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Roasting and cleaning red peppers

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

hi I work at a golf club here in ontario and one of my co-workers roasted some red peppers , when he cleaned them his pepper flesh was nice and bright red and clean Im .not sure what he did , When I roast the peppers the sous chef turns on the gas stove to high and tosses the peppers on. I believe they burn because when I clean them some of the flesh is dark. .Does it make a difference whether they are slow roasted or if they are roasted faster at a higher heat? .Is an oven better than  the open fire method ?

post #2 of 20

I have found that slow grilling is best - and pretty red flesh doesn't taste nearly as good as that which has been charred a bit - either way, don't forget to steam them after roasting to loosen the skin, just popping the hot peppers into a closed container for about 20 minutes should do (don't use the liquid released by the peppers, it is unpleasantly bitter), but if I want to make a chili paste (like for birria) I roast the soak the peppers in boiling water for 20 minutes - this insures the skins come off easily and leaches out the bitterness in the peppers as well.

post #3 of 20

I do mine under the broiler. That way you can do several at a time. You have to watch them and turn them. It's not that hard to get the skin to blacken and blister without actually blackening the flesh but I actually prefer the flavor of a little char. I just put them in a bowl and keep it covered until they're cool enough to handle. The skin steams and slips right off. I like to do jalapenos that way, too.

post #4 of 20

I do mine on the top shelf of the grill in nice weather and over the flame on my range the rest of the time.  The most important thing is to let them steam.  Many people think 5 minutes is enough - it's not and they struggle and waste product in the process.

 

If I were doing pounds at a time I'd just roast them in the oven but you still have to let them steam when done.  Personally I love the smell of them charring on the range top - smells like autumn.
 

post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keelenorth View Post

hi I work at a golf club here in ontario and one of my co-workers roasted some red peppers , when he cleaned them his pepper flesh was nice and bright red and clean Im .not sure what he did

 

Why don't you.....Ask him!

post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 

i did he said I had to learn it on my owm FYI he is a CCC Gold Seal

post #7 of 20

What a walking sack of vinegar that guy is.  If he's keeping his knowledge close to the vest instead of sharing it with eager up-and-comers, he ain't no chef.

 

My guess is that he's submerging them in the deep-fryer.  Easier to clean and look nice - I worked with a chef who used to do them like that on occasion -- but then they're something else - NOT roasted peppers.  Different flavor profile as well.

post #8 of 20
He is dropping them in the fryer if I had to bet on it.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #9 of 20

Yeah.  What he said.  What I said.

post #10 of 20

Chefhow is right he is deep frying which is no flavor way. I put directly on burner and blacken outside then put in covered container then peel and rinse with cold water. I have been in places where they blanch in boiling water first, remove skin then roast. That works also

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #11 of 20

I NEVER RINSE, I have always thought and believed that by rinsing you wash all that roasted flavor away.  I peel and pat dry to get any random stray bits of char off the pepper itself but NEVER rinse. 

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefDave11 View Post

What a walking sack of vinegar that guy is.  If he's keeping his knowledge close to the vest instead of sharing it with eager up-and-comers, he ain't no chef.

 

My guess is that he's submerging them in the deep-fryer.  Easier to clean and look nice - I worked with a chef who used to do them like that on occasion -- but then they're something else - NOT roasted peppers.  Different flavor profile as well.

 

I agree what a goof to withhold knowledge. This is a great life lesson for you though to understand how "NOT" to be.

 

Deep frying them is fine if you are doing volume for a banquet etc but I agree with Dave they are not "Roasted".

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 

would slow roasting at a lower temp get me the roasted flavor without charing the flesh? FYI the guy that is the chef  (not the same one that won't share info)   also doesn't like the peppers rinsed,Same reason he says it washes away the flavor .

post #14 of 20

Slow roasting on a sheet pan in the oven will give you one result.  Broiling in a hot oven on a sheet pan will give you another result.  Grilling over a rocket hot charcoal fire will yield yet a different product, as will laying them on the open flame of a gas range.

 

My favorite is over charcoal, but I often do the gas burner thing because of convenience.  As a home cook I am usually doing only 1 or 2 at a time.  Whatever the method, 15 -20 minutes of cool down steaming in a closed container is a big help.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keelenorth View Post

would slow roasting at a lower temp get me the roasted flavor without charing the flesh?

I doubt it.  A lower temp won't roast the peppers.  Cook, yes.  But give it the roasted flavor we expect from roasted peppers, no way - you might as well deep-fry them.

post #16 of 20

I just blacken on top of gas stove.  Then park in a paper bag till cool enough to handle.  Have found that if I rub between a few layers of paper towels, pretty much all of the black comes off and no need to rinse.

post #17 of 20

lmao

post #18 of 20

Agreeing with the stove top burner for domestic use....no rinsing please!!!!   May as well just fry them... a few minutes under cling wrap will peel those li'l suckers, I reckon they are better with a bit of black on them....yum yum

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #19 of 20

I roast mine in the oven at 425 for 15 to 20 minutes, turning twice. I've never bothered steaming them after as it's never been necessary. If they are roasted the right amount of time, the skin comes right off when they're cool. I also pull the stem out right when they leave the oven so they cool faster. It pulls most the seeds out too. If I was doing a whole mess of them for a party, I'd steam them after roasting because it would be a lot harder to judge when each of them is perfectly roasted.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

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post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ok after much nudging he fessed up ! what he does is plunge the roasted peppers into ice water to stop the cooking and keep them red

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