my self.  Im hiring a friend who is a pastry chef and she has experience with these kinds of things.  I was just mainly curious if it's reasonable, or practical
 

post #12 of 12

MRM,

 

You wrote in your original post :

 

"Is it realistic though?  Will we still have a ton of wasted cake?  is 200 cake balls enough to make a decent sized one?  I only say 200 because that's the estimated number of guests right now..."

 

That being said I would strongly suggest that you sit down with the pastry chef and go over these thoughts with her as well. She may have some wonderful suggests that have not been mentioned yet.

More and more weddings today are not having a wedding cake. There are many receptions that have a  beautiful sweet table. Those that feel like having something sweet have a choice of a few things. Like I said before , the pastry chef would know all this.

 

Whatever you decide, I just know it will be great.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
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