or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Equipment Reviews › Chinese cleavers vs. Japanese cleavers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chinese cleavers vs. Japanese cleavers

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

What are your opinions on Chinese and Japanese styled cleavers? Made by either a Japanese knife company or a Chinese company. I see there are many high quality carbon steel "Chinese styled" cleavers made by Japanese companies. The Chinese made Chinese cleavers look to be of inferior quality. 

 

In use, do you find Japanese made Chinese styled cleavers better or Japanese made Japanese style cleavers more to your liking. 

 

Cleaver recommendations?

 

And after having spent time with your cleaver do you (home cooks) find yourselves only using the cleaver? (chopping and slicing) Using only a utility knife for peeling or cutting small vegetables or fruits. Curious. 

post #2 of 14

If you want to try out a cleaver, this is the guy to try by all accounts.   I have not tried one, but have heard it recommended time and time again and the reviews are always through the roof.   The best part?   Under $40!!!!!!!!

 

 

http://www.chefknivestogo.com/cckcleaver2.html

post #3 of 14

The CCK is a great value cleaver but the Suien is the go to cleaver if you want to step up a bit. The Sugimoto is the caddy but that's about twice as much as the Suien.

 

http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/kitchen-knives/suien/suien-vc-chinese-cleaver.html

 

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/ChineseCleaver.html

 

 

Dave 

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #4 of 14
There are quite a few Japanese versions of Japanese, "cleaver" style knives going beyond the two brands mentioned here. Many, if not most of the big name Japanese makers have at least one model, and quite a few have many. The Japanese name for the style is chukabocho. For what it's worth, nearly all chukabocho that you'll find are MUCH better made than Chinese made knives and are significantly more expensive.

If you just want to dabble to see if you like using one, the CCK knives are very good. The standard Chinese style knife in this country are made by Dexter and are usually referred to as Green River -- which is the location of the plant where they're made. They're not competition for better chukabocho, but Green Rivers are well made. Most of the Chinese knives, including CCK, are crude by comparison.

You've probably noticed that I've been dancing around the word "cleaver." That's because there's a difference between a Chinese knife meant for ordinary prep, and the heavy sorts meant for chopping through bone. Because there's so much metal required to make their wide bodies, the knives are inherently heavy and you want to go as light or almost as light as possible for something you'll use for a lot of prep. So make sure you're buying the right knife for your purposes.

Some people absolutely LOVE them. I never felt the need to move beyond an ordinary, western style, chef's knife (or gyuto), but a friend convinced me to try a Green River for a few weeks, and I've also played with a CCK and a Masamoto. I didn't like them at all, but that shouldn't mean too much to you. Worth trying for a couple of weeks to see where you stand. Buy something relatively inexpensive, and if you don't like it you should be able to get half back on E-Bay. Obviously, since they're so polarizing it's not a good idea to start with a $400 chukabocho.

BDL
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys for your recommendations. Have spotted the CCK knives at JCK. 

 

But functionally...for prep work (e.g. chopping carrots, celery, onions...etc.) would you prefer a Japanese style (smaller, not as heavy or wide from cutting edge to spine...like the one from MAC or Kasumi) or a Chinese style (designed by a Japanese company or Chinese company)? If you do use them or have.

 

Will have to see if CCK brand cleavers are sold in Toronto (where I'm originally from...currently living in LA till the end of the year).

post #6 of 14
The lighter the better, the better the quality of workmanship the better, the better the quality of blade alloy the batter -- all of which argues towards a Japanese made knife. However, each of those also means more expensive -- which is probably not the best thing for a first knife of the type.

Since you live in Los Angeles, why not run down to Action Supplies on Atlantic in Monterey Park and pick up a Green River or something cheap. If I'm not mistaken they sell a couple of CCK made knives as well. Besides Action, a lot of the pro suppliers in the SGV, as well as some of the larger supers have a decent selection of Chinese style knives. Don't invest in an expensive knife until you know whether or not you at least like the type.

Why wait until you're back in Canada, eh? Do it here where the ordering is easy and the prices -- by and large -- more competitive.

BDL
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

Just found out a local mall in Toronto has a CCK shop. Carrying what looks like in the photo the complete line. http://www.chanchikee.com/toronto.htm

 

Knives more competitively priced here in LA? Than Toronto? Why do you say this? Based on the prices you saw on the Slice & Sear website I posted a while back on another forum? Or do you know people in TO? :) Just curious. Though, even if pricing is better down here I won't be buying here then shipping up. I'm assuming the shipping cost will make it not worth the trouble. I could be wrong. Still, I do plan to go to my local shop to handle and take a look at some knives in-person any way...so i'll likely end up buying there (except a CCK cleaver...if I do).

 

And yes Action Sales in Monterey do carry CCK cleavers http://www.actionsales.com/categorysearch.aspx?product=cleaver&number=1 . Might pay them a visit.

 

It's a shame the Chinese food here (SoCal) is pitiful. But I digress...

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDD8 View Post

Just found out a local mall in Toronto has a CCK shop. Carrying what looks like in the photo the complete line. http://www.chanchikee.com/toronto.htm

 

 

 

Thanks for posting that link. I'll add that to my list of stops the next time we head over to Toronto. Have you tried Susser Lee's place?

 

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi Dave,

 

No I haven't. Have heard of him of course. Do you live in the burbs? Or just outside of TO? :) 

 

I love good food but in unpretentious eateries. Which is why I probably haven't made any real efforts to try any of his restaurants like LEE (http://www.susur.com/lee/index.html). You would see him pop up on local cooking themed shows. Food days on CityTV. Etc. 

 

Plus, I'm not really into "foodie" style plates where they focus on presentation and microscopic meals. Not my thing. But I will try almost anything once. So who knows...

post #10 of 14

I'm North of Detroit so TO is a pretty easy drive from here.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

"...easy drive..."??? Dave, you would fit in well down here in LA. Not uncommon to spend the day driving all over LA for entertainment, shopping for cooking ingredients and good eats. And no problem about the link. A chance for you to come up to TO to try some good Chinese food (excellent by LA standards)...any how back to "cleavers"...


Edited by BDD8 - 5/24/12 at 4:49pm
post #12 of 14

Have you tried either of these shops?

 

https://toshoknifearts.com/

 

http://knifetoronto.com/

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

Have you tried either of these shops?

 

https://toshoknifearts.com/

 

http://knifetoronto.com/

I know of those 2 shops. Have their websites bookmarked. Might visit Tosho as they carry Fujiwara and Takeda. Though, Tosho only carries one of Fujiwara's knives (perhaps they can order others). Did you just Google them? How did you know about those 2 shops? Have you bought knives from either of the two?

post #14 of 14

I saw these links on another forum this morning and remembered this thread. Looks like I'm going to have to make a visit to Toronto soon. Time to visit Casa del Habano and go knife shopping. ;)

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Equipment Reviews
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Food & Equipment Reviews › Cooking Equipment Reviews › Chinese cleavers vs. Japanese cleavers