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Wonton as ravioli.. improvised

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

So I've used the wonton skin trick to make ravioli before.. and I've recommended that many times for people that don't care to make fresh pasta. I started thinking about it and really the only complaint I had with using wonton skins as fresh pasta, is that at al dente they are a little too thick.

 

So began my experiment... using my kitchenaid pasta roller... with varying widths... I started moving a wonton sheet through the roller. It was already coated with what I think is corn starch.. I had no issue.. didn't need to add flour.

 

Here's what I ended up with after 2 runs..

1000

post #2 of 20

Very good idea. You can also buy frozen pasta sheets, which I have used and are pretty good.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #3 of 20

That's an idea to try, thanks. The reverse: cooking Chinese wonton or guotie with Italian pasta, doesn't work the same. Tried and despised.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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post #4 of 20

eastshores shows a really cool finished product of a good suggestion.  I've done that too.  If you want to go off the reservation and into the "super-cool" world, try this.  Sandwich leaves of basil, thyme and rosemary *  between two(2) won-tons before rolling them through the pasta roller.  It comes out looking really cool. 

 

* you can use any herbage you want, I just like basil, thyme and rosemary

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

eastshores shows a really cool finished product of a good suggestion.  I've done that too.  If you want to go off the reservation and into the "super-cool" world, try this.  Sandwich leaves of basil, thyme and rosemary *  between two(2) won-tons before rolling them through the pasta roller.  It comes out looking really cool. 

 

* you can use any herbage you want, I just like basil, thyme and rosemary


That's an awesome idea! I'll definitely give that a shot. I can imagine mixing baby spinach and basil leaves.. I'd go with a simple ricotta filling and just olive oil and garlic to let the herbs take the spotlight.. ok my mouth is watering now!

post #6 of 20

I've done it with parsley before in Tagliatelle. That's good. I saw Weir do it on her cooking show once. I liked the idea enough to try it myself.

 

Rosemary though? That's too thick and would break through wouldn't it?  Or does the pasta roller crush it down enough.

post #7 of 20

All different parts of what you just asked/said. LOL. I generally smash stuff flat first, you know, to start things along, plus the roller does a nice job too, plus I don't mind it coming out a little bit thicker than maybe you would. All it's gotta be for me is thin enough to get some visualization of the herbs. After that, you might be surprised at just how tough a won-ton wrapper is. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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post #8 of 20

Slice of truffel also works well, aqs does a real thin slice of mushroom.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

Ok.. I need some help here! I did everything as planned.. and even got a new nifty ravioli cutter/sealer today that I ordered off amazon. Tonight the culmination of my work and my new toy was executed at my buddies house.

 

DISASTER... absolute disaster. I've never worked so hard for an idea only to have it turn into complete garbage. My ravioli turned into a gloppy sticky nasty mess. My mind is racing but I think my mistake was boiling them before tossing them in a sauce.. they are so thin that I guess they would be best just cooked to order via saute. I was absolutely humbled tonight. I need the guidance of you guys.. I don't have anywhere near the experience some of you have.. let me know where I went wrong frown.gif

 

Here's what they looked liked.. that stupid tool wouldn't seal them as thin as they were.. my buddy took it apart and removed the cutter.. then at least we could use it to seal em. A fork works just about as well and is more reliable!

 

1000

post #10 of 20

ugh...if you are going to go through the trouble of getting out the pasta machine and rolling pasta, why not just make fresh pasta? It literally takes just a few minutes. I understand just using wontons if you aren't going to roll and want to be quick, but come on....the rolling of the pasta is the most labor intensive part of making fresh pasta, and ytou are already doing that. 

post #11 of 20

Did you use egg wash or water to keep the sheets together? I would let the ravioli dry a bit after you seal it then you can cut it easier. It is also possible that the pasta cutter is not the right tool. Wonton wrappers are not the same as pasta they are a much firmer texture then fresh made pasta so not as easy to cut.Don't get frustrated just keep perfecting the technique till you get it.

Thanks,

Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
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post #12 of 20

Dough is slightly different then pasta dough  so egg wash and seal edges with prongs of a dinner fork. Better then boiling because so fragile, poach in a shallow pan.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #13 of 20

I guess you should come up with a new wrap for those ravioli. Wraping technique is a basic for pasta cooking, be it  Italian or Chinese.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice guys. I did use an egg wash to seal the edges. Everything seemed perfect up until I actually cooked them, then they just got really slimy.. I don't really understand it yet because I never have had that problem in the past when I used them as they come from the store. I will give it another shot soon. I didn't think I could do something so basic wrong but the results speak for themselves. I wont get frustrated.. I know it's going to work out in the long run to be something really good!

post #15 of 20

Before cooking how long before were they made, and were they put in fridge a while before cooking?? If the skins sat on bench or table and got soggy from the liquid in the filling, they will fall apart in most cases.Same as eggrolls

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

They did sit.. for the time it took me to make them and some got soggy enough that they started to stick together. I was laying them on a plate on top of one another. The filling wasn't particularly wet, but now that you mention it, it definitely added some moisture to the skins. Enough that I had to throw a couple away because they stuck together and broke when I tried to pull them apart.

post #17 of 20

Eastshores  There is your answer.  Next time as you make put in cooler and keep cold . Try it,  you should not have any problems.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #18 of 20

Those would be good deep fried.  Get a pastry drying rack - they're cheap and let your ravioli dry before putting into liquid.  They would be good cooked in a brodo, or just sauteed in a pan with some bacon drippings.
 

post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the inputs. I think to sum things up I did a couple things wrong.

 

  1. I didn't keep the ravioli separate and dry (should have lightly dusted in flour and kept them on a sheet in the fridge until all were ready.
  2. I should never have boiled them first.. due to the fact that I rolled them so thin, which was an objective of mine, there was no reason to par cook them. I believe sauteed would be best, in something like olive oil and garlic or pesto. Possibly just cooked for 3-5 minutes in a sauce that is up to temp.
  3. It is possible I went to far and they were too thin, time will tell on this one.

 

I'll update everyone when I attempt this again!

post #20 of 20

   Hi Eastshores!

 

   What's the goal of trying ravioli this way?

 

  Are you looking for something crisp, flaky...unlike boiled pasta dough?  Or are you just trying to find a way to do something new? 

 

   If you describe what your vision is, it may help you get there faster.

 

   Have fun!

Dan

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