or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › removing cheesecake from the baking pan
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

removing cheesecake from the baking pan

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

What is the best pan to use bake cheesecakes?  How do remove the bottom of the pan and not disturb the cake? 

 

I've always used a spring form pan and for the occasional cake that's fine.  I'm looking to start baking on a larger scale.  I think I will try a bottomless pan to see how they work and my recipes react to the pan. 

 

I am puzzled about how to remove the cake from the pan so that it can be sold.

post #2 of 11

Well, you do either need the cake pans with the push up bottom, or a springform.  I usually line the bottom of my pan with parchment.  Once the cheesecake is completely chilled, it's pretty easy to slide a cardboard round between the crust and the parchment. I also put a strip of parchment around the inside of the pan.  I find that it makes it easier to remove from the pan and have nicer looking sides.  It peels off cleanly, without have to run a knife around the inside of the pan.  

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks.  i've used spring forms but my current pans have a little lip and that makes it impossible to get at the bottom.  I will try an anodized alumnum pan and see how it work in the bain marie and how hard it it to remove the cake once chilled.

 

I do not use a graham cracker type of crust so I've a little apprehesive about slidnig a cake round under neath.  I'll just have to give it a try using parchment as you suggested on the side and bottom.  I agree that you do not want to run a knife around the sides.

 

Are they any issues with Aluminum pans imarting a metalic taste to the cake?  I was hoping that that will not be an issue with an anodized pan.

post #4 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AObakery View Post

Thanks.  i've used spring forms but my current pans have a little lip and that makes it impossible to get at the bottom.  I will try an anodized alumnum pan and see how it work in the bain marie and how hard it it to remove the cake once chilled.

 

I do not use a graham cracker type of crust so I've a little apprehesive about slidnig a cake round under neath.  I'll just have to give it a try using parchment as you suggested on the side and bottom.  I agree that you do not want to run a knife around the sides.

 

Are they any issues with Aluminum pans imarting a metalic taste to the cake?  I was hoping that that will not be an issue with an anodized pan.


Do you mean that the bottom part of the springform, the plain disk, has a lip?  The lip goes down, not up.  Of you put the springform together with the lip facing down, there will be a smooth side up and you can slide a spatula or knife under it.  Every time someone else does my dishes here, they always put the springform back together with the lip up - for some reason.  That's what made me think of it, but maybe you;re talking about something else?

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #5 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by AObakery View Post

Thanks.  i've used spring forms but my current pans have a little lip and that makes it impossible to get at the bottom.  I will try an anodized alumnum pan and see how it work in the bain marie and how hard it it to remove the cake once chilled.

 

I do not use a graham cracker type of crust so I've a little apprehesive about slidnig a cake round under neath.  I'll just have to give it a try using parchment as you suggested on the side and bottom.  I agree that you do not want to run a knife around the sides.

 

Are they any issues with Aluminum pans imarting a metalic taste to the cake?  I was hoping that that will not be an issue with an anodized pan.

I don't use a water bath, so can't really help with that.  Since you don't use a crust, my only suggestion would be to freeze it to make it solid enough to move.  I haven't noticed any pans contributing an off flavor, and I've used everything from really cheap springforms to heavy duty ones.

Some of the pans I have at home have that same type of lip.  But, since I use a crust, I can lift it up.  There are some pans, like the ones I'm using at my new job, that have a raised base inside the pan, and the sides clamp around it. Makes cutting and lifting slices (or the whole thing) very easy. 

post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

i have not seen a pan like that and i'm searching around to see what's out there.  Can you tell me who makes that pan or who the supplier.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

I don't know if my pan can work that way but I will check that out.  Be funny it that is what happened.  Thanks.

post #8 of 11

Actually really easy tip.  Take a piece of parchment paper that is bigger than the pan.  Prepare the pan as normal...whatever you normally do.  Assemble the pan with parchment paper in the middle.  So base, parchment paper, then sides.  The paper should stick out of the pan on the bottom.

 

After cake is baked and cooled...release sides and remove.  Then you can simply lift the cake off the bottom pan by using the ends of the parchment paper as handles.  Peel the paper back on one corner of the cake and as you lay it on your final plate peel the paper off.

post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

thanks.  I tried that with foil but not with parchment.  It makes it possible to move the cake off the pan but I had never tried to remove the foil liner fearing I would damage the cake.

 

I picked some pans from fat daddio that have removable bottoms like a tart pan.  So far they are working very well and no leaks in the water bath while the cake cooks.  I also use a parchment round in the pan which I can leave on the cake and not worry about removing it since it has a clean edge.  In theory I cake use one of the bottoms to hold the cake and feel away the parchment round.  Don't know that it is worth the risk of damaging the cake.

post #10 of 11

I've never found a good spring form pan. i've taken to baking my cheesecake in a 9" silicone cake pan. Spray the pan with cooking spray oil. Cut a piece of parchment paper to fit the bottom evenly. Spray again. Proceed as your recipe directs. This is particularly good for bain marie cooking as it will not leak as well.

 

Chill, run a knife around the pan edges. Invert onto a cutting board or baking sheet lined with plastic wrap. It will drop out easily. invert again onto your serving tray. Remove plastic wrap.

post #11 of 11

I bake cheesecakes for a restaurant here in Atlanta.  Hand to God, so far the best (reasonably priced) springform that I've ever had that gets TONS of use was from Publix.  Wrapped in a simple plastic wrapper, it looks very nondescript but I promise you, mine get lots of use.  I use 10" springforms and yes, after a couple of years I have lost one or two.  If you can handle the pan, look for a riveted model where the screws go through the pan (same principle as a riveted handle on a sauté pan).  If you find any, buy all you can get your hands on - they will last forever. 

 

I do not use the springform bottom that came with the pan.  I purchased a large amount of bakeable cake circles from a manufacturer and bake the cakes using those.  This is the manufacturer and I absolutely love the product. 

 

New Method Packaging

Food is sex for the stomach.
Reply
Food is sex for the stomach.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › removing cheesecake from the baking pan