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Nacho cheese sauce - Page 2

post #31 of 43

chef ed is right,   i would say over 90%

post #32 of 43

I don't get what Ed and Spike are saying.  Most restaurants, perhaps far more than 90%, serve bad food.  So what?  

 

There's no "right" way to make Nachos, and not even an "authentic" way, or one with much of a claim on either Mexico or tradition either.  Whether you choose to use or avoid processed cheese is simply a choice. 

 

BDL 

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post #33 of 43

Outside of the recipe-story that I posted, this is the most solid comment in this thread.

Quote:
There's no "right" way to make Nachos, and not even an "authentic" way, or one with much of a claim on either Mexico or tradition either.  Whether you choose to use or avoid processed cheese is simply a choice.

 

Nice point BDL

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

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post #34 of 43
Thread Starter 

I should clarify.  I am not hoping to make a nacho cheese sauce that resembles the tostidos queso.  I am not looking for it to have the same texture or flavor.  I know that it doesn't taste or behave like real cheese.  I don't mind if it's stringy.  It is not something I plan on serving to anyone but myself, so I'm not worried that it will harden because it won't last long enough to cool.  I just want a bowl of real cheese to dip my tortillas in.  I want to use cream cheese in it too, did I say that before?  Thanks everyone for your ideas, this is not a thread about the wonders of Velveeta, I don't view it as a real food product and will not be using it no matter how much someone points out its good qualities.

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post #35 of 43

ICEMAN   I AGREE  (to each his own) and looking at your listed ingredients it is a cheese

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #36 of 43

Koukouvagia -- It appears you don't know exactly what you want -- which is fine. 

 

There's a style of Nachos -- perhaps the original -- which is simply cheese melted on chips.  Obviously, the cheese will re-solidify very quickly if that's all you do.  I don't think that's what you want though, or you'd already be doing it. 

 

You can build a platform for experimenting with different cheeses and flavor profiles by starting with either a fondue recipe or beginning as you would for making "creamy" style macaroni.  Rarebit recipes might be another productive path -- I certainly like the idea of beer in the Nachos.

 

The first uses a flour or starch based slurry and continuing heat to hold its texture; the second, a roux based bechamel (dairy) or veloute (stock). 

 

Using any of the three techniques you're looking for cheeses with good melting properties. 

 

Because you haven't spoken about your desired flavored profile(s), I can't make suggestions about cheeses other than to say (1) I don't think you'll get any benefit from Mexican cheeses (such as "Chihuahua" or "Oaxaca") which you can't get from more commonly available and less expensive cheeses like "Monterey jack" for instance; (2) the typical "Nacho" cheese flavor is very close to cheddar/jack.

 

FWIW, that's not a recommendation, only an FYI.

 

Why cream cheese?

 

Just as a throwaway towards a very basic and typical "Nacho" with some good technique twists:  Start by browning some onions lightly along with some fire roasted, peeled seeded and coarsely chopped jalapenos; add flour and cook the raw off it.  Add a chopped canned chipotle (for smokiness, sweetness and heat), along with some of the adobo (for complexity).  Add chicken stock with a healthy splash of beer, pinch of dry or dijon mustard (cheese loves mustard), raise the heat to max and cook until the "veloute" completely thickens (to about nappe stiffness) -- usually about three minutes on the boil, stirring (or whisking) as you go.  Reduce to a bare simmer, add grated pepper jack, and a decent sharp cheddar (50/50), and stir (or whisk) as it melts to keep everything smooth.  When the cheese melted, I'd season with a few splashes of hot sauce (to taste) and stir in a bit of chopped cilantro for color and freshness.  

 

If you're sharing with someone who doesn't like chili heat, limit or omit the jalapeno and/or substitute fire-roasted and peeled poblano for it.

 

Hope this helps,

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 6/15/12 at 8:14am
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post #37 of 43

1/4 pound cheddar

1/4 pound monterey jack

2 tablespoons flour

1/8 pound cream cheese

1/2 cup cream or beer

 

toss cheddar and jack with flour

combine cream and cream cheese, put on low heat, when warm slowly add remaining ingredients while stirring

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post #38 of 43

Chef,

1/4 pound cheddar

1/4 pound monterey jack

2 tablespoons flour

1/8 pound cream cheese

1/2 cup cream

 

toss cheddar and jack with flour

combine cream and cream cheese, put on low heat, when warm slowly add remaining ingredients while stirring

No offense, but no seasoning or aromatics at all?  Wouldn't this be incredibly bland?

 

BDL

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post #39 of 43

It is a rough guideline off the top of my head. Seasonings and flavorings would be up to Koukouvagia, whom I figure is more than up to the task. I am suprised you couldn't figure that out.

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post #40 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post


Just as a throwaway towards a very basic and typical "Nacho," I think I'd start by browning some onions lightly along with some fire roasted, peeled seeded and coarsely chopped jalapenos; add flour and cook the raw off it.  Add chicken stock with a healthy splash of beer, and cook until the "veloute" completely thickened (to about nappe stiffness).  Add grated pepper jack, and a decent sharp cheddar (50/50), and stir (or whisk) as it melted to keep everything smooth.  When the cheese melted, I'd season with a few splashes of hot sauce and add some chopped cilantro for color and freshness.  

Good ideas, and similar to what I posted about a Mornay style sauce. I want to point out that how much flour you use is dependent on how much cheese you want to add. You can't add as much cheese with less flour or the sauce breaks. So you need some inkling of cheese impact in mind early on when you're adding and cooking out the flour.

And a squirt of lime juice would be something I think I'd add as well.
post #41 of 43
Thread Starter 

crazy.gif

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post #42 of 43

BDL is right, to each there own, but that first recipe BDL posted sounds awesome!  nothing better then rousted jalapenos!

post #43 of 43

If you make a bechamel (with butter, flour and milk) sauce and add cheddar or whatever will separate because of the high fat content.  On nachos I just melt grated marble cheese over them.  For a nacho cheese dip, I have used whole milk, cornstarch, chili flakes and dried cheese powder from the bulk food section of the grocery store.  Has good consistency and colour.  Velveeta is the easiest way to go for dip,  I have never put a cheese sauce over nachos, only melted in the oven.  I once use Campbell's concentrated cheddar cheese soup.

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