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Milk POW!-der

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

 

I have been encountering a number of recipes that use milk powder as of late. I work in a vegan restaurant and have been trying to adapt these recipes. Just wondering what role it plays in pastry.

 

To shed some light on the recipes I am making different crumbs (I read it acts as a binder in this case) and frozen chocolate "rocks" (no clue what role it plays here).

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 6
Thread Starter 

It is also worth noting that the chef uses natural additives such as xanthan and agar as binders as well if the purpose of the milk powder is a binder.
 

post #3 of 6

Milk powder promotes quicker and more even browning than liquid milk and reduces bubbling in cakes.

 

Soy milk powder is available.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Excellent. Thank you.
 

post #5 of 6

In baking I like it cause I just blend it in with dry ingredients. It also gives a more uniform golden color. It is used in frankfurters as a sought of binder, it is also one of the things that make them swell up.(Ball Park) but it was not meant for that purpose in baking.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #6 of 6

In milk crumbs it acts as a drying and flavoring agent. THere is not enough liquid in many of the recipes for the powder to dissolve. You can make a similar crumb by using cornstarch and cake flour for the milk or playing with the ration of sugar, brown sugar and flour to fat.  In Tosi's book "momofoku milk bar" there is a recipe for milk crumbs that uses an equal part flour and dry milk as the base but after playing with it a bit I actually liked the "vanilla crumb" we made by taking the cocoa out of her chocolate crumb and substituting cake flour.

 

In baking where the liquid ratios in a recipe are much higher ( bread and cake) the milk powder dissolves into the liquid.  It has a duel purpose of making the finished product have a softer crumb as well as helping with browning.   You can substitute soy milk for the liquid and leave out the powdered milk in a loaf of bread for a milk allergy or use water and leave the milk powder out altogether but the product will be very pale and pasty looking when it is cooked.  I have had some sucess making cakes where I figure that whole milk has 4% fat content so I sub water that is mixed with 4% melted stick margarine.  For example: if the recipe calls for 32 oz whole milk I sub in 1.25 oz melted margarine and 30.75 oz water. It is worth mentioning again that the cake was super pale when it was baked.

 

I have never tried soy milk powder so  I can't offer any opinions one way or the other on using it.

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