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What helps to keeps a sorbet together please?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Every year I make a cold tomato soup starter & serve it with a basil sorbet in the centre. 4yrs ago I thought I'd cracked it & made what seemed the perfect sorbet... It held together perfectly & although perfectly soft, it didn't melt too quickly.

However my boss later informed me it was too sweet crying.gif  


Sadly I never kept a note of what I'd used, although I know I'd tried adding liquid gloucose ... I'm guessing this is what held it together so nicely? But I'm also guessing this is where the added sweetness came from?
 

I have tried every year since & although I get the taste I'm looking for, the consistency is all wrong & I get a basil ice or crumbly snow... I need it to hold together/ball with an ice-cream scoop & not turn to snow/crumble.

 

Please can you help me with a basil sorbet recipe or the knowledge of what holds a sorbet together while keeping sweetness to a minimum?

 

I'm not professionally trained (at all) & work as a cook/housekeeper on a private country estate cooking for the British aristocrats.

 

 

p.s. I don't have an ice-cream machine if that makes a difference..

post #2 of 8
Thread Starter 

Another thought.... I do have an iSi cream whipper... Maybe a basil foam is the way to go??

 

The end result I'm looking for is a smooth, not too sweet basil centre for my bowl of soup that will hold throughout the course (about 30 minutes).

post #3 of 8

Basically, it's fruit fiber that holds a sorbet together.  Sugar is to keep it from getting too hard.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 8

An ice cream machine would be a good tool to have in any kitchen.

If there is a KA brand mixer (in your kitchen) a good idea would be to buy the ice cream attachment.

I use mine occasionally and altho it is not the best, it is affordable and meets my needs (2-3 x per year)

Another idea would be to practice your recipe a few times.

If you get consistently poor results, a new recipe would be my next step.

post #5 of 8

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=rival+ice+cream+maker&hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&prmd=imvnse&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&biw=1098&bih=622&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=953069716999536084&sa=X&ei=XpMeUOSTA8ny0gH7yoGoCA&ved=0CKEBEPMCMAQ#ps-sellers

 

Rival brand Ice Cream maker is about $30 US. Very reasonable and works well.

The addition of some alcohol will also serve to keep the sorbet from getting too hard, as well as reinforce or complement the flavor.

post #6 of 8

hay sally,

just curious...how did/do you make your basil sorbet? what did you start with...a simple syrup? was it more of an ice than a sorbet? did it have cream in it?  sherbet, sorbet, granitas and ices get interchanged and confused for such a simple little thing

funnily, yesterday i made(experimented) with making a fruit sorbet, but mine was with summer melons, mango, chili,and vanilla vodka. i can only tell you what i did and what worked for me. i don't have an ice cream freezer, so after straining the melons, i proccessed them, strained again, added mango chili sauce and vanilla vodka and froze in a hotel pan. originally i was going for a granita so after an hour or so, i forked, then forked again after a few hours more...to make a long story longer, i changed my mind for whatever reason, so i 3/4 thawed the pan, then whisked with more vanilla vodka....put it all back in the FP, added some lavendar and just the tiniest bit of cream to take out the translucency of the melons, put into bowls and froze......it was then totally scoopable and smooth.  i think because i whisked/processed it the second time, it was much smoother and the alcohol helped it not to crystalize and also to 'round' it out. 

did you try rewhipping your sorbet? basically by rewhipping, you are doing the same thing an ice cream maker is, right? adding air.....did you try adding alcohol? abosute peppar would be interesting i think, and of course the easy breezy way is to buy lemon sorbet, add fresh basil to it, and refreeze it.....but that would be cheating!!!  do hope this helps in some way

joey


Edited by durangojo - 8/5/12 at 9:22am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #7 of 8

Put simply: 

 

Cold keeps a sorbet together. 

 

Sorbets are mostly water.  Water freezes.  A sorbet won't come together until it freezes; and when a sorbet gets too warm it won't keep together. 

 

BDL

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What were we talking about?
 
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post #8 of 8

What what WHAT?!  Warmth melts ice, sorbet and other frozen things??

 

Reading the OP's post, it's obvious the issue she's referring to is regarding emulsification - or lack thereof.

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