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Opening a B&B - Page 2

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by gedeb View Post

Thank you to all that have responded. I have taken your suggestions to heart, and I really appreciate your words of wisdom.

To update, I've been cooking for about 3 weeks now; I have a couple of solid signature dishes, including rosemary popovers, crepe squares, granola, and baked eggs with goat cheese and fresh herbs. I've found one local farmer's market, so there have been plenty of fresh fruit and veggies to use in scones, muffins, quiches, frittatas. The tricky part is timing. We serve breakfast from 8:30-9:30, and if I'm not making a dish to order, I'm having trouble holding some of my favorite casseroles, and having them look and taste as fresh at 9:15 as it did at 8:30. But I'm learning as I go along!

 

Well, if the casserole thing really is a problem, you could do two smaller casseroles and time them so that they come out of the oven about 30 minutes apart. 

 

Just take your normal recipe and divide it between two smaller dishes. The cooking time might change so you'll have to adapt, but it would allow your later guests to get a hot, fresh casserole out of the oven. 

 

I dunno, just an idea. I don't think most people would mind a re-heating in the oven as well, just be careful it doesn't dry out obviously. 


Sounds like things are going well for you...keep at it!

post #32 of 34

I once owned a med sized coffee, sandwich place in Queens. N.Y.

 One of the first things I did in morning was saute a huge pan of onions and put muffins in oven. I had a transome fan over front door and in the kitchen I put a big fan to blow the aroma of onions and muffins to the street.

   Many people told me this induced them to come in when walking by. Worked for me try it in B&B Kitchen.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #33 of 34

Ed ... that is one of the most simple pieces of brilliant information I've read in a while.  Even though it doesn't help me much, TY for that input.  That starts my day nicely. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #34 of 34

Sometimes it just comes down to kitchen equipment...like a convection oven up to a certain point for your casseroles, hold chilled maybe and in the i5 just before service for temp and color...eggs are such a tricky protein.....That's one thing I haven't encountered yet at school, holding casseroles for a line

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