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To keep my cup cake moist

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Dear chefs. I just started my pastry shop. I need help to know how can I keep my cupcakes moist if I make them two days before selling or advice how to manage baking every day it is a busy place pastry is new I am in chocolate business this is one of my recipe

Cappuccino cupcakes with white chocolate icing:
Ingredients:
225 g flour
1.8 tsp baking powder
1 tsp cocoa powder
225 g butter
225 g caster sugar
4 eggs
3 tbsp instant coffee powder dissolved in 2 tbsp hot water
 White chocolate frosting:
115 g white chocolate
55 g butter
3 tbsp milk
175 g icing sugar.     Always add eggs in slow speed to the butter mixture 


Method:
Sift flour, baking powder and cocoa into a bowl   Beat sugar and butter till lite and fluffy       Add eggs  slowly to the batter and mix till all  combined  now add           Flour  milk and coffee mixture to the batter 
Bake in preheated oven over 170 for 15-20min
For topping add milk butter and chocolate over a pan of simmering water and stir until chocolhas melted.remove the pan from heat and add icing sugar.beat until smooth.addv over cup cakes and serve.


Add coffee and milk to chocolate icing when gnash is worm 
Test result
Everyone liked it
Method icci 
Beat butter on slow speed  add sugar slowly till 5 min  add egg one by one on v slow speed always fold flour never over mix. coffee and flour one by one   
post #2 of 13

You opened up your own pastry shop straight out of culinary school, without bothering to spend time learning the ins and outs of your craft from other professionals in a professional setting?

Is that an accurate synopsis?

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
I did my internship in Marriott hotel pastry shop for few months and I was in chocolate business since 8 years done many course on chocolate and internship also
post #4 of 13

Ah, Therein lies the rub.

"A few month internship in a hotel pastry department".

No matter how much chocolate experience you had, what made you think you were qualified to open up and run your own pastry/bake shop??

I don't know you.  I'm not saying that you're not talented or that you don't have potential - It's quite possible that you do.

BUT, you're on here asking the most basic of Bakery BUSINESS questions, and that raises serious doubts about your ability to sustain a successful business. At this point in your career.

 

Now, as far as your initial question goes...

I don't know.  I don't know why a cupcake, if stored properly, would dry out in a day...but, I'm not the one running a bakery.

Have you tried making the batter and refrigerating it?  Then baking it as needed??

 

Maybe you'll get lucky on here and someone who knows will give you a definitive answer...

Good luck. You need it.

post #5 of 13

If you want to keep your cupcakes moist after two days I recommend freezing them and leaving them to defrost overnight. After that a quick spruce in the microwave before putting them out usually softens them up nicely. Of course, make sure you have no frosting on them before freezing them as it does not taste as good as fresh frosting...

 

N.B you can freeze cupcakes without frosting for up to 20 days.Would not recommend any longer!
 

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Littledreamer View Post

If you want to keep your cupcakes moist after two days I recommend freezing them and leaving them to defrost overnight. After that a quick spruce in the microwave before putting them out usually softens them up nicely. Of course, make sure you have no frosting on them before freezing them as it does not taste as good as fresh frosting...

 

N.B you can freeze cupcakes without frosting for up to 20 days.Would not recommend any longer!
 

Freezing...microwaving....NOT recommended as standard practice in a professional setting.  

post #7 of 13

Really? Why not?
 

post #8 of 13

It is standard to freeze cakes and cupcakes. I promise, they will be no worse after a trip to the freezer (so as long as they are good going in :), and usually it improves their texture.
 

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Littledreamer View Post

It is standard to freeze cakes and cupcakes. I promise, they will be no worse after a trip to the freezer (so as long as they are good going in :), and usually it improves their texture.
 

You might want to start a discussion in the general forum http://www.cheftalk.com/f/20/pastries-and-baking-general

 

This is the pro pastry forum.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Littledreamer View Post

It is standard to freeze cakes and cupcakes. I promise, they will be no worse after a trip to the freezer (so as long as they are good going in :), and usually it improves their texture.
 

So, you're saying that as a bakery owner, you'd be proud to be selling previously frozen cupcakes that had been "spruced" up in the microwave?  Your customers wouldn't have any issues with that, if they knew it?

Keep in mind, you're not giving these away - people are paying good money for them.

 

I have a catering business and do all of my baking in-house.  I have cakes and some desserts in my freezer so I know that as long as they're wrapped properly, there's no loss of quality.  Some desserts and all of my cookies and breads have to be made fresh.  But in this case there's a huge difference between a caterer or restaurant and a BAKERY.  Can you imagine the honest answer when a customer asks "when were the cupcakes made", and the person behind the counter says, "3 weeks ago, but don't worry - they were frozen and we freshened them up in the microwave". 

post #11 of 13

I agree, it is  a red flag. When you see the word microwave for the public ....well....

 

For home and personal use , whatever works for you .

 

The OP posted in professional fora, by mistake.

 

The funny thing is , many chain stores bake and  package & freeze their baked goods and stock the shelves or have it brought in frozen. As far as bakeries go , fresh is as fresh as they can possibly make is the order of the day and I have no problem with that, in fact I encourage it.

 

Petals.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #12 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

 

The OP posted in professional fora, by mistake.

 

The OP is a professional, talking about his pastry shop, somewhere in Europe...

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
The funny thing is , many chain stores bake and  package & freeze their baked goods and stock the shelves or have it brought in frozen. As far as bakeries go , fresh is as fresh as they can possibly make is the order of the day and I have no problem with that, in fact I encourage it.

 

I agree - in business, it's about customer expectations.

post #13 of 13

try adding glucose to your recipe. or use a special type of butter, ones they use in croissants and danish pastries, though i cant remember what its called, but i believe its creamier, http://www.lechef.be/index.cfm?Content_ID=338870953 something like that.

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