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Proper chicken handling and preparing

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Howdy,

My stepson has returned from college with a taste for cooking, specifically chicken and while watching him prepare his dinner the other night, I observed him handling raw chicken and then about to put that soiled hand into a bag of chopped salad!

 

I jumped up and demanded he freeze and wash his hands first. He complied with some hesitation and a few grumblings under his breath. His mother, who was sitting with me at the island, told me to be quiet.

 

Soon afterward, I saw him rinse the chef knife he was using (yes, rinse, no soap) and attempt to put it back into the knife block! Again, I intervened and again I received some words from my wife about keeping out of things.

 

If this is what he does here, at home, I shutter to think what goes on up in Buffalo when he and his roommates take turns cooking in their house they all share... I bet their bathroom gets a lot of use!

 

I've tried to explain that I have cutting boards specifically for chicken and the need to wash regularily inbetween cutting and preparing but it has been met with 'stop picking on him' rather than 'thanks for the advise'.

 

How can I impress the need for strict segregation between chicken and other foods so that he and his mom understand that it's not 'picking-on' and more of a concern for his health and anyone else that has the misfortune of dinning at their abode?

 

I certainly do not want to deter him from cooking, just want him to enjoy what he makes and be sure that it's safe and no one gets sick.

 

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #2 of 14

Could be you lost his attention when you demanded that he "freeze and wash his hands" lol.gif Man that would be painful!!!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 14

Go on line and dowload some poisoning cases involving poultry. Then since you are in Queens (my old stomping grounds) visit the NYC health dept website. If he or the Mrs does not believe or adhear to your request then lock the fridge.   Aquaint him with clorox for knife. or dip in boiling H2O.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

Could be you lost his attention when you demanded that he "freeze and wash his hands" lol.gif Man that would be painful!!!

well, I wasn't exactly like "FREEZE, DROP THE GUN..." It was more like " Whoa, please don't do that because...."

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #5 of 14

Hmmm..how to deal with a young guy who "knows everything".  Hard age.  It's taken me a long time to go from thinking I know everything to actually knowing everything! peace.gif

 

Chefedb had some excellent suggestions.

Having him comprehend and understand that you're not telling him your opinions on food safety, but rather trying to teach him about the concept of cross-contamination and what the dangers and effects of it could very likely be.  Maybe searching online for videos on it, finding one you like and watching it together with him could be helpful.  Good luck!

post #6 of 14

In short... YOU were right, redvan, and THEY should listen to you.

post #7 of 14

Go to an online store that sells science supplies and get a petri card, you add a little distilled water then swab the chicken, swab the card, then set in inside a baggie to grow. Trust me he will change his mind!

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

Go to an online store that sells science supplies and get a petri card, you add a little distilled water then swab the chicken, swab the card, then set in inside a baggie to grow. Trust me he will change his mind!


Swab about anything and you will be amazed at what grows

You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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You can't lay on the beach and drink rum all day unless you start in the morning

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post #9 of 14
Invite him to your kitchen to cook with you. You do the chicken and he would do his fav veg recipe. Now you are collaborating. Explain as you prep and cook what you've learnedabout proper meat & fowl handling.
post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

deltadude,

Yeah, I hear you and I tried that very approach Tuesday night when I was dismembering a whole chicken in preparation for grilling. I asked him if he wanted to observe but he couldn't be bothered, the Yankees were on I think.

 

Unfortunately, my criticism earlier has turned into a state of mind, along with 'mommy dearest' undermining of my cooking skills and knowledge.

 

There is a trait in the family called "Thick-headedness" which unfortunately rules the domain and I believe comes from the mothers side of the family. He'll learn, the hard way, but he'll still learn and then he'll say "I should have listened to free advice..."

 

I have managed to get him to use the correct cutting board, the one for poultry, and he doesn't wash what he uses, I do or the missus does so I know what he uses gets washed properly, so there are some positives.

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #11 of 14

Hey Red,

 

I too am fanatic about cleanliness about the prep and cooking of chooks and the equipment involved.  I've *always got a hot pot of soapy water and a towel delegated for those items at hand....I just can't cook it any other way. I'm a home cook, but that makes no difference regarding what could turn into a foul fowl. I love what can be made with it, endless uses.  But, sanitation first, enjoyment later.  No third stage of visiting the "groan throne" afterwards!

DC

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 14

I cut my chicken on the same two wooden boards I use for everything.  After the chicken is cut, I wipe the board down removing all of the slime, then spritz with a very mild solution of household bleach and water to disinfect.  No problems, ever. 

 

Go to a meat market which does poultry, ask them to break a chicken for you, and tell me if you see them using little, individual plastic boards they can throw in the dishwasher. 

 

Because of the way it's raised, slaughter, packed, shipped and marketed factory farmed chicken does require some extra care compared to, say, an onion.  But it's not the black plague, you don't have to wear a mask, gloves or goggles, and -- as long as you're disciplined about cleanliness -- you don't need to buy into Food Network hysteria.  When working with any raw meat, poultry or fish, keep your board organized and free from clutter; wipe it frequently; rinse and wipe your knives between tasks; wash your hands frequently; disinfect as necessary, and you'll be fine. 

 

BDL

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http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
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post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

BDL,

I respect you as a professional and you have given me great advice in the past but I have to disagree with you here on some points and agree with you on others. " -- as long as you're disciplined about cleanliness --" - I agree with. The cutting board opinion - no. If it works for you, great, but others need to develop the 'discipline' first, then they can refine their methods. As for everything else you mentioned - I totally agree, 100%.

 

I once shared a house with another friend and not to put him down in any way but, he was a slob! In the beginning, we took turns cooking meals in an effort to save money and try new things and after having spent way too much time in the throne room afterwards, too many times. I began to watch more closely as to what he was doing while preparing our meals. Needless to say, I quickly changed my mind and started making my own meals. He would use the bathroom without washing in between prep tasks, he never used a cutting board but just used the scratched Formica table top we used as a counter to cut up everything, he would wipe it afterwards but not with anything other than a dry paper towel, raw eggs would go right into the pan on the stove rather than into a cup first to be sure it was viable, I could go on and on but I'm running out of space.

 

He could never comprehend the basics of proper food handling and, being unable to leave the house until after the 'event' after every meal, had become just a part of cooking for him. He could not (would not) ever listen to me when I tried to explain that the 'event' was because of unsanitary conditions while preparing his meal and one day, he would get really sick or worse, get someone else really sick.

 

He has gone all this time without getting really sick, so there's no need to listen because he feels I'm over exaggerating.

 

Now with the young man being home and exhibiting some of the same behavior, I'm deeply concerned. That is why, in MY kitchen, he either does things my way or he doesn't cook in my kitchen. After all, I have to cook there too and should I get sick from HIS poor practices after he leaves?

 

Red.

When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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When it's smoking, it's smoking!
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post #14 of 14

In that situation it would be a good idea to clean your kitchen before cooking -- at least on a temporary basis.  More long term, forbid him to use the kitchen if he can't keep it reasonably clean; or raise his portion of the rent in order to pay for you having to clean it.  His choice.

 

If you have a roommate who can't bother to flush the toilet or wash his hands after using it, get a different roommate. 

 

When I had a slob for a roommate, I stopped doing his dishes and started eating off paper plates I kept in my room.  When the sink would fill up with his old dishes, I'd take them out and dump them on his bed.  He got the hint. 

 

BDL

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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