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Austrian Pumpkin seed oil?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

kürbiskernöl

I received a gift from an Austrian woman that i hardly know, a bag with a few local products (she's from Graz), among which black pumpkin seeds, some speck or other sort of smoked dry cured ham, and a bottle of kürbiskernöl, or pumpkinseed oil. 

It's very dark, blackish, and is not very viscous, it's fast flowing in the bottle (haven't opened it yet) so that i thought it was some sort of juice rather than oil. 

Does anyone know what it's used for?  do you use it for salad or vegetables like olive oil?  do you sautee in it?
Thanks


Edited by siduri - 5/16/12 at 12:15am
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #2 of 7

All I know about pumpkinseed oil is that it is usually used for Salads in Europe and it is also said to be helpful with ,or to prevent  postate problems.

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply
post #3 of 7

Use it as a finishing oil, not for cooking or heating anything. We use it in the winter to garnish roasted squash soup. It has an intense flavor that we usually cut with another mild oil such as pure olive oil.

 

I like it to compliment any squash dish in the winter, but we've been known to use it in other uses to add complexity. I like it as part of the oil in a vinaigrette. It is really dark green, when applied you will see that it isn't black.
 

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks, guys, that's helpful.   Pumpkin season is a ways off, but i'll open it and see what sort of thing it might taste good with. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 7

I purchased a bottle of pumpkin seed oil produced in New York by Stony Brook.  I find it is great as a basting oil for grilled fish and chicken - and believe it or not - on vanilla ice cream. Their facebook page and website has a bunch of ideas: www.wholeheartedfoods.com.
 

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Just to give some feedback, I made zucchine last night.  Zucchine have very little taste of their own, and unless they're tiny baby finger-length ones where you boil them briefly and serve with olive oil, salt and pepper and are wonderful, the bigger ones are pretty tasteless.  I don't mind them but my husband (who will eat anything practically) always complains when i make zucchine.  But of all the green vegetables, they take the least effort to clean and prepare.

 

So i figured, being of the squash family, the pumpkin seed oil might be an enhancement for their mild flavor.  I mixed a couple of crushed garlic cloves, some parsley and a small amount of fresh marjoram (too strong an herb and they'd taste only of "pizza flavoring") and a little olive oil and the pumpkin seed oil with breadcrumbs, salt and pepper. 

 

I sliced the zucchine lengthwise and put the crumb mixture on top.  Baked them until they were soft and the crumbs crispy. 

 

It was a success.  He even scraped up all the crumbs that had fallen on the pan. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 7

The person who was gifted the pumpkin seed oil is blessed (I wish it was me again).

We use the oil on salads.  You can also drizzle them over pasta salads with meat etc.  Just don't cook it.

It's delicious straight out of the bottle.  As far as I know this oil it is thick.

I'm Austrian and hope to find a locally grown (NE) equivalent or a store that sells organic pso.

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