ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Cherries Are In Season
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cherries Are In Season - Page 2

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

UUMMM, I think I might be in hot water here...

I thought that I'd check the mason jars that they were filled with enough vodka

I turned them over and there is just a small air bubble

So I opened one of the jars,

and the cherries are BUBBLING

Like effervescent type of bubbling

Is it suppose to do that? Anybody?

Mine are in the fridge. Heat causes fermentation so you definitly want to keep your jars in a cool dark place. I have jars from 5 years ago and they still look and taste great.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #32 of 46
Thread Starter 

So Miss Petals, we keep our home at about 74 degrees and I have the two mason jars in the pantry.

Will the fruit still be tasty?  I figure that the alcohol will be nicely flavored by the cherries.  We don’t drink vodka, but I was thinking of making just a small jar and try it just to make sure it’s o-key-dokey before I give them as gifts to someone else and poison them …

post #33 of 46

If you're going to do duck with the cherries, here's a recipe of mine. 

 

1 cup of chocolate wine

1/2 cup of captain morgan rum

1 tsp of crushed pink peppercorn

 

Reduce and add butter

 

Next saute the cherries and add them into risotto along with a cup of shredded coconut. 

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

So Miss Petals, we keep our home at about 74 degrees and I have the two mason jars in the pantry.

Will the fruit still be tasty?  I figure that the alcohol will be nicely flavored by the cherries.  We don’t drink vodka, but I was thinking of making just a small jar and try it just to make sure it’s o-key-dokey before I give them as gifts to someone else and poison them …

 

 

I wash and dry fresh cherries, wash and sterilize my jars, add sugar, cherries (you can have short stems) fill with brandy, seal.  Once that is done I turn them upside down after an hour or so to dissolve the sugar. Put right side up, then after a few days they are stored in fridge. The end result is a thin syrup like liquid and sweet  brandied cherries.

 

Similar  way they do here  : http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1766,132181-240193,00.html  I have never used vodka  or made them without  sugar so I cannot tell you how your cherries are going to taste.

 

We make our own wine and the last thing you want is fermentation at the wrong time.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #35 of 46

Not in that alcohol, no you should not be getting fermentation.  Release the pressure and reseal them and see what they do.  Lactobacillus can only tolerate up to around 8%.  You'll know if a pellicle begins to form on the surface.  In straight Vodka, I really doubt it.

 

Sorry my brain was tripping...


Edited by zoebisch - 6/11/12 at 8:23am
post #36 of 46

"In straight Vodka, I really doubt it."

 

Agreed. When using sugar it is a different story. You must put them in the fridge to stop the fermentation (regarding the way mine are made). I agree with pressure canning, we do it here.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #37 of 46
Thread Starter 

let me make sure that I have this ...

by putting cherries into a mason jar and poring straight vodka over the top and keeping them in a cool dark place

I will achieve sour cherries but tasty vodka?

Is that right?

I don't want to make a sweet cordial type of liquor, I just want to infuse the vodka but still have it as a vodka

and if the cherries will taste nasty then I'll just be sure to inform the reciepent eat at our own risk ..

post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaneohegirlinaz View Post

I will achieve sour cherries but tasty vodka?

Is that right?

Maybe, maybe not :D.  You just have to see what happens.  I'm sure others have done it.  Every time that I preserve or immerse something in a neutral spirit the results can be as expected or often totally different than what I was anticipating.  This will change over time and is a temperature sensitive process (higher temperatures accelerate these changes, lower ones impede...in general).  So the best thing is to experiment and when you nail it, record what you did.  Record what you did if it messes up, that way you can isolate what it is you didn't like and correct it.  I am curious did you relieve the pressure on the cans? 

post #39 of 46
Thread Starter 

@ zoebisch

I did open up one of the Mason jars and that's how I saw the bubbles coming up, and I'm talking about tiny, fine champagne type of bubbles, and I didn't think to record any of this, VERY good point.  So I just now checked both jars, one top gives (pops back in) just a little and the other is rock solid.

I see in today's newspaper ads that Cherries have dropped in price, so I'll see if I want to try Petals thoughts one trying one jar with sugar and putting them in the 'fridge.

post #40 of 46

In case you ever end up with a basket of cherries needing TLC again, I love pickling them whole (without the pit). I use white wine vinegar, sugar, and pure almond extract, but you can decide on what spices best suit your palate. I can them in wide mouth pints. Then in the winter, I gobble them up on roasted chicken and various desserts. I think they are perfect on chicken. The dark syrup is gorgeous streaming off the white meat. OK, I'm making myself hungry. Time for a snack. Nom, nom, nom...

post #41 of 46
Thread Starter 

Update:

Mister K~girl and I went to visit with friends this weekend and I took one of these Cherry Vodkas with us as a Hostess gift.  What was one of the first things the Missus and I did?  Crack that baby open!

 

700

 

 

 

Cherry-tinis! (I had one more at home, had to make sure that the second "jar" that I made was okay, right?) 

They were good and so were the Cherries.  I don’t drink hard liquor anymore but wanted to try it. 

What a beautiful ruby color liquid, unbelievable Cherry flavor and the bouquet was a-maz-ing! 

DH popped one of the Cherries into his mouth and started to choke.  HE DOESN’T DRINK! 

He didn’t think that they fruit would have picked up that much of the alcohol, but oh baby!!  It sure did. 

So I think that I’ll need to make more, Christmas is coming! 

These make a great gift, our Host and Hostess truly appreciated it. 

post #42 of 46
Thread Starter 

Now I have one more question, now that I've opened this last jar of vodka with the cherries in there, the cherries are floating to the top and a small portion of the fruit is now above the liquor.

Will the fruit spoil?

Do I need to keep it in the 'fridge?

post #43 of 46

K-girl, hi! I'm mostly German, so my grandparents were pretty diligent about making flavored alcohol, rumtopf, etc.  I have a beautiful wide mouth Mason of blackberry vodka here in my kitchen that is fun to sip on occasion! I can only guess as to whether or not your process is going to work. I can tell you that once my mother (bless her, she can't boil water) "canned" green beans (i.e., she didn't process them), and not only did the lids bulge, but the jars exploded one at a time in the basement, delivering quite a stink for a long time to come!  (BTW, I didn't learn to can from her! My father sent me every weekend to my grandmother and great-grandmother who operated restaurants, and my tutoring was completed with them.)

 

But I can offer some ideas for next time:

 

- Most flavored alcohols use a little sugar (we use 1/2 cup sugar per quart of fruit/alcohol). Sugar is a preservative, and perhaps it helps the fact that the percentage of alcohol in vodka, for example, is lowered when you introduce a fruit that adds water to the mixture. 

 

- Whether pickling, preserving in alcohol, or whatever method of food preservation I'm going to use, I ask myself, how will the fruit be preserved all the way through its middle? (i.e., how will the dangerous bacteria be removed.)

 

In the case of alcohol preservation, I always either prick the fruit with a fork or tong, or I slightly crush or peel the fruit. Cherries have a very thick skin, which is why after months of soaking in liquid, they retain a lovely shape. They have a rigidity. Thus, it's hard for preserving alcohol to penetrate unless they are pricked or at the very least, pitted. Other berries have thinner skins, like blackberries and raspberries. I don't prick them, and they soak up the alcohol.  Same question is asked when one uses heat as a method of preservation: how long will it take the appropriate temperature to reach the very core of the fruit? If a fruit is very this, or a jam quite viscous, it takes a while longer for the internal temperature to rise. You're using alcohol instead of heat. How will that alcohol penetrate the fruit?

 

Here the recipe for cherry brandy that I've enjoyed:

 

one lb. cherries

1/2 cup sugar

a little almond extract if you want (I love this)

2.5 cups brandy

 

Prick the cherries with a sharp object (tongs, needle, toothpick)

Layer the cherries and sugar evenly in a 1-quart jar.

Add the almond extract, then enough brandy to cover the cherries. 

Shake the jar and put it somewhere dark for 3-5 months. Shake the jar occasionally.

Pour the mixture through a few layers of cheesecloth into a new, clean jar or bottle.

Prost!

post #44 of 46
Thread Starter 

Beautiful, thank you jamlady!  I just got a pint of Raspberries yesterday that are WAY to sour to eat, I'll try this method!

post #45 of 46
Thread Starter 

I know that this thread is a bit old, but we had THE most fantastic cherries ever while in Montana.

 

I have never heard of these before, Flathead Cherries from the Flathead Valley region (we were in Whitefish Montana).  It was right at the end of the season, so I could only find this small amount and also some jelly.   

post #46 of 46
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Cherries Are In Season