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How to freeze a bernaise sauce? - Page 2

post #31 of 47

Never heard of or been to an "Outback" but after googling it - i'd agree with you.

 

I also agree with the 98% of customers not knowing...as for one of them asking about it becoming a 'dessert' i'll take them odds and then explain why we can't keep the sauce sitting around from service to service.

 

 

 

Quote:
I'd put the cold condiment on the hot steak and let it sit on the grill for a few seconds.

 

That is exactly what the OP and myself agree with... just some others seem to get all twisted up in the shorts about it....

 

Damn this might be the first time i've replied to a post and not had a disagreement....

 

You Sir Are Correct!

 

o7

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post #32 of 47

Was not the whole idea behind the OP's post about the line not being able to make a Bearnaise Sauce in the first place?

Wouldn't the simplest solution be to educate the line in how to prepare and hold the sauce?

post #33 of 47

i just keep thinking about hot crispy fish and chips without the tartar sauce....too sad really...

joey

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post #34 of 47

xo


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/23/12 at 4:33pm
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post #35 of 47

not to poke any sleeping bears here, and something i thought might be a bit humorous, coincidentally and accidentally since this thread started i have been reading of chefs making and restaurants serving....wait for it...'bernaise gelato'......steakhouses too!  interesting, don't you think?...or not

joey

 just to clarify though, the gelato was served on tenderloin carpaccio, not big hot juicy steaks


Edited by durangojo - 7/23/12 at 11:56am

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post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

not to poke any sleeping bears here, but coincidentally since this thread i have been reading of chefs making and restaurants serving....wait for it...'bernaise gelato'......steakhouses too!  interesting, don't you think?

joey

 

I think people are trying too hard.

 

This isn't bernaise ice cream, they can call it "Bernaise flavored Ice cream/gelato" but there's no butter in it.

 

 

Quote:

For the Béarnaise ice-cream

Heat 1.5 litres of cream. Infuse 100g of tarragon. Beat 8 egg yolks with 150g of sugar till it is fluffy and creamy. Mix the mixtures together and strain. Place back on the heat to slightly cook the eggs in the mixture. Cool, then place in an ice cream machine and churn according to the manufacturers’ instruction until frozen. This quantity is enough for quite a few portions.

 

post #37 of 47

Since when does Tarragon flavored ice cream equal Bearnaise??

post #38 of 47

yeah it isn't bearnaise ice cream at all but in the right situation it would be an interesting savoury course if they added red wine vinegar and shallots and folded in soft butter to the custard. i've seen lots of local newspaper articles  saying how the new fake irish pub in town is so awesome that they even have guinness ice cream .... crazy really. or the place with garlic sorbet; next thing you know someone will come up with a foie gras creme brulee. i actually do like the idea of bearnaise semi fredo though,  ..... if the steak is hot enough it will still be melting as it arrives at the table. that's one of the most interesting things i've heard in a while ....... still old school and fun as opposed to needing a BSC degree ,which is what it should be all about in the first place.

post #39 of 47
If the steak is hot enough [the Bearnasie semifreddo] will still be melting as it comes to the table

Think it through.  As the plate comes to the table, what's happening to the STEAK with frozen "semifreddo" on the middle of the top, the rest of the steak and  plate covered with barely melted "sauce?" 

 

In the few years I cooked professionally, I never had a guest send a steak back because it was too warm.  On the other hand...

 

Tell you what, dip a toe into it by grilling an 20oz, Prime, bone-in rib, and serve it on a chilled plate, with a chilled fork and a scoop of horseradish/green peppercorn ice cream.  Charge -- I don't know -- $35.  What could possibly go wrong?

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 7/23/12 at 4:47pm
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post #40 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chefross View Post

Was not the whole idea behind the OP's post about the line not being able to make a Bearnaise Sauce in the first place?
Wouldn't the simplest solution be to educate the line in how to prepare and hold the sauce?

I could not agree more.
post #41 of 47
To the OP:

Your question was to freezing bernaise and using for service. Like a few other people have stated it is not a good idea to freeze an emulusified sauce. I don't think it is a good idea to have the name "Bernaise" on your menu and use any of the recipe's above no matter how close in flavor or texture they may be. Keep true to your guests and give them exactly what the name and description of an item is.

In another statement you said your cooks have trouble making this sauce to order. Bernaise sauce would not be an item you want to make "a la minute". You would want them to make a fresh batch on a daily basis and even an hourly basis depending on how you want to hold this sauce complying with all health sanitation and procedures.

You do have some alternatives to have having and using bernaise sauce. There are hollandaise sauce bases out there that are stable at 140+ degree temps. They are easy to use, usually just adding water and poof! You now have a 30 second hollandaise. Just make a reduction with some tarragon ( that you can hold for a few days, so your not making everyday). With all easy sauce cheats like this a little tasting and seasoning will get you to a decent sauce that you can call "bernaise".

I hope this helps!!
post #42 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongHoursChef View Post

To the OP:
Your question was to freezing bernaise and using for service. Like a few other people have stated it is not a good idea to freeze an emulusified sauce. I don't think it is a good idea to have the name "Bernaise" on your menu and use any of the recipe's above no matter how close in flavor or texture they may be. Keep true to your guests and give them exactly what the name and description of an item is.
In another statement you said your cooks have trouble making this sauce to order. Bernaise sauce would not be an item you want to make "a la minute". You would want them to make a fresh batch on a daily basis and even an hourly basis depending on how you want to hold this sauce complying with all health sanitation and procedures.
You do have some alternatives to have having and using bernaise sauce. There are hollandaise sauce bases out there that are stable at 140+ degree temps. They are easy to use, usually just adding water and poof! You now have a 30 second hollandaise. Just make a reduction with some tarragon ( that you can hold for a few days, so your not making everyday). With all easy sauce cheats like this a little tasting and seasoning will get you to a decent sauce that you can call "bernaise".
I hope this helps!!

Sooo...you're against calling the above recipes Bernaise (because it wouldn't be a "real" Bernaise?) but are perfectly OK using packet hollandaise...filled with god knows what chemicals, stablilizers, artificial flavors, etc...and a little tarragon infused vinegar and calling that Bernaise? 

 

Lol, I think your version resembles "real" Bernaise less than a Bernaise semi-freddo would. 

 

Are we really still at the point where the only thing that can have the title "Bernaise" in it is a warm egg yolk emulsified butter sauce with a vinegar/wine tarragon reduction? Guys, its 2012. Two thousand and twelve. Chefs and cooks have been deconstructing, pulling apart, twisting and turning and god knows what else to food and traditional recipes for decades. Using a familiar flavor combination and serving it in a unique or unorthodox way is becoming more commonplace every year. And it HAS been becoming more common for a LONG time. 

 

Calling something a "bernaise gelato" familiarizes it to a lot of people instantly. Putting granitas/frozen custards on cold meat has been done a lot. This allows the chef to serve familiar flavors to people, and his food might be a touch more exciting to people who haven't experienced things like it before. Calling something a "tarragon frozen custard" holds no food memories for anyone, and allows no association for familiar flavors to take place. Again, if a chef can get a very similar flavor profile to his guests (hell, even a classic and played out one like Bernaise and beef) and make it exciting again, then more power to him/her. 

 

 

 

Quote:
yeah it isn't bearnaise ice cream at all but in the right situation it would be an interesting savoury course if they added red wine vinegar and shallots and folded in soft butter to the custard. i've seen lots of local newspaper articles  saying how the new fake irish pub in town is so awesome that they even have guinness ice cream .... crazy really. or the place with garlic sorbet; next thing you know someone will come up with a foie gras creme brulee. i actually do like the idea of bearnaise semi fredo though,  ..... if the steak is hot enough it will still be melting as it arrives at the table. that's one of the most interesting things i've heard in a while ....... still old school and fun as opposed to needing a BSC degree ,which is what it should be all about in the first place.

 

I'm curious as to how you can reconcile that a "bernaise ice cream" isn't appropriate but somehow a bernaise semi-fredo is? How is semi fredo "old school" and "fun" yet an ice cream isn't? They are practically the same thing....one is just has folded whipped cream in it and isn't run though an ice cream machine...? You think you would need a BSC degree to make an ice cream? I'm confused...

 

I dunno guys, to me it is a slippery slope. The greatest chefs in the world got where they are by, besides obviously having great technique, either doing something the world had never seen before in food (those people are super rare) or taking classic, familiar flavor and cutting them up, re-imagining, re-interpreting, etc all the stuff from chefs that came before them. I'm not saying that someone who puts a bernaise compoind butter on a steak is one of these chefs, I'm just saying that statements like "that shouldn't be called bernaise because it doesn't have butter/eggs/whatever" should probably not be spoken by chefs nowadays. 

 

Of course, all this must be done with discretion. When executed poorly, this type of thing runs the risk of alienating your diners as opposed to delighting them, but really, in the year 2012, there aren't many limits on what can/should be done with food. 

 

And by the way, I've had/made foie gras creme brulee, and it was f-n delicious. What's not to love about that idea? 

post #43 of 47

What is the classic presentation for Bearnaise?  Table served in a sauce boat or something like that right?  

post #44 of 47

i promise this is the last thing i have to say about this whole thing...if the op's kitchen staff can't even make a simple bearnaise, i doubt they would be able to manage making a semifreddo or gelato or whatever name du jour you choose to call it

joey

it would be nice if the op came back to clue us in on what style of restaurant it is...a steakhouse in bogota? is it a k-bob cousin or a high end place?......if it's a k-bob type there are frozen sauces(hollandaise), or powdered that would most probably work just fine...of course being a restaurant in bogota, i might be more afraid of the 'consequences' from the customer if they didn't like something!!!!!


Edited by durangojo - 7/24/12 at 9:25am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #45 of 47

Someday, sorry if my post was confusing. i do like the idea of bearnaise ice cream but i was basically agreeing with another poster that just because it had tarragon as an ingredient it didn't make it bearnaise ice cream, next time i have a chance i might make bearnaise ice cream but will add a reduction as well as tarragon. i was referring to bernaise semi fredo as still kind of old school since it used all natural ingredients and had a familiar flavour profile as opposed to molecular gastronomy which is why i mentioned the BSC. there's nothing wrong with foie gras creme brulee  or guinness ice cream or garlic sorbet, it's just that most people here have made them before and probably nobody has made bearnaise creme brulee ..... yet.

post #46 of 47
Quote:

just like some people do it with the flavorized butters

Diana,

 

I agree that it would be a good thing to train your cooks to make the sauce. If that does not appeal to you,  what about bearnaise butter ? Mix into a bowl, shape into a log, twist ends, chill till cold and slice off as needed.

You have had lots of feedback since you last  posted, any thoughts ?

 

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post #47 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Someday View Post

Sooo...you're against calling the above recipes Bernaise (because it wouldn't be a "real" Bernaise?) but are perfectly OK using packet hollandaise...filled with god knows what chemicals, stablilizers, artificial flavors, etc...and a little tarragon infused vinegar and calling that Bernaise? 

Lol, I think your version resembles "real" Bernaise less than a Bernaise semi-freddo would. 
Quote:

No one at this point had given this option. It seems like to OP is struggling a bit right now if they can't make this right imagine the other things that aren't getting done correctly. This is just a short term fix. They probably need to go through some training and try again at a later time.

If the package says hollandaise thats what its got to be right? I'm really not a big fan but these are stable sauces at and above 140. When your making sauces like this and you have people that might not be making them the right way under cooking raw eggs can be a serious issue. I work at a major hotel chain and it is our "corporate standard" to use (i believe its a minors product) a hollandaise base. If you have had breakfast in a hotel i can assure you, you have had this product.

I'm not saying this is the best "Culinary" option but it can be a safe quick change short term. I've watched people day after day not be able to figure this sauce out. Always scrambled, under cooked, etc... Sometimes i wouldn't even taste it.
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