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Charbroiler gradients?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Odd question, I guess.  We use an older model charbroiler with no gradients on the dials.  Anyone know of a quick fix or an add-on I could install to ensure consistency?  

post #2 of 10

Cook something and when you find an acceptabl;e temp mark the dial and the plate behind it by scratching a mark there.. Most dials ar universal as far as attaching and the way they are notched.so try to get another if possible maybe off an old stove.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Could do that, but the knobs themselves are stainless and are set about an inch away from the unit itself.  I've considered just sharpee-ing on a few ticks but I have no way of doing it for the knob itself and the unit is so sensitive a fraction of an inch makes a huge difference.  I'll take a photo and post it so you can see.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Cook something and when you find an acceptabl;e temp mark the dial and the plate behind it by scratching a mark there.. Most dials ar universal as far as attaching and the way they are notched.so try to get another if possible maybe off an old stove.

 

LOL!  That's old school for sure.  :D

post #5 of 10

Yeah I always wondered how to do the same.  At my job we have 2 long hot spots on the grill that turn that part white,and it sucks because we really cannot cook on those parts.  The only good thing about those spots are that they put grill marks on things fast.

post #6 of 10

For grill marks thats the way it should be.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocktrns View PostThe only good thing about those spots are that they put grill marks on things fast.

 

 

Pittsburgh Rare.

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #8 of 10
I have the same issue with the grill/flatop I work on, nudge the knob a wee bit and it ends up to hot, go by flame height. What I do is crank the knob all the way then drop the flame by half and its about right.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

@rocktrns:  Turn...the flame down.  If that doesn't work, or if you have a grill that just has the on/off knob, they all have adjustable points that you'll have to use a screwdriver to change.  If you hate it and you don't use a marking area on your grill, check it out or post a pic of your setup and I'll tell you where to find it.  Mine's adjustable and the fine tuning screws are right by the knobs.  Post a few pics, front and front underside angle.

 

My menu has everything from sirloins to strips to filets and ribeyes to salmon to chicken...every area of my grill has a different setting.  I'd only ever use a white-hot spot for something super thin or just marking before finishing in the convection (@sshats that want a well-done filet.  Make them wait.).

post #10 of 10
You need to play with different meats. Watch the flame as your guide. It is a more reliable way then marking the knob, as outside temperature changes adjustments need to be made depending on different factors.
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