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MAN MADE OR STEM CELL MEAT.

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

With so  many people concerned with sustainable products and the enviorment.  Plus 2 or 3 companies working on vaious processes. How do you feel about consumming man made meat and poultry???

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #2 of 12

I read this article and it was unnerving to say the least. I think I would rather become a vegetarian .

 

 

 

"BEIJING, Nov. 14 (Xinhuanet) -- It is not a sci-fi that humans can nurture meat like vegetables.

Scientists at Oxford University's Wildlife Conservation Research Unit are researching in-vitro meat--burgers or sausages grown in laboratory Petri dishes rather than made from livestock, according to a Reuters report last week.

They are nurturing stem cells got from leftover livestock meat from slaughterhouses. To make them grow up to meat, Mark Post, one of the researchers in the project, said they feed the stem cells with sugars, amino acids, lipids, minerals and all other necessary nutrients.

By now, pale muscle-like strips have been produced. But each strip, 2.5 cm long and less than a centimeter wide, is hardly seen with naked eyes.

Since there was no blood in the meat, it looked pale, a bit like the flesh of scallops, said Post.

As to how it tastes, Post said "it's not very tasty yet," but with the right amounts and right types of fat, perhaps a little lab-grown blood to give it color and iron, it would taste as good as real meat.

The first good-taste hamburger made from the "cultured" meat was expected to be produced by August or September next year, according to Tuomisto, who led the research.

As the world population mounting, the demand for meat is growing. According to the World Health Organization, annual global meat production is projected to increase from 218 million tons in 1997-1999 to 376 million tons by 2030

"Current livestock meat production is just not sustainable," Post told the Reuters, the man-made meat could be an alternative when meat from livestocks was not plenty enough to meet human's demand."

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 12

I dont think it would be or could be sold as meat, but as a meat alternative that is amazing they are able to do it. 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #4 of 12

Dang.  Didn't realize they were that far along.  I really have a hard time buying into this being a panacea for solving demand.  If I have learned one thing as a system engineer is that you have to account for every step and input along the way and it being a more efficient method is a hard sell.  You need power, labs, equipment, etc, etc.  Although my friend did say he has seen the miles of robotically tended hydroponic greenhouses in AZ that grow nothing but tomatoes.  Almost completely automated, so they must be making money right?

 

The more the developed country the higher the demand for meat. It seems to me that the issue has nothing really to do with feeding people but rather this paradigm that consuming high quantities of animal protein in the diet is the end all.  Hey I love meat and eat things that people typically do not but I also appreciate vegetables, fruits and grains very much.  Perhaps the solution is much more simple.  So yeah, I don't buy the sales pitch. They are doing it because they can, that's what scientists do. 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

I remember when artificial crabmeat was first introduced. It was 15% crab. Then they came out with imitation artificial crabmeat which had 0% crab.

      I truly believe that next it will be made from recycled newspaper,hydrolized plant protein,agar, artificial  flavorings and color. In fact even the packaging it comes in may be eaten.  Shades of Soilent Green????  Not science fiction anymore.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 12

I remember "Sea Legs" when I was young, early 80's.  My mother (God bless her) couldn't cook to save her life, and we lived in a rural area so seafood wasn't really an option...until Sea Legs!  Back then it was haddock I think, or Cod, shaped to look like king crab legs.  It was stringy though, had that same "crab" feel to it...but in retrospect after having eaten real king crab....HAHAHAHAHA.  I wonder if they still sell that crap....

 

If you think about it, all someone has to do is invent a machine that can reorganize atoms into different molecules and assemble them.  Hell, we already have the touchpads from Star Trek, I suppose in another 10 years we'll have the "replicators."

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Sea Legs is a brand name and still sold and the fish of choice so they claim today s Haddock.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #8 of 12

You guys seem to be talking about Surimi. Hey it's not crab it's...Krab!  Surimi is at least made from fish.

We have some of the hydroponic hot house tomato factories near us in Ontario. I always find it interesting to see them sold as Organic.

Soylent Green was made in the early 70's and was about the year 2022. Only ten years to go! 

 

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #9 of 12

It's people. Soylent Green is made out of people. They're making our food out of people. Next thing they'll be breeding us like cattle for food. You've gotta tell them. You've gotta tell them!
 

post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 

When Sea Legs brand was first introduced, it was 15% CRAB  it changed later. Now its Krab

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #11 of 12
I think there's a lot of potential in this path.

Currently, this is much more expensive, resource intensive and very low volume. Nor are factors around flavor and texture the goal right now.

I listened to a debate on this topic on NPR a while back. The anti was very much about how unfeasible it is now. And I think he missed the point of where this can lead, not where it is right now.

The first profitable products won't be of culinary quality to interest us, most likely. But I think they will come.
post #12 of 12

I read about them creating "chicken" in the lab. We are nowhere near it being productive to do this. They were having problems with texture because exercise is the only thing that works to make the muscle hold a texture we find appealing. They have to wash it with a solution of chemicals too, that I would suspect is more expensive than chicken feed. Have you guys read "An Omnivores Dilemma"?

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