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Inside Round seasoning, rub, or glaze ?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hey everyone

 

Doing some work on some recipes for a menu at my place of work. Was wondering if anybody could give me an idea of a good glaze, rub, or seasoning mixture to use for a roasted beef brisket which will be thinly sliced and used for a beef dip and beef jus ?

 

Despite my internet searches i havnt come across anything to helpful. Im just trying to find something that i can build from, something to give me the basis and appropriate depth of flavours i need so i can modify it accordingly to get what i want out of it, so basically just a place to start.

 

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated :)

 

Cheers

 

Stephen 

post #2 of 9

Welcome to Cheftalk Stephen,

 

Not sure if you are using this rub or not : 2 tsp pepper, 2 tsp dry mustard, 1 tsp garlic, 1 tsp rosemary, 1 tsp thyme, 1/2 ground allspice. ( I guess thats your standard rub ) you can build on these or add your own.

 

or you can use a orange/ginger marinade : gingerroot, crushed garlice, orange juice, rind, shallot, 1/4 cup teriyaki sauce , splash of chilli sauce.

 

There are many rubs and marinades out there......

 

Petals.

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Petals
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post #3 of 9

Point and/or flat?  How closely are you trimming the fat?  How much garlicky can you go?

 

A lot of people rub brisket with a mix of ketchup and dry onion soup, before covering and slow (relatively slow anyway) roasting.  It isn't what I'd do myself, but is something to think about if you're looking for fast and dirty. 

 

I favor whole briskets (point and flat), with a close trim, and almost inject -- but injection is another story, isn't it?  And FWIW, I usually smoke and not use the indoor oven. 

 

I start the rub process with a couple hours (or overnight) in a very little red wine and Worcestershire.  An hour or two before the cook, a mayo / Dijon slathe and a dry rub with something I call my "Basic Beef Rub."  If you were to call the rub "competitoin style" you wouldn't be far off.  Note also, that this rub is extremely good on steak. 

 

BASIC BEEF RUB

 

•    1/2 cup Diamond kosher salt
•    1/4 cup sweet paprika
•    3 tbs coarsely fresh ground black pepper
•    3 tbs paprika,
•    2 tbs mild chili powder, or 2 tbs ground chipotle chili, or 1 tbs chile de arbol or cayenne pepper
•    1 tbs granulated garlic
•    1 tbs granulated onion
•    2 tsp dry Colman’s or other hot mustard powder
•    1/2 tsp dried sage
•    1/2 tsp dried thyme

 

Combine, by mixing in a bowl with a fork, or by pulsing briefly in a spice grinder.  Lately, I've started using a grinder -- I find that the more uniform sizing you get seems to make for better "bark."   I wouldn't call this "spicy" in the sense of being very hot; but some people might.  If that's something you need to control, you might want to consider going with the mild chili powder or ground California chili instead of the other chilis; and also for not only omitting the dry mustard, but substituting yellow mustard for Dijon in the slather.

 

Hope you like,

BDL

 

Note:  As always...This recipe is original with me, and is posted on my Blog, CookFoodGood.  You have my permission to share it (the recipe not the blog) only on condition that you attribute it to me, Boar D. Laze. 

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post #4 of 9

You're going to use a brisket for French dip? Not the way I'd fly but if that's the direction you want to take I would keep it pretty simple and season with S&P, garlic and rosemary.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #5 of 9
I'm of generally a similar mind to BDL overall in what sort of rub I'd do, and his marinate and slather steps are good choices too.

So here's a rundown of a sort of general workhorse rub I use as a baseline, then tilt particular ingredients to match an ethnic flavor or particular cooking method. I'm targeting beef here generally.

I tend to salt the meat separately from the rub because I'm on a sodium restriction. This also lets me use the rub more thickly or thinly depending on my flavor goals, and not have to worry about getting too salty. Alternatively, you can let the rub marinate longer and have less concern about the salt drawing too much moisture.

1 part garlic powder--I usually start with the garlic and use that amount as my baseline amount for a part. My philosophy of rubs tends to center around balancing against a particular strong flavor.

2 parts onion powder--This 1:2 ratio between garlic and onion is one I've found pleasing. Most other rubs tend to be 1:1 which is good, but I find less balanced to my tastes.

2 parts paprika -- Shift this up or down depending on the amount of color you're looking for. These first three ingredients often clump and is another reason to use a grinder for mixing and breaking down whole spices fresh.

1/2-1 part ground chile--For mild heat, use ground Mew Mexico or California ground chile; medium use something like Guajillo; hot cayenne, or those others BDL noted are good too. I'm not a fan of chili powder for most rubs because the cumin in chili powder tends to strike me as the wrong accent too often.

1/2 -1 part ground black pepper--The larger the cut of meat, the more I tend to add.

1/2-1 part herbs--For beef in the general sense rather than a particular ethnic flavor profile, 1/3 thyme, 1/3 marjoram, 1/3 ground bay leaf. Beef, I tend to hit with herbs more strongly than I do pork or chicken. For even less herbal situations, I'll use an "italian herb" mix with a light hand just to give it some background but without anything distinct. I mix my own generally.

1 part mushroom powder--you have to make your own. Buy some dried mushrooms, I tend to use the dried Chinese type as they're economical, but adding a little porcini is nice too. I like to use a cheap coffee grinder for this process and other spice grinding. A food processor is OK too, but makes a coarser product. But when I cook beef, I tend to add mushroom powder to the rub. Also handy to mix into ground beef. I don't use this generally with pork or chicken unless I'm pairing them up in the meal with mushrooms.

1/2-1 part citrus-like flavors This arises in part from my sodium restriction, but I've been impressed with what it can do in a rub. Some ideas to use singly and together:

Ground coriander has a mildly citrusy tone I like and often pick for a gentle hint of citrus and also brings some warm tones to the rub without heat.

Ground sumac is one I reach for often. Besides a lemony flavor, it adds lots of soluble dark red color. This added color can be good and bad so think about what you want from the juices, fond and so on as that might not be compatible with using sumac

dried citrus peel. When I use citrus juice, I often use some of the zest too. If not, I'll thinly pare the fruit peel before use and let it dry on a plate on top of my fridge at home. When dry, I add them to a baggie or bottle in my freezer door. Then add a piece to my rubs for grinding. Lemon and orange peel are common, but lime and grapefruit are handy too of course.

Lemonade powder, sugar sweetened only as the sweeteners used in sugar free varieties tend not to be stable in cooking. You have to use this ingredient carefully as sugars easily scorch in rubs during searing of a roast or on the grill.

One last note on the citrus flavors, I have some citrus spice combinations described in this thread as well as a good Lemon Garlic Rosemary Salt

And bay leaf grinds poorly in my cheap coffee grinder. I find it best to break it up in my fingers quite a bit, then grind with some other whole spices in the rub like the pepper corns to keep them from floating on the air from the propeller

I've got a cheapo Mr. Coffee grinder that I use just for spices and blending rubs. I've come to favor a finely ground rub. I like the mouthfeel of the resulting surface better generally.
post #6 of 9
I have been thinking of a flavor in my mind for quite some time and trying to create a base rub unique to the world drawing on my southeast Texas experience.  I got the itch to experiment with flavors.  Here is an excellent outcome for you to try ~  It is pretty interesting.  I added Schezwan peppercorns and coriander and modified amounts.  I toasted the coriander in a black iron skillet.  I pulverized 1 cup of pink Himalayan sea salt, 1 cup of Tellicherry black peppercorns, 2 cups sucanat and  ½ cup coriander.  The paprika and onion were already a fine powder.  The garlic was granulated.  I did not pulverize the granulated garlic.  All of the ingredients are organic and the finest available.  Most come from Whole Foods or Central Market.  The coriander I used is whole fresh organic.  The paprika is organic Spanish sweet already pulverized to a fine powder.


After I combined all ingredients and mixed very well I could still distinguish the flavor of both the coriander and the Schezwan peppercorns.  Pretty remarkable really!  Very flavorful and distinct ~
 
 
 
 
 
4 C paprika  (sweet Spanish)
1 C onion powder
1 C garlic (granulated)
½ C coriander pulverized 
1 C salt (pink Himalayan pulverized)
1 C black peppercorns (Tellicherry organic pulverized)
½ C Schezwan peppercorns pulverized
2 C Sucanat (sugarcane crystals pulverized)

Edited by Garth Beaumont - 6/20/12 at 10:22am
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

hey everyone 

 

Thanks for all the suggestions so far all very great ideas to build with and work around ive combined all 5 ideas together to make something very unique that i look forward to trying out tomorrow when im back at the office again.

 

To answer the question from boar_d_laze its a point brisket, i was going to leave the fat cap on it use a rub give it a good sear on the char grill then using the rub or glaze which im going to put together combining all the great ideas so far and slow roast it so it doesnt dry out too much and clean the meat up after ive pulled it out of the oven. But ive read some pretty interesting things here so far and i will probably modify that method a bit. And any additional things that anyone would like to add regarding that technique would be appreciated.

 

Thanks again everyone for taking the time to provide these suggestions! All very great ideas

 

Stephen

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen Oliver View Post

 i was going to leave the fat cap on it use a rub give it a good sear on the char grill then using the rub or glaze which im going to put together combining all the great ideas so far and slow roast it so it doesnt dry out too much and clean the meat up after ive pulled it out of the oven.

 

You don't have to worry about brisket drying out as long as you don't over cook. None of the fat or at least not enough to make an appreciable difference is going to help your product stay moist. In a Pork butt yes, in a brisket no. Briskets are either packers or flats. If you use a packer with the point and don't trim the fat there's no need to over think your rub as you will just be cutting all of that seasoning off when you trim the fat after cooking.

 

Dave


Edited by DuckFat - 6/20/12 at 3:23am
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thats a very good, point ill probably take the fat off before i cook it then when you put it that way :P. 

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