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Gluten FREE Pizza

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I could really use some help… I’m getting killed with Gluten free requests in my restaurant. One of our signature items is our pizza.  A friend suggested that I try a frozen product.  Quality and fresh products mean a great deal to us! Does anyone have any suggestions for a COST EFFECTIVE & QUAILTY way of producing a Gluten free product?

post #2 of 19

Have you tried the C4C line of gluten free flours? Thomas Keller along with some other very talented people spent a while developing this blended product that directly replaces flour in most applications.

 

We are currently extruding a gluten free spaghetti in my kitchen that is better than what i've tasted on the market in the form of dried pastas.
 

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Dude this is my first venture with ANY gluten free anything! One of the advantages of working for corporations for many years is that these kind of things we taken care of for me! Now Im on my own! Gluten free flour... I am compleatly uneducated! Does it act like regular flour, like for making pizza dough?

post #4 of 19

Google cup4cup and you will find all the information you need. They way I have been using it, it is a direct replacement for regular flour.
 

post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 

Awesome~ Thanks Brother!

post #6 of 19

I have heard stories by many about cauliflower pizza crust.  I'll try to find the recipe that appealed to me, but you can google and there are many.  I think the idea is to blanch the cauliflower and then shred it so that it becomes like flour.  The key to gluten free is experimenting with the ingredients we are no so familiar with, like chickpea flour and almond flour.  It's like a subculture of food that needs exploring.

 

Going gluten-free can be successfully done, I have a few friends that are gluten intolerant and they have very balanced nutrition.  I will admit that at times I am very jealous that they can live happily (and skinny!) without carbs, gluten is my achilles heel.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #7 of 19

please be careful with cross contamination. gluten free flour does not work the same as regular flour in a yeast risen dough. it does not hold shape, it is more batter like. pm me with any questions, been daignosed with celiac for over 6 years, I'd be happy to help.

kathee

post #8 of 19

What does cross contamination have to do with it?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 19

cross contamination with utensils that may have touched other gluten items. need to have seperate containers of sauce so that the gluten molecules don't get transferred as some people have violent reactions to even the slightest amount. have to be careful with regular flour even in the air.

post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 

WOW! Thanks for all of the insight! Freaking Mellow Mushroom uses a premade frozen gluten free product only available in one size... I really don't want to do that! We make everything from scratch and I would prefer to keep it that way! Ill keep up the research... thanks for all the great comments! You all have me going in the right direction.

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by katbalou View Post

cross contamination with utensils that may have touched other gluten items. need to have seperate containers of sauce so that the gluten molecules don't get transferred as some people have violent reactions to even the slightest amount. have to be careful with regular flour even in the air.

 

Ah thanks for clearing that up, had no idea. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 19

Try Quinoa flour as well.  Not the same as wheat flour but if you are in a pinch and HAVE to have a gluten free pizza that is an alternative.  Here is a recipe I tested in the lab for a customer who was doing a Quinoa chip and flavored Quinoa pizza dough I worked on.

 

-50 grams fresh yeast

-2 cups quinoa flour

-1-2 tsp salt

-1 and 1/4 cups of water

-3 tbls olive oil

-3 tbls psyllium husk powder

 

warm water and add yeast and salt to dissolve and activate. 

Add psyllium husk and let that mixture sit for 10 minutes. 
Slowly add the water to the flour and knead into a ball for 2-3 minutes

Add olive oil and mix until incoporated but not more

 

Set in a warm place covered with a damp towel to rise until about doubled in size

 

Roll out with to desired size and shape using course ground quinoa instead of corn flour and treat as a regular pizza to top and bake.

 

 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #13 of 19

ChefHow,

 

My best friend is looking for a good recipe and this looks like something I  would like to make for her, thank you for sharing it.

 

-3 tbls psyllium husk powder  - where could I purchase this ?  Would I find it Health food store  or a pharmacy ?

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(157 photos)
  
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(157 photos)
  
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post #14 of 19

you might want to check if Udi's or kinnickinick(sp?) makes a premade commercial crust. it'd be way easier than making your own. and safer in celiac terms. or King arthur makes a good mix , too.

post #15 of 19

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #16 of 19

Petals, its a dietary fiber supplement and should be available in any health food store you may have in your area.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

I really appreciate ALL of those suggestions! Working on it this week! let cha all know how it works out!

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koukouvagia View Post

What does cross contamination have to do with it?

 

We do a a gluten-free pizza crust that's made for us off-site by a local company - but that's the benefit of living in a gluten-free heaven like Boulder!  It's a brown rice flour and tapioca flour base.  We don't make it in-house due to cross contamination issues, for instance the hobart is used to make our regular dough, we'd have to get separate dough trays, etc. 

 

When baking you're going to have to keep it off your oven floor as well, not to mention off your peels, since they're all cross-contaminated by gluten.  We use high-temp baking paper sheets.  The dough is just barely parbaked and stacked on individual baking sheets inside pizza boxes to be stored.  The sheets are large enough to cover the peel so that we can build like normal without the dough ever contacting the peel, cutting board, etc, and then it all gets slid into the oven still on the baking sheets as a barrier between the dough and the oven floor. 

post #19 of 19

This cross contamination business is very serious, thanks for sharing.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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