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Professional advice. - Page 2

post #31 of 35

TRY HELLS  KITCHEN

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #32 of 35

WOW.   A lot of beginning members of our forum, those who have single digit post counts, are rarely if ever heard from again after comments/replies like yours, french dough.  I don't really think that is the most productive way to contribute here. Courtesy and compassion are are valuable tools. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #33 of 35

Lets keep it civil here, plase. If you find objection with what/how someone is posting here, flag the offending post and a moderator will take care of it.

Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #34 of 35

I have only read some of these replies, and the ones I have read don't seem to be giving you very good advice (I apologize if someone did leave some legitimate advice that I just didnt read).

 

Here's my advice coming from someone who was a culinary student, and like you in the beggining of my carreer was intimadated by high end restaurants.... I have since worked in several high end restaraunts as a line cook, was sous chef for upscale hotel for several years and am now Exec Chef and F&B Director of a conference center.

 

Go in suit pressed and dressed to impress. Have resume ready and ask to speak to the Chef, if he is not available ask to speak to any manager present. Explain to them your situation and express that you want to learn, I have always been more likely to hire someone with less experience if I can honestly believe that they want to learn and will put everything they have into it. Be prepared to have to settle for less pay and to be stuck on garde manger. But if you can get into a upscale place try to ask questions and watch as much as possible, everything one chef does will not be the same with another chef. This is another thing to keep in mind you will learn a lot of "right" ways to do things but seeing the "wrong" is just as important in your professional development, but if you see things you think are wrong keep your mouth shut because that's a quick way to get on the chef's bad side.

 

I hope this helps you a bit.... oh and make sure you go into restaurant between 2-4PM that's your best chance to actually have the opportunity to speak to someone.

post #35 of 35

As an Owner/Operator I can tell you for a fact that if you were to show up asking to work I would have seen that as ambitious. I would have made you cook something on the fly to test your skills and experience. You can tell allot about someone when watching them use knives. Those skills come with experience. Now if you come in right at lunch or dinner then I wouldn't give you the time of day. Always walk in between 3pm - 5pm or very early in the morning.

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