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hotdogs

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 

can anyone help me how to make hotdogs?thanks

post #2 of 39

What problems are you having?

Ask about specific issues and you're more likely to be helped.

post #3 of 39

Do you mean manufactoring hot dogs?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #4 of 39

Or do you mean how to make them disappear  ?

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

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Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply
post #5 of 39
Thread Starter 

yeah manufactoring? how it is made? ingridients?why it is color red?im planning to make commercial hotdogs for business,my planned  business is all about home made process foods, thanks for reply 

post #6 of 39

Do you want natural casing or other. Do you have access to sodium nitrite and nitrates?

 

I would suggest making sausage it's a lot easier.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #7 of 39

The red color is usually from "cure," but sometimes it's food coloring as well.

 

A typical hot dog recipe is ground pork, spices (like garlic), "cure," salt, smoke flavoring, and extra pork fat.  Occasionally a filler like (fine) bread crumbs is added as well. 

 

In order to get the smooth texture, the meat, spices and filler -- if using -- are mixed, then pureed or ground very fine.    It's easier to make hot dogs by stuffing the meat into appropriate casings than to make "skinless."

 

Hope this helps,

BDL

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What were we talking about?
 
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post #8 of 39

The famous Chicago style dogs are usually beef. Vienna Beef is the hometown favorite. Not sure why, since they're not Kosher and we were historically "hog butcher to the world."

post #9 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaypee357 View Post

yeah manufactoring? how it is made? ingridients?why it is color red?im planning to make commercial hotdogs for business,my planned  business is all about home made process foods, thanks for reply 

 

 

  Hello Jaypee357!

 

 

   So you are planning a business and have no idea what ingredients are in the product or how the product is made?

 

   I would suggest refining your business to include the items you already know about.

 

  Good Luck!

 Dan

post #10 of 39

*** INCOMING!!!     Tangent!

 

1000

 

 

History of the Chicago Hot Dog

The "Chicago Style" hot dog got its start from street cart hot dog vendors during the hard times of the Great Depression. Money was scarce, but business was booming for these entrepreneurs who offered a delicious hot meal on a bun for only a nickel. The famous Chicago Style Hot Dog was born! They'd start with a Vienna Beef hot dog, nestle it in a steamed poppyseed bun and cover it with a wonderful combination of toppings: yellow mustard, bright green relish, fresh chopped onions, juicy red tomato wedges, a kosher-style pickle spear, a couple of spicy sport peppers and finally, a dash of celery salt. This unique hot dog creation with a "salad on top" and its memorable interplay of hot and cold, crisp and soft, sharp and smooth, became America's original fast food and a true Chicago institution.

1000

 

 

Nothing else is even close ... anywhere. 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #11 of 39

Home made yet Commercial Products ? 

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #12 of 39

All hotdog service is ethnic and based on where you are as in somecases are hamburgers and other things . Typical example Subway chain is now pushing Pastrami  but with lettuce, tomato. peppers and you name it.. In New York this would be a sacralige and would not be ordered by a real New Yorker., as would a burger with mayo on it . Down south here it's mayo on everything even hot corned beef. Gross

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #13 of 39

Chef Ed, Buonasera, Good Evening,

 

A Manhattan Hot Dog Vendor on the streets of old NYC,  offers their hot dogs,  with stewed onions, sauerkraut & German style yellow mustard or all of these ...

 

Never Mayo and never Dijon ...  And if I recall, they are also 100% Beef Hot Dogs, not pork.

 

Kind regards and thanks so much for the photo of the little bundle of divinity.

 

Margi.

Ciao.

post #14 of 39

I don't know, I could be wrong*, but all-beef hot-dogs just taste better than any other type. 

 

1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* NO, not by any chance am I wrong, I'm just stating this for the PC value of it here.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #15 of 39

Iceman, Buonasera,

 

Hope you are having a wonderful summer.

 

Yes, I believe the NYC frankfurters sold on the streets of Manhattan were 100% Beef. It is quite a number of years since I lived there.

 

However, maybe some native New Yorkers, could confirm.

 

I agree with you ...

 

Always a pleasure to have you online,

Ciao. Margaux.

post #16 of 39

When I lived there we called them Dirty Water Hot Dogs and the brand was Sabbrett and they were good with a Gabila Kinish from another vendor cart. Dogs when I was young .25  knish .15  Hell of a lunch with a soda for .50. Those days are gone now its about $3.50

 

stewed onion, kraut and deli mustard was New York style

 

I like Kosher franks all beef and garlicky  Hebrew Nat or Shoffar brand

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #17 of 39

I grew up eating coarse ground all beef hotdogs. Loved the texture over the fine ground dogs.

post #18 of 39

 

Awful mix indeed.

Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
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Gebbe Got uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichen und schönen Tod. Joseph Roth.
Reply
post #19 of 39

   It's good to also remember that there is nothing lucky about a "Lucky Dog"

 

  Sign me up for being a fan of all beef Hotdogs!

 

Dan

post #20 of 39

Dan Gone Fishin´...

 

There is quite a big difference between a 100% beef hot dog and a pork or pork mixed variety frankfurter ...

 

What are ur toppings Dan ?

 

Good to see you online,

Margaux.

post #21 of 39

Here, the best local large maker is Farmer John, their best hot dogs are the skinless 10" Dodger Dogs (not all beef), and their Louisiana Hot Links (no beef).  Their regular length dogs whether beef or pork/chicken are quite good too, and very smokey (liquid smoke).

 

IMO, the best, smaller batch hot dogs in SoCal are the ones sold loose in Armenian/Russian meat markets and supers.  Those are either pork or pork and veal, heavily spiced with garlic, and stuffed into a casing with plenty of snap. 

 

I generally prefer a dog with a casing to skinless. 

 

The really good stands serve Vienna, Wilno, Hoffy, etc., dogs... all made out of town; or else make their own. 

 

I really love the street dogs I get in Chi, NY, and so on; but they're not better than the good street dogs here; and the same for dogs from stands.  That said, it's easier to find a good cart or stand in some places than SoCal. 

 

The Slaw Dogs, which is excellent but too expensive, just opened a few blocks away from us.  Their "ordinary" dogs are Vienna, their homemade dogs are good aslo.   I especially like their "ghost pepper hot link" either as the wurst in a Chi style dog or with sauerkraut and onions.  Their chili is a little loose for the chili dogs to be awesome. 

 

There are some great chili dogs in LA.  You all probably know about Pink's, but since Pink's rearranged the way you line up, the wait is barely worth it.  Too bad, I love me some Pink's.  Pink's dogs are all beef and custom made for them by Hoffy. 

 

I like Tommy's chili dogs as much as Pink's once I get them to cut the tomato in half and keep the cheese off it, but Tommy's doesn't have the variety.  I don't know where Tommy's gets their dogs, but they seem to be all beef. 

 

There are some other places with great chili dogs too.  If anyone wants to talk LA chili dogs -- or even meet up -- I'm your man. 

 

The "true" LA street dog is a Dodge Dog wrapped in bacon, cooked ala plancha, and garnished with (among other things) mayo.  If you take yours someplace quiet, you can hear your arteries snapping shut as you eat.  You don't even have to speak Spanish to get one anymore.

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #22 of 39

Take a look at Otto's Sausage Kitchen in Portland, Oregon, they make their own sausage and hot dogs. look for the video from Otto's Dines drive ins and dives , it shows the hot dog making process. I will be traveling through Portland next week and stopping at Otto's for a hot dog and a sausage, then come back home with a cooler full of dogs and sausage. I'm not on the band wagon of all BEEF being a must, I am on the band wagon that the meat is good quality, therefore what's wrong with PORK. I think pork is getting a bad wrap, ok, call me a pig, we raise our own pork.

 

IceMan come up to the PNW and we will show you how Pork is good in dogs too.

700

 

 

.

post #23 of 39

OK. You know what ChefBillyB ... I've got NO problemmo with what you have said ... from your point of reference.   From where I stand, in Chicagoland ... I don't have the same view.  It is what it is.  We see what we see from what is available.  You would think that to be so much different, Chicago being "the hog-butcher for the world" and all, but the times they have done a-changin.   I thank you for, and accept your offer though.  If and when I ever get a chance to go places, meeting up with you will be on the list.   I got a lotta people to meet on that trip too.  LOL @ Me, once again.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #24 of 39

ChefBillyB   They have not figured out a way to make Kosher franks with pork yet, when they do I will be first on line for one.  I do know that ground beef will hold more water.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #25 of 39

 

006.jpg


Edited by ChefBillyB - 8/9/12 at 8:23am
post #26 of 39

Hebrew National claim to be 100% Kosher beef.   I don't know how that all floats with those of you that roll Kosher, but I know it's on the package.   Now just speaking from the point of a regular hot-dog eating fat-guy, I think HN's are one of the best hot-dogs out there.   I've got no problemmo swapping them for Vienna hot-dogs if they are on sale.    

 

 

***  That is a great pic. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

I don't know, I could be wrong*, but all-beef hot-dogs just taste better than any other type. 

 

1000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* NO, not by any chance am I wrong, I'm just stating this for the PC value of it here.

 MegFood

 

Iceman, the difference between my picture and your picture is, mine would have got you $3 for every Vienna beef hot dog you ate from 2004 to 2008..............your right Hebrew National, Vienna beef hot dogs, Sabretts, and many many more are all good hot dogs. I bet 99% of the people buying hot dogs want 100% all beef dogs. Most of the Pork and beef dogs I see are lower cost hot dogs sold in large packs for a cheap price. You live in a city with great food, Italian beef sand, Chicago style hot dogs, Chicago deep dish Pizza, and so on. I hope, in the future for all you foodies in Chicago, the Food truck scene will be approved and you guys will go crazy. ..............be good my friend.................ChefBillyB

post #28 of 39

Iceman

Trust me HN is Strickly Kosher, before it was sold to Conagra I knew the owner and his sons well. They wre in Long Island City then the whole operation moved out west. Conagra is to big to fool around with saying its kosher and its not.. There are rabbis on the premis at all times just like in Long Island. The only other Hot Dog that is like HN is a brand called National  out of Miami Fl. The reason being George Bell the guy who was in charge of the plant in LI moved their and litterally and took and used same formula which believe it or not the original owners never patented or registered

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #29 of 39

YO!

What happened to the OP?

Growing up in Hawaii it was Redondo Winners, no not weiners, it's winners!

 

700

 

 

Chili frank with two scoops rice and one mac salad.

I had no idea there other, better tasting Hot Dogs until I met DH!!

At the Vet in Philly, a dog and a beer!

 

@ BillyB, I love your girls Mu'u Mu'u and slippah!!! Just an Island gal, like Auntie!

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #30 of 39

LOL!

This really got me thinkin', so I did a google search

 

 

700

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
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