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Beef tasting Menu

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 

I have a special client whose hubby wants a "beef based" tasting menu for his 40th birthday party in June.

 

I am thinking of a 6-7 course tasting menu, no real single country plan, but more of a global approach, but finishing up with fillet mignon with garlic mash, dessert is hazelnut creme brulee...

 

Any ideas for dishes??

post #2 of 33

If its all beef i would definitly do a carpacio or raw type course, for me some kind of braised short ribs would be a must for me. I would think an all beef tasting would be verying heavy, But thats just me.

post #3 of 33
Thread Starter 

I agree that an all beef meal is very heavy, thus i think the tasting menu approach... I like the carpaccio idea, i also like a ground beef slider to start, a Thai beef salad, a carpaccio dish...not sure what else yet...

post #4 of 33

Steak TARTAR should not Be forgotten -:)

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post #5 of 33

And a 'flank steak '

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post #6 of 33

or a Korean style tableside prepared BBQ

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post #7 of 33

And everybody likes "OXTAIL"

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post #8 of 33

Are beef Rouladen too much work ?

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post #9 of 33

A beef consommee double would make a nice starter ?

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post #10 of 33

Did you consider a beef in aspic to be a bit different ?

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post #11 of 33

Or a "Stroganoff"

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post #12 of 33

And if you include some kind of "Wellington" you have covered most of the better known beef classics.

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post #13 of 33

If you think your client needs to be offered more choices, thers is always a brisket awailable,or a beef bourguignonne.Some can't do without a primerib while others prefers a whole roasted entercote. Can you make a great Steak Diane or a classical peppersteak with a brandy sauce ? A potroast or a sauerbraten could also be mentioned.

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post #14 of 33

For 6 courses that will be mostly beef you'll have to think outside of the typical box.  Personally I don't think filet mignon should be the last course, it's more a middle course.  Last course should be the heaviest so I'd do a braised short rib.  Beef can be heavy so you'll have to think of ways to lighten everything up.  Not ever course should be beef by the way, a salad and a palette cleanser and dessert should round out the meal and their presence will highlight and contrast the beef courses.

Here's my progression, very small courses.

 

- light tomato beef broth with mushrooms and crouton.

- beef carpaccio and arugula salad

- ragu of beef and pork with tagliatelle

- grilled strip steak with roasted potatoes

- sorbet

- duo of braised short rib on pomme puree with gremolata and filet mignon wrapped in bacon and pickled carrots.

- panna cotta with fresh berries

 

Geez even that's too heavy!

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post #15 of 33

just playing around with some ideas:

 

1st Course: Anticucuhos, a Peruvian appetizer of Beef Heart; brushed with an Ancho Beer Marinade, then grilled, and topped with  Huacatay Aji, a spicy Lime Mint Vinaigrette

 

2nd Course: Korean Beef Soup, a spicy Broth of shredded Brisket garnished with Scallions, Tofu, and Noodles; topped with a chiffonade of Omelet and drizzled with a Ginger, Sesame, Garlic, Black Pepper Sauce

 

3rd Course: Tokyo Seared Carpaccio, Tenderloin coated with Togarishi, a Japanese condiment of chilies, seaweed, sesame, and orange zest, then pan seared rare, thinly sliced and served with a yuzu wasabi vinaigrette

 

4th Course: Java Deluxe Steak, a New York, coated with cracked roasted Coffee Beans and Szechwan Peppercorns, grilled; topped with a Malay Onion Sambal

 

5th Course: Filetto Cambozola, Filet Mignon medallions wrapped with pancetta, topped with Cambozola, grilled and served with a Red Wine Demi Glace Sauce

 

6th Course: Steak Salad, a Flank Steak brushed with a Kumquat, Garlic, and Green Peppercorn Paste, grilled, thinly sliced and served on  Arugula, and with Citrus Vinaigrette tossed Kumquats and Vidalia Onions

 

7th Course: Mincemeat Tartlettes with a Rum, Black Pepper, Citrus Zest Sauce

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post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

just playing around with some ideas:

 

1st Course: Anticucuhos, a Peruvian appetizer of Beef Heart; brushed with an Ancho Beer Marinade, then grilled, and topped with  Huacatay Aji, a spicy Lime Mint Vinaigrette

 

2nd Course: Korean Beef Soup, a spicy Broth of shredded Brisket garnished with Scallions, Tofu, and Noodles; topped with a chiffonade of Omelet and drizzled with a Ginger, Sesame, Garlic, Black Pepper Sauce

 

3rd Course: Tokyo Seared Carpaccio, Tenderloin coated with Togarishi, a Japanese condiment of chilies, seaweed, sesame, and orange zest, then pan seared rare, thinly sliced and served with a yuzu wasabi vinaigrette

 

4th Course: Java Deluxe Steak, a New York, coated with cracked roasted Coffee Beans and Szechwan Peppercorns, grilled; topped with a Malay Onion Sambal

 

5th Course: Filetto Cambozola, Filet Mignon medallions wrapped with pancetta, topped with Cambozola, grilled and served with a Red Wine Demi Glace Sauce

 

6th Course: Steak Salad, a Flank Steak brushed with a Kumquat, Garlic, and Green Peppercorn Paste, grilled, thinly sliced and served on  Arugula, and with Citrus Vinaigrette tossed Kumquats and Vidalia Onions

 

7th Course: Mincemeat Tartlettes with a Rum, Black Pepper, Citrus Zest Sauce

 

Well jeez, now looking over my menu and comparing it to yours I sound like a bumpkin redface.gif

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post #17 of 33

Huzeretin(Dutch meat salad)  sliced vey thin beef, slicd thin dill pickle, sliced red onion ,chopped capers, sliced thin red peppers.   Toss all in a lite mustard sauce with a small amount of ground caraway seed  s&p  . serve with roasted julianne of beets on boston lettuce cup. Great way to get rid of any kind of leftover cooked beef. Sheraton hotel chain used this 40 years ago in it's Dutch concept restaurants.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #18 of 33

Nice menu interesting concepts.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #19 of 33
Thread Starter 

Gee, i feel like a piker now...

 

All excellent ideas, but remember as a personal chef, i can't cook off site, so anything with a longer prep time than 2 hours is out...

 

Love the short ribs idea though....MB

post #20 of 33

 Mike ,you have  a very nice collection if ideas here and  I would like to know what you are going to offer to your client.

And then I am curious to find out what your client is going to pick as his choices for his Birthday Party.

Do you have any idea yet of how many guests are going to be there?

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post #21 of 33

Beef tartar (your seasoning) with pine nuts and pear julienne, shave of parm.

 

Tartar (your seasoning) on croustini and a horseradish chip

 

Tartar, slightly spicey, classic garni (quail egg ) crouton, gingered carrot flowers.

 

Beef cheeks in a shiraz sauce

 

Entrecote with ponzu sauce, ginger chutney.

 

Petals.

Petals
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Baby Cake
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Victorian cupcakes
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
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post #22 of 33
Thread Starter 

Hello Berndy el al...

 

I have looked over all the options and we have settled on the following menu for our "beef only" dinner for 10...

 

Beef Carpaccio, with capers, lemon and parmesan cheese

Thai Beef Salad, featuring savoy cabbage, bean sprouts, carrots and Asian dressing

Grilled Beef Tenderloin, with mushroom risotto

Chef’s Dry Aged Prime Rib, grilled asparagus and carrots

Slow Braised Beef Short Ribs, with garlic mashed potatoes

Crème Brule, for dessert

 

Thoughts??

post #23 of 33

You said that you only have  2 hours of prep-time and I feel you are rushing, both  your Prime Rib and your Short Ribs.

Lets assume your guests are on time.and you give them 15 min. each for the 3 first courses to be served and eaten . Your Prime Rib will take at least 3 hours of cooking time and at least an additional 20 min of resting time before you can serve it. Your Short Ribs will be done  before the Prime Rib and therefore I would serve the Short Ribs before the Prime Rib.

Thats my thinking.

But then I have never done an on-site catering job like this. I always worked in a restaurant like setting only.

Best of Luck to you

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post #24 of 33

- do the short ribs off site the day before and chill in liquid.   they will benefit from the rest and chill.  re-therm and grill to finish.   (this is an excellent item to do sous-vide, a few days in advance)

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

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post #25 of 33

Maybe add a soup - beef broth, thin strips of sirloin, mushrooms and some dried cherries.

 

mjb.

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post #26 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Benninger View Post

Hello Berndy el al...

 

I have looked over all the options and we have settled on the following menu for our "beef only" dinner for 10...

 

Beef Carpaccio, with capers, lemon and parmesan cheese

Thai Beef Salad, featuring savoy cabbage, bean sprouts, carrots and Asian dressing

Grilled Beef Tenderloin, with mushroom risotto

Chef’s Dry Aged Prime Rib, grilled asparagus and carrots

Slow Braised Beef Short Ribs, with garlic mashed potatoes

Crème Brule, for dessert

 

Thoughts??

 

Beef Carpaccio - I would add a little green salad (arugula which compliments beef so well) to add a bit of green and freshness to the dish. 

 

Tenderloin - if you're comfortable with the idea of sous vide it would add a nice contrast to the prime rib and short rib.

 

Creme Brule - a bit heavy, must be served with macerated berries or go with a lemon panna cotta instead with blood orange gelee.  You'll need something bright and acidic to balance out the fattiness of the previous courses.

 

An all-beef menu sounds like a dream.  But no matter how much one loves beef there it has to be interspersed with bits of freshness that will contrast the heaviness of the beef.

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post #27 of 33

Carpaccio: I like to use whole grain mustard, very sparingly if you're also adding capers.

Brulee: Quite rich after all that beef.  Consider adding maybe some mint somehow, something "refreshing."  Perhaps not in the dessert but an agua fresca to go with it.  I'd go with fresh berries instead of macerated myself, not discrediting Koukouvagia's post.  Maybe even venture into currants.

post #28 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by RBandu View Post

Carpaccio: I like to use whole grain mustard, very sparingly if you're also adding capers.

Brulee: Quite rich after all that beef.  Consider adding maybe some mint somehow, something "refreshing."  Perhaps not in the dessert but an agua fresca to go with it.  I'd go with fresh berries instead of macerated myself, not discrediting Koukouvagia's post.  Maybe even venture into currants.

 

As if you could go wrong with berries, macerated or not smile.gif

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post #29 of 33

Haha No, no, not at all.  I just find the fresh ones to hold their acidity better than the macerated ones.  This is not so say you shouldn't macerate some berries and "drizzle" in addition for garnish.  There's a whole lotta love happening right there.  Brulee is its own special thing.   I'm standing firm on that.  Garnish, however it's consumed, changes that dish.  Sometimes they ignore the garnish and just eat the brulee.   I like to serve mine with super-fresh raspberries (just 2) or a strawberry fan (when they're in season) and a tiny pool of creme anglais, merely for enjoying with the garnish.   

post #30 of 33
Thread Starter 

To everyone thanks...to recap the off board conversations...I offered a broth, but the client declined...I offered a tartar, the client declined...,the beef short ribs will boneless but with added bones for richness, the timing will be tight, but doable (I may pre-sear them that afternoon)...the prime ribs will be cut from single bone prime ribs "steaks" grilled med-rare, 30 minutes total time...creme brulee is a client request, she loves it, couldn't have it while she was pregnant...starts Friday at 6pm, should be good fun...

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