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Lasagna al Forno

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I did a dinner party this weekend for a couple that insisted on Lasagna.
I told them that this was not the season for a baked pasta dish, suggested boiled noddle Napoleton-style preparation.
"NO! I want the Lasagna I had in Emilia-Romagna!"
"OK, You're the boss."

So here's what I did.

I made spinach pasta sheets, nice and thin.
Made a classic 3 hour Ragu Bolognese and a classic Besciamela (posted below).

Assembly:

Light layer of ragu on th bottom of the lasagna pan.
Cover with a layer of noodles, side to side - corner to corner.
Add another layer of ragu and a layer of besciamela and a nice grating of Parmigiano-Reggiano.
Repeated 4 times
Topped the last layer with the besciamela and another grating of Parmigiano-Reggiano
Baked for 40 minutes at 375 F until it was bubbling and the top was golden brown.
Let it rest for 15 minutes
Cut and serve.
Very successful but way out of season

Besciamela:

Ingredients:
  • 5 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg

Method

Heat milk in separate pan until just ready to boil.
In a medium saucepan, melt the butter.
Add flour and stir until smooth.
Cook over medium heat until light golden brown, about 4 to 6 minutes.
Add the milk to butter mixture 1 cup at a time, continuously whisking until it very smooth and brought to a boil.
Cook 8 minutes over medium heat
Remove from heat.
It should be a thicker than cream liquid
Season with salt and nutmeg and set aside to cool

__________________
Chuck Love

Edited by Clove48 - 6/26/12 at 7:06am
post #2 of 8

You didn't post your ragu recipe though :(

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Koukouvagia

 

Here's one of many versions of a "classic" Ragu Bolognese.

Please understand that there are as many "authentic" versions of this recipe as there are home cooks in Bologna.

Some will say "never any garlic", others will say "What! no chicken liver?" or "only tomato paste, never canned tomatoes"

 

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 2 medium onions, finely chopped
  • 3 stalks celery, finely chopped
  • 1 carrot, peeled and finely chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 1 pound veal shoulder, ground
  • 1 pound pork shoulder, ground
  • 1/2 pound beef chuck, , ground
  • 1/4 pound pancetta, ground
  • 1 (16-ounce) can whole peeled San Marzano (DOP) tomatoes, crushed by hand, with the juices
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 cups brown chicken stock
  • Salt and pepper to taste

 

Method:

In a 6 to 8-quart, heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat olive oil and butter over medium heat.

Add onion, celery, carrot and garlic and sweat over medium heat until vegetables are soft but not colored.

Add the veal, pork, beef and pancetta and stir into vegetables.

Raise the heat to High and brown, stirring to keep meat from sticking together.

This should take 15 to 20 minutes.

Add tomatoes with juice and simmer 15 minutes.

Add the milk and simmer until reduced to near nothing, about 10 minutes.

Add the wine and brown stock, bring to a boil, lower the heat and simmer over for 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Taste and season with salt and pepper to taste and remove from heat.

Sauce should be very dense and moist but not at all "soupy".

 

Yield: about 6 cups


Edited by Clove48 - 7/25/14 at 8:18am
post #4 of 8
Good stuff. That's pretty much how I do it, the ragu I make is a little different, but you explain that well, we don't need to go down that street.

I typically get about 14 layers in a 2" hotel pan and finish with a very vlight amount of shredded mozzarella on the top layer.

Nice try suggesting something more appropriate to the season, most clients don't really think about that.
A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
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A person who never made a mistake, never tried anything new.  - Al E
Guests, like fish, begin to smell after three days.  - Ben Franklin
Reply
post #5 of 8

Sounds very good to me

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #6 of 8

Clove,

 

I believe that you have an exemplary handle on Italian regional.

 

I would also like to try your Spinach home made pasta too ...

 

I am in agreement, it is a bit too hot for such a filling dish; however, I too love Lasagne.

 

Best regards.

Margaux

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

Here's a simple recipe for green pasta you can do at home

It uses frozen spinach so you can make it anytime of the year and dosn't loose much from the same recipe with fresh spinach.

 

Spinach Pasta Dough - basic home version

 

Ingredients

§  1 package (10 ounces) frozen spinach

§  4 Cups all-purpose flour

§  4 large eggs

§  1 Pinch of salt

Method

Completely defrost the spinach and dry thoroughly. This is a critical step, the dryer the spinach, the better the dough.

Finely chop the dry spinach or use a food processor to puree.

Put the eggs into a bowl and mix completely.

Add the spinach into the eggs and combine.

Add the salt to the flour and mix though

On a large surface or board, make a mound out of the flour and form a deep well in the center

Add the egg / spinach mixture to the well

Using a fork begin to pull small amounts of flour, from the inside of the well, into the egg mixture and mix into the eggs

Continue going around the well pulling in more flour and mixing

Push the outside of the well up and inward as needed to keep the mixture inside the well.

When a dough starts to form in the center start to hand-knead the wet mass, using some the remainder of the flour to dry out the dough

It will be sticky at first but it will dry out as you knead and incorporate more flour

When the extra flour mixture starts to show little dry flour bits, remove the dough ball and discard to unused flour.

Re-dust the board and lightly re-flour the ball and continue kneading, making sure to add flour until the dough is no longer sticky

After 10 minutes, or so, you will have a smooth dry dough ball

Wrap in plastic wrap and let rest for at least 30 minutes before rolling or shaping


Edited by Clove48 - 7/25/14 at 7:04pm
post #8 of 8
Clove
The member you have addressed is banned from the site! biggrin.gif
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