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Mornay for Souffle

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

I'm wondering what ratios people are using in their cheese sauce when they make a souffle.

 

Specifically, do you mix your bechamel thin or thick and  how much cheese?

 

The basic bechamel (thin) usually lists runs about 1 T butter, 1 T flour to 1 Cup milk.

 

I notice I've been trending to 2 T butter, 2 T flour to 1 Cup milk as it can hold more cheese without breaking and I want a stronger cheese flavor in the finished souffle.

 

This comes at the expense of less rise from the whites though, so a little denser of a souffle. I've also gone to using a sharper cheese to punch up the cheese impact and not need quite so heavy of a mornay.

 

Tell me about your cheese souffles.

post #2 of 14

I use 40g butter to 1 cup of milk. I don't weigh the flour: I add as much flour as the butter will absorb. Different butters will absorb more or less flour. The better the quality of the butter, the more flour it will absorb - and the more roux it yields. 

 

From a quick googling around, 40g is approximately 2 T + 2/3 T. 

 

I like to use a fairly sharp Comté (not the stuff you find in supermarkets). 

 

I fill up the ramekin to about 1/2" below the top. After 5 mn in the oven I open the oven (I know, I know, you're not supposed to do that, but it works for me), insert a knife between the souffle and the ramekin and turn it around the souffle to free it up from the ramekin and allow it to rise. They about double in height by the time they come out of the oven: 

 

 

1000


Edited by French Fries - 7/23/12 at 2:49pm
post #3 of 14

Anyone else here making souffles?

post #4 of 14

Quite often, especially for dessert:

  • Chocolate souffle
  • Strawberry souffle
  • Mango souffle
  • Peach souffle

 

Oh, wait, you're talking about souffles using a roux base, correct? crazy.gif

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

Here's my last batch. A bit overcooked and not as much rise, (about 2 inches from the level I poured them to) which is why I made this thread.

 

700

post #6 of 14

Phatch, did you try my knife trick? It works for me. Even though I take great care of buttering and flouring the ramekins, it helps a lot. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

After 5 mn in the oven I open the oven (I know, I know, you're not supposed to do that, but it works for me), insert a knife between the souffle and the ramekin and turn it around the souffle to free it up from the ramekin and allow it to rise. They about double in height by the time they come out of the oven: 

 

I also usually put the ramekins at the bottom of the oven where the heat will come from the bottom and rise. It helps with the rising of the souffles. The convection is turned off. 

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 

I haven't made them again since I started this thread. I usually butter the ramekins and coat in grated parmesan cheese. It usually releases from the sides on it's own pretty well. 

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

I usually butter the ramekins and coat in grated parmesan cheese. It usually releases from the sides on it's own pretty well. 

 

Weird - I never tried cheese but I would have thought it would melt and become sticky...

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

It's a common recipe instruction.  Joy of Cooking, Pepin does it...

post #10 of 14

Yeah I've also heard of using cheese on the ramekin on TV-shows... never understood how that works as I picture the cheese melting and becoming sticky - never tried it though. I use flour, just like when I bake a cake, and it works for me. 

post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Same idea. It does get a bit crusty, but it's a GOOD crusty.

post #12 of 14

Yes I'm sure it creates a yummy parmesan crust all around your souffle! Sounds good actually. It's just surprising to me that it wouldn't melt and stick and hinder the rising of the souffle. Maybe we should try (either you or I, whoever makes souffles first next) to do a few souffles, two with flour, two with parmesan, then one of each gets knife freeing-up action after 5mn in the oven, the other one of each doesn't. 

 

That'd give us 4 different souffles, I'd be curious to see the differences in rise (if any). 

post #13 of 14

I make a parchment  paper ring around my soufflee cups so when they rise they do not overflow and they stand up real high and look really impressive. I fill them high.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #14 of 14

Another tip :

 

Run your finger around the inside edge of the dish creating a 'ravine' , this forces the sides of the souffle to rise straight up.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
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