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The Boardsmith boards

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

His boards are so beautiful I would almost be too afraid to use it. :) How durable are they really? 

 

I love the darker woods like mahogany, walnut and cherry. But maple is traditionally the #1 choice. How do they compare in toughness? How hard would it be for me to damage them? Using ultra sharp Japanese knives (e.g. Fujiwara, Takeda...etc.Slicing, dicing and chopping with a cleaver) or taking 2 very sharp Chinese cleavers to chop simultaneously to dice as if doing a "drum roll".

 

Are all the woods used not easy to stain? 

 

I'm considering an order later on. Probably in a 16x22x2 size. 18x24x2 might be too big. Will have to see.

post #2 of 8
We have two, large boards in our kitchen. One is a round, 19" dia, 3" thick, end-grain maple Boos, purchased at SLT. The other is a 2 x 18 x 24, end-grain mahogany Boardsmith, ordered directly from Dave. We've owned each for a little more than a year.

Each are as good as any board I've owned in the past, and far better than most. In my opinion, the Boardsmith is well worth the money for its combination of construction quality and beauty.

In the past, I've tried to save money with boards which were "merely" functional and long lasting from WalMart, Home Depot, etc., but with the exception of the Boos side-grain boards they used to sell years ago at Smart & Final, they didn't hold up well. Before you get excited, those Boos side grain boards were a long time ago; and to my mind Boos side-grain doesn't offer enough price advantage over end-grain to make sense anymore.

Remember, that end grain "heals" faster and better than side grain, and consequently doesn't scratch as easily. And because the pattern is more complex, what scratches it holds don't show up as much. And -- in a home kitchen anyway -- looks count.

There are a lot of makers out there, many of whom look pretty interesting in terms of price/quality, and some of whom have good reputations. However, when I bought my last set of boards I wanted something I KNEW was really good, and didn't mind spending the few extra bucks to buy a Boardsmith.

Within a couple of days of putting in the order, my wife fell in love with the big, round Boos block -- and for the same reasons I didn't mind buying that either. Plus, there's the whole "happy wife" thing.

If you've got someone local who stands behind his work, or you fall in love with a board at a store with really good customer support (such as SLT), go for it. But otherwise...

So... comparing apples to apples, Boardsmith doesn't cost meaningfully more or less than boards of similar beauty and quality. Plus, you know in advance that you're getting the best -- and that assurance is worth a lot.

BDL
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post #3 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by BDD8 View Post

 How hard would it be for me to damage them? Using ultra sharp Japanese knives or taking 2 very sharp Chinese cleavers to chop simultaneously to dice as if doing a "drum roll".

 

 Take some time to look through Davids blog and look for his post about suing a customer that returned a board he felt had been used for just cutting pizza. Then ask again abut dualing cleavers. lol.gif

I don't suggest any board with feet. Using a board like that with cleavers is going to be hard on any board but the thicker the better.

I'll have to dig but I have some photos of some boardsmith boards in pretty rough shape.

I'd suggest looking at all of the complaints with BS on ChowHound as well.

Stick with Maple no matter what brand you buy unless you want a display piece.

 

Dave


Edited by DuckFat - 5/28/12 at 8:56am
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #4 of 8

BoardSmith's are the gold standard of beauty and utilitarian.  Check out Philadelphia Custom Block and Board.  For a lower price you get an excellent nice looking board but without the feet.  BoardSmith uses very large pieces of end grain wood while Philadelphia, Boos and others use smaller pieces but should still last a lifetime.  

 

http://www.blockandboard.com/brands/Philadelphia-Custom-Block-and-Board.html

 

I made feet for my Philadelphia board as it gives some cushoning on a hard counter top and allows for air flow after I wash it and oil it.  Unless you're doing an awful lot of butchering with a cleaver I think feet are a plus.

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys. I guess I'll stick with maple. Though BDL has the mahogany version of TBS boards. He sounded happy with his for the time he's had with his. 

 

I probably won't do a double cleaver drum roll dicing. Just wondered how boards would stand up to that kind of abuse. :)

 

Will look into Phili boards. Never heard of them till now. Boos yes at SLT. That was where I noticed them. Will check Williams-Sonoma for the heck of it. See what they carry.

post #6 of 8

If you really want to do heavy cleaver work look for butchers block. Boos and Michigan Maple Block still make them up to 16" thick.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckFat View Post

If you really want to do heavy cleaver work look for butchers block. Boos and Michigan Maple Block still make them up to 16" thick.

 

Dave

HAHA!! I'm sure that would look great in my kitchen...a 16" thick block...:) Unless of course I get a custom island made w/ that 16" thick block. :) Then i'd have an indestructible block. :) Will look up MMB anyway. Boos products I can find without too much trouble...though a 16" thick block? CRIKEY!

post #8 of 8

I think both boos and MMB do custom tops. Some of the Islands I've seen built like that are very cool but not that thick. They do smaller 12" thick tables as well. I see the 16" thick Boos version at SLT and WS from time to time used as display pieces but I think Boos is now strapping the corners on their version with metal.

No idea on the price point between the two brands. I keep hoping to find a used one at a yard sale!

 

Dave

 

 

http://www.mapleblock.com/detail/monarch-meat-block-16/

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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