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Lobster ravioli.....an idea for the sauce

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

so today I am going to make what I hope is a really yummy lobster ravioli. I was thinking about the sauce and thought about combining a tomatoe sauce with some of the new Philly Cooking cream, the tomatoe basil to be exact and hopefully get a kind of tomatoe rose sauce. Firstly has anyone used this before? It might sound sacriligious to real gourmet, but for us working moms it might be a godsend ......and if I don't do this, whats an easy yet impressive alternative?

post #2 of 16

Here is a link to a thread I started about this very topic not too long ago. http://www.cheftalk.com/t/69687/sauce-for-lobster-ravioli

 

Cream cheese is an interesting idea, but I don't use stuff like that.  I find it just as easy to add some regular old philly cream cheese to a tomato sauce and add some basil to it. 

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

thanks. The cooking creme is actually philly creme cheese product they just came out with. Consistency more of a thick sauce so I thought it might be good. I'll check out your thread. thanks

post #4 of 16
It mostly depends on what you've got going inside the ravioli besides just lobster. As a first take, I think I'd choose between a simple and fresh Marinara; Arabiata; Sauce Americaine; Sauce Nantua (although bay shrimp are usually an easier get than crayfish); herbed beurre noisette; beurre blanc; or Sauce Nantais (the fancy name for beurre blanc with cream). I don't think lobster and cheese partner very well, so I'd avoid anything stronger than mascarpone, creme fraiche, sour cream or the like.

Going a little farther afield, a mild curry or (non-chocolate) green or yellow mole could be very nice.

Also, you could boil the ravioli, drain them, and serve as dumplings. That is, dry but accompanied with a dipping sauce -- such as a sweet/hot thai chili. If I were looking to go incorporate some novelty and surprise -- I'd go the dumpling route and probably accompany with a trio of sauces.

BDL
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post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

THanks BDL....I think you cooking skills are far superior to mine..I need to go to a cooking encyclopedia now blushing.gif..i'll check it out. thanks for the ideas

post #6 of 16

If you kept your shells you could make a lovely homardine sauce.

 

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post #7 of 16

whay don't you do it the Italian way? Ravioli are Italian after all!

Just combine 1 teaspoon butter, the juice and zest of 1/4 lemon per person in a saucepan. Heat briefly until the butter is melted. Stir in your cooked ravioli and a little pasta water. Turn teh heat on high and stir lightly so the cooking liquid is absorbed. Serve with a sprinkle of parsley. If ou really need to have cream, just add whipping cream, one or two tablespoon, no more. If you have a too heavy sauce you will not taste the lobster.

 

Letizia

www.madonnadelpiatto.com

post #8 of 16

I did some the other day and served them with a champagne and vanilla bean "beurre blanc".   I add the quotation marks because I add a little cream to my "beurre blanc" to stabilize it therefore making it something else that the name of escapes me at the moment.    Regardless, it was delicious.

post #9 of 16

How about adding a little of the Philly Cooking Cream to the Lobster IN the ravioli and then taking the marinara and adding it to sauteed garlic and onion a bit of reduced cream and some chopped basil. .

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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #10 of 16

Lobster ravioli in brodo di pesce (fish broth). Sauces are not always the best choice for pasta ripiena.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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post #11 of 16

though the dishes are probably washed, dried and put away and the ravioli digested i will add this...my tendency, no my preference actually, for a sauce is a broth, especially something as rich as lobster ravioli. you want to be able to taste the filling, however little lobster they added to the ricotta filling...saffron is lovely in both color and taste and green thai curry would be equally as good, or as ordo suggests, a wonderfully rich fish broth.   broth would elevate, compliment and enhance the lobster in the ravioli, not mask it as in cream..it's also a whole lot easier than making a sauce.....i must say that i think it's great that you are feeding this to your children. as a working mom it can't always be easy and many mother's, either due to time or tiredness opt out for easier meals.....personally, there is nothing easier to make than pasta and the additions of fresh vegetables(even frozen), and proteins are endless...anyway, good on you!

joey

a thought though.....would your children eat/enjoy curry or saffron? don't know how old or adventurous they are.....read kk's thread....she was happy with her decision i remember

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #12 of 16

   I like the two suggestions above...

 

   When I read the initial post, the first thought I had was the lobster ravioli in a shallow bowl of Vietnamese broth.

 

  Dan

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Well I Loved the suggestions...thanks so much!! in the end, I did a filling of lobster, porchini mushrooms, garlic, fried in butter and used the Philly cooking creme...tomatoe basil and added some half and half to it....after cooking the ravioli I added the sauce which turned out to be delish!! I have more lobsters on order so I think I will try some of the suggestions that you all made. Thanks again for a wealth of new ideas....

post #14 of 16

OK. I'm late to the party here. LOL @ ME. I completely agree w/ madonnaDP's suggestion. After reading through though, I like what some others suggested too. My way I think would be brown butter, a little pasta water for creamyness (I thought this was goofy at first, but have found it to work really nice), a little fresh basil (or some other herb of diner's choice), a splash of a dry but fruity white wine and a tiny pinch of saffron (maybe a pinch of Old Bay too).  

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

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post #15 of 16

Here, just as a tangent, this is my absolute go-to wine w/ lobster:

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Alamos is the entry level wine from Catena Zapata and delivers a serious Torrontes for the price. 100% unoaked. Torrontes has a unique expression in Argentina and has often been called the country's signature white varietal. Lively notes of citrus and peach fruit with delicate layers of jazmine blossom and fresh herbs. The wine is light and fresh on the palate with excellent balance and finishing with bright, crisp acidity.

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #16 of 16

The only really good factor on the Phili cream is that it doesn't break.

I have tried all the flavors and to me they all have an ascorbic acid or vinegar taste. Maybe it is a preservative . I prefer to make my own Bechamel or heavy cream,

 

For me  a Light Sauce Nantua  (maybe using rock shrimp)

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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