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Knife care

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey guys. I'm a home cook, hoping to becoming an apprentice cook by the end of the year, and start my culinary journey, I bought a set of Global knives online, because I found a 7 piece block set for $280 (Possibly a rip off, hoping not) about two months ago.

Recently my girlfriend, my son and I moved into a house living with friends, as we had no where permanent to stay. The people we are living with aren't bad cooks, but they have no idea how to respect knives. I came home yesterday after shopping, to seeing my Peeling, Paring and Utility knives sitting in the drying rack next to the sink. I asked our housemate how long they had been there, and she told me "I don't know, a few hours", so I checked my knives, and now they all have a few rust spots on the blade.

Is there anyway to get rid of these rust spots without damaging the blades? Or am I going to have to live with it?

post #2 of 6

Small spots are usually pretty easy to take off. Start by trying to get them off with the least abrasive things and move up. I will usually start by scrubbing rusted knives with a green scrub pad. If it's not doing the job, I add some baking soda. Bar Keeper's Friend or Comet also seem to do the job, but are a little more abrasive than baking soda. All of these will leave some fine scratching on the knife, but in my experience it is not very noticeable, and in some cases less noticeable than the original grind on the knife. I've heard of using a half potato with baking soda, which would probably be less abrasive than a scrubber, but haven't tried it myself.

 

Using an abrasive material such as sand paper may be a more extreme option, which would work, but if you haven't done this before and are not willing to risk more damage or uglying up your knives, then I wouldn't recommend this route.

 

There are also specific products marketed for this purpose, but I haven't used them, so I can't speak to whether it's worth it or not.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply. Think I'll just try scrub it off with my not so abrasive scrub brush, if that doesn't work, I'll move up a notch and try a little bit coarser, but I'll never use something like sand paper.

Thank you for the help. :)

post #4 of 6

Globals are made with an alloy which is 18% chromium and EXTREMELY stain and rust resistant which they call Cromova 18.  That kind of chromium content is basically in the same class as a dive knife, and I think it's incredible that Yoshikin (makers of Global) get the kind of strength out of it that they do.

 

I think the spots are more likely crud which was dissolved in the water and left on the knife when the water evaporated than corrosion.  Or, perhaps, the knives came in contact with iron or steel which actually was slightly rusty and there was some transference. 

 

The first thing I'd try is soaking in hot water than scrubbing with dish soap and a sponge, soft brush or a pad meant to clean non-stick.  You can tell, that I find it hard to believe that the blades are actually corroding. 

 

But if they are...

 

Flour is the mildest polish.  You can probably wipe out the spots by putting a bunch of flour on the knife and rubbing it in then scrubbing it off with a damp sponge.  If flour doesn't work, baking soda is very mild and should absolutely do the trick.  If you don't want to scratch your knives, use a sponge and not a Scotch-Brite.  If you don't care about mild scratching, just use a Scotch-Brite without any flour or baking soda.

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/14/12 at 12:52pm
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post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

I think the spots are more likely crud which was dissolved in the water and left on the knife when the water evaporated than corrosion.  Or, perhaps, the knives came in contact with iron or steel which actually was slightly rusty and there was some transference. 

 

The first thing I'd try is soaking in hot water than scrubbing with dish soap and a sponge, soft brush or a pad meant to clean non-stick.  You can tell, that I find it hard to believe that the blades are actually corroding. 

 

I forgot about this. BDL's probably right that they aren't really corroded. Your best bet is still to use the gentlest stuff you have first.
 

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

I just used my soft head scrubbing brush, and it came off perfectly, so it's all good for now. :)

 

Thanks guys.

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