or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Potato...allergy?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I was going to add this to the "Onion substitute" thread but I figured it was a little off topic.  I had a woman come in one day claiming to be allergic to potatoes.  That got me thinking, if you've got a potato allergy, would you have an anaphylactic reaction to potato flour as well?  Anyone have any insight?

post #2 of 18

It's very strange what allergies people can have.  I would tend to be dismissive of many of the claims people make because there are plenty of quacks diagnosing allergies with unscientific means, and people are very approximate in using the word "allergy" when they actually mean something else.  But i guess people can be seriously allergic to anything. 

 

I knew a woman many years ago (in the 50s, when people knew much less about allergies) who was allergic to cotton.  It was a huge problem.  Not only for clothing and all that, but also for food since most unspecified oils and margarines contained cotton seed oil.  She'd get a severe anaphylactic reaction to any food that contained it.  And in those days restaurants and pastry shops were not careful about allergies as they've been forced to be now, and she'd ask "is that made with butter or margarine", and of course they;d always say butter.  After a few trips to the hospital she just had to decline all pastries made outside her own home, and pretty much anything else at a restaurant.  Most of the people just assumed she'd sneeze a little.   

 

Anyway, if she's allergic to potatoes, she'd be allergic to potato flour as well.  Could even be allergic to the plant itself. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #3 of 18

Not all foods all the time.  Sometime if the food is processed  the agent that causes the allergy is destroyed.

    Example  years ago I was involved with experiments using ACCENT t(Monosodium Glutamate) many people were allergic or came down with what was called Chinese Syndrome which was discribed as feeling your arm go numb and like having a heart attack. We did testing using placebos.and different types of experiments .

   When given MSG in a cold preperation majority of people were  ok, but when subject to tremendous heat from Woks many people had reactions. This is the reverse of some foods., but interesting

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #4 of 18

What is interesting about this is Potatoes were the food used to flush many allergens from your system as part of a diet after you were diagnosed.  What they are finding is a few of the protiens found in potatoes can cause allergic reactions, but its almost exclusively when raw or under cooked.  Once the protiens have been fully cooked they are dormant and not toxic in most cases, scientists are working on ways to remove the allergens from the potatoes once they are dehydrated and cooked so they can be used as a starch and a filler/binder in foods since it is WF compliant and one of the few things that WF regularly recomends and never asks to have labeled as its intended use.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #5 of 18

Thats like the green in a raw potato contains trace arsenic but when cooked totaly harmless. You often see it on cooked potato chips. Food chemistry is extremely interesting.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Thats like the green in a raw potato contains trace arsenic but when cooked totaly harmless. You often see it on cooked potato chips. Food chemistry is extremely interesting.

 

Apples have cynide, many fruits contain arsenic, chickens are born with salmonella... 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefhow View Post

 

Apples have cynide, many fruits contain arsenic, chickens are born with salmonella... 

 

Tell me more, master Jedi.

post #8 of 18

In almost all processed products you will find 1/10 of 1% Sodium Benzoate  . Better hope it is measured right because it is a poison and to much could kill you. It kills bacteria buildup in some foods.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #9 of 18

chef I havent developed a product to go on the store shelf in 6+ years that contains Sodium Benzoate.  The ONLY time I did was when I was in the sauce biz and we used it in uncooked shelf stable dressings that were low acid.  Today MANY companies are getting away from using that and Potassium Sorbate as preservatives and are using high concentrate citric acid and/or a lantibiotic called Bisin where cook up isnt an option. 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #10 of 18

I do notice that but still see the other 2 quite a bit. Not to familiar with Bisin. what is this derived from? and i it good for anything or limited to certain genre?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 18

Lantibiotics, Bisin being the first used for food, are based on Gram Positive bacteria that are naturally occuring during synthesis.  They are capable of preserving food for LONG periods of time without having to dehydrate.  There are several but right now Bisin is the most readily available.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #12 of 18

Does this good bacteria then kill or slow down the harmful ones? I take it it almost acts like an pre antibiotic that sets up a defense prior . am I correct?  And is this the same bisin found in our digestive systems?? if it iss then I can understand the concept.


Edited by chefedb - 5/24/12 at 4:00am

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #13 of 18

Yes, Yes and Yes. 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #14 of 18

Yes, there are blood tests that can be obtain to diagnose specific protein allergies, and immunologist can order these tests. I am a doctor and my daughter is allergic to white potato, she presents urticaria and angioedema ( hives and swelling ) blood tests showed she is allergic to potatin, a protein found in potato. Since being aware of this , the only time she had a reaction was when she ate a piece of bread that had potato flour on it, when we go to chinese and japanese restaurants they tell us which noodles she can eat since some of them also have potato flour.  So far, she can eat sweet potato without a reaction. In her case, even cooking she reacts to it, though I must tell you the worst reaction happened after peeling potatoes at school for a Thanksgiving lunch.

post #15 of 18

There are true allergies and then there are sensitivities.  They are not the same
 

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

Reply

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

Reply
post #16 of 18

My son is a trainee chef- commis and after peeling a very large quantity of potatoes to help the KP the back of his hands developed a rash (could be he wiped his hands on his apron) and we spent last night in A& E as they swelled to twice the size and began weeping .Initially we were told it was contact dermatitis but there was no evidence on his palms. A senior consultant said it was a rapid response to a product or products and we believe it was potatoes. Is it possible to be allergic to starch? starch from the potatoes and possibly starch from the whites- they were laundered by a new company? I have an allergy to aspirin (salicilates) so it is possibly hereditary and he would be affected by something.. He is now on steroids and the swelling is subsiding but he can't go back until his hands recover- he obviously needs to find the source-

Any help gratefully received

post #17 of 18

Allergy sources can be hard to pinpoint.

Was he wearing gloves?

If so that would be my bet.

I have had dermatitis on just a thumb before (ex bartender...citrus and perpetually wet hands) so the lack of palm involvement is not diagnostic IMO.

Have him carry some antihistamine tabs and cream for the next time (if there is one) and an epi pen for any serious reaction such as difficulty breathing.

For an adult to suddenly develop allergies is uncommon but not unheard of.... sometimes anxiety will bring it on.

If it continues (and interferes with his life) maybe desensitization therapy would be in order.

From one mom to another....good luck!

 

mimi

post #18 of 18

Was anything other than water involved in the preparation of the potatoes such as in washing before peeling or soaking after peeling.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking