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What are some classic or traditional dishes that every cook should know how to make? - Page 2

post #31 of 50

lol.gif

 

avec une bière..........& 6/49.


Edited by petalsandcoco - 5/23/12 at 5:35pm

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #32 of 50

James Beard's American Cookery might be worth a look for you. It's not "up to the minute" since Beard wrote it in 1972 and died in 1985, but it might give you some good historical background on American foodways.

post #33 of 50

Pizza

Fish, skin on

steak, med rare

post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

  y'a du monde au balcon

 

eek.gif You do know what this sentence actually means, right? lol.gif

post #35 of 50

Do you ask your possible future employees how to spell?  

post #36 of 50

What about spelling?

post #37 of 50

Becoming a Chef by Dornenburg and Page.  Read that first.  Don't worry about cooking certain dishesm, those you can learn anytime.  Work on a line. Work like a dog. Work as many hours as you can possibly handle and then work more. Become one with any knife.  Cook with the seasons, know what is local, keep it clean and fresh.  Mostly just work as many hours as you can.  You will learn if you really want to.  When you get to menu writing, start with the Flavor Bible for a reference.

post #38 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

eek.gif You do know what this sentence actually means, right? lol.gif

 

 

It means the balcony is full.biggrin.gif

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #39 of 50

A lot of french slang is just weird.  Apparently "Va te fais cuire un oeuf" (go cook yourself an egg) isn't something to trifle with. :P

post #40 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBandu View Post

A lot of french slang is just weird.  Apparently "Va te fais cuire un oeuf" (go cook yourself an egg) isn't something to trifle with. :P

 

Hey at least it's slightly more elegant than its English counterpart.  lol.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

It means the balcony is full.biggrin.gif

 

Well.... let's just say it's related to a woman's bosom. wink.gif

post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Well.... let's just say it's related to a woman's bosom. wink.gif

 

Ahhh the vernacular....So what you saying is that the balcony is REALLY full. lol.gif

I was thinking more of chicken bosom in a bucket.

Hey you guys know how to get to my place right?

I-75 Exit #69 to Big Beaver road. eek.gif

I swear I'm not making that up.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

 Exit #69 to Big Beaver road. eek.gif

 

Only a chef could have such an address. biggrin.gif Went there and found an empty balcony though? 

 

320px-Conjunt_de_Tres_Edificis_-_004.jpg

post #43 of 50

HAHAHAHA Is that on bodacious Blvd?

OK back to the topic at hand, I have a question for Petals. Several years ago we did a trip around the Gaspe on a fishing trip and wound up at a lodge up with the fine folks from the Federation du Saumon Atlantique and ESPN's Reel guys. IIR the guides spoke a lot about a dish where they would can the venison of deer or Moose along with ruffed grouse (yum) for storage and then make a pie with the meat in the winter months. Any ideas what that may have been?

 

Dave


Edited by DuckFat - 5/25/12 at 2:27am
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #44 of 50

I'll give it a stab . Are you thinking of "Cipaille" ?

 

Petals.

 

My boss used to hunt grouse, woodcock, pheasant quail, he was a real hunter. 

 

ps. here is an interesting read.

 

http://www.ameriquefrancaise.org/en/article-454/Lac-Saint-Jean_%C2%ABTourti%C3%A8re%C2%BB.html

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #45 of 50

Yes that's it! :) Thanks for the link. The Gaspe was very pretty and so much like Northern Mi only with the ocean instead of the Great Lakes.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #46 of 50

The fish pies and tourtieres are one thing but as you know there is so much more to the wonder of Gaspe.

Besides the fish you’ve probably seen the fields of strawberries or had their famous camembert style goat cheese.

The golf of St. Lawrence is also known for its production of sauerkraut which I don’t think many know about that.

The wapiti farms are there as well.

Have you ever heard of the Gaspesie Gourmande’s ? They  promote local products on their menu’s.

They have a chef down there by the name of Yvon Belzile (won awards), he works at the Fleur de Lys in Cap Chat. He is well known for his “ persille “ of lobster, pink shrimps and sweetbreads.

Rucher des Framboisier near the village of Maria produce large amounts of honey and wine.

Paspebiac used to be the cod fishing heaven.....

Maison de Pecheur serves some of the best French food, lobster with their famous cheese sauce.

Restuarant Etoile du Nord for the fisherman plate: cod, cod tongues, halibut, sole , shrimp and scallops.

Gite du Mont Albert rt. 299 inland from Ste Anne des Monts, there is an Inn there with a great culinary reputation. : smoked salmon, game consommé, pheasant confit, rack of caribou with garlic cloudberry jelly....

My friend who passed away not that long ago had some homes down there, Cyril Devouge, he was the best fiddler in Gaspe. If anyone should ever ask about “Cy” Devouge and his fiddling and his wife Edna’s fish cakes, they will tell you all about it.

But there is nothing more serene than:

  walking down to the ocean in the early morning, the cool breeze against your skin, the salt air, watching the sun come up , the sea gulls flying high and the soft splash of the waves rolling in. 

 

Petals

 

ps. French  food in Gaspe is unique and wonderful. The fishing is not bad either wink.gif

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #47 of 50

Ahhh I remember stopping in Cap chat for seafood. I think the restaurant was part of a small hotel and highly rated at the time. It was small and unlike American kitchens spotless.

I remember mussels being quite popular and fiddle heads as well as other local ingredients.

The Gaspe is a dry fly fishermans dream. I could count the places I would place as it's equal in the entire world on one hand.

So others can know the beauty of the places we are speaking about here is a link to the National park with a slide show.

When I was a kid I used to dream of hunting Anticosti Isle.

Some day I will make it to Labrador for Brook trout.

I had no idea about the sauerkraut.
 

 

Dave

 

 

http://www.sepaq.com/pq/bon/index.dot?language_id=1#

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #48 of 50

Petals your discriptive writing is very good you should attempt to write a book.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #49 of 50

Thank you ChefEd, those were kind words, a nice way to end my shift, its 11:12 , you made my day.

 

@ Dave : can't beat a rainbow , a salmon or artic char for that matter. There is a place I go to in St.George the Beauce, a camp in the middle of nowhere, you get up early in the morning before the fish even know your coming and you slowely make your way down the rocks, careful not to trip into the shallow water and as the water ripples down , you spot the fresh water brook trout, not big, 5-8 inches long, just big enough to flip into a cast iron pan with butter and lemon. The dew is still wet on the grass....the campfire is slowely burning.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #50 of 50

Mmmm.  Great memories of the Gaspe and the Maritimes.  When we moved to Minneapolis, my wife and I took a month off and drove from Minnesota to Montreal, to Maine and up the coast through the Maritimes.  Came back through the Gaspe to Quebec City and Montreal on the way home.  The best lobster bisque I've ever had was at a gas station restaurant at Cape Tormentine, waiting for the ferry to PEI.  That and fresh local sea scallops and linguini cooked at our camp site at the Bay of Fundy (with the 47 foot tides).  My wife was born and grew up in Montreal, although her parents were Americans.  So I have been fortunate to have ample opportunity to visit Montreal and Quebec City (we are long overdue for another visit as we now usually go out to BC where her sister lives in the interior).  Yup, the food in Quebec and the Maritimes is different than the states.  Generally a step (or two or three) above what you can commonly get here.  On the other hand, of course, there is Poutine.  We do make butter tarts, crepes, flan, moules marinaire and tourtiere with some frequency at home.  A number of dishes (or variations) on Petals' list are also in regular rotation at home, along with the Asian dishes that I grew up with.

 

A lot of Petals' list looks like Bistro food to me.  With that in mind, I'd suggest Patricia Well's Bistro cookbook.  Nice and straight forward take on "classic" Bistro dishes.  Simple ingredients and basic techniques -- but dishes where the quality of the ingredients will be apparent. Less fussy than most of her other French cook books.  I've given away lots of copies to nieces and nephews learning to cook for themselves.  Eminently manageable for anyone who can shop and follow directions.  I'd also add The New Orleans Cookbook by Rima and Richard Collins to American regional cookbook list as New Orleans/Louisiana food seems to me to be the most extensive and cohesive American regional cuisine.  Presupposes that everyone should know how to make a roux and make a gumbo. Ultimately,  I suppose what constitutes a  "classic" dish depends on what culture you are from and the cuisines to which you have been exposed.  Insert extensive discourse on Hawaiian Plate Lunch here (cue Kaneohegirl).
 

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