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Chicken Teriyaki

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

First you need a stock. 

 

Take 2 quarts of water and add a mirepoix.

1 cup of onions

1 cup of carrots

1 cup of celery

Also add 1 cup of portabella mushrooms. 

 

Next add 

 

1 cup of rice wine vinegar

4 oz of sherry wine

4 oz of pickle juice

4 oz of low sodium soy sauce

1 oz of balsamic vinegar

1/2 cup of sliced ginger

1/2 cup of garlic cloves

1 oz of red wine. Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot work best.

1 cup of brown sugar

 

Let this simmer and reduce by half. 

 

After it reduces by half, let it cool and use this to brine your chicken 12 to 24 hours. (Thighs are recommended)

 

After it has marinated, rub the chicken with a mixture of salt, black pepper, and chili powder. Throw it on the grill and cook 3/4th's of the way. 

 

In the meantime, take the leftover brine and strain into a pan over medium-high heat. Make a 1/3 quart mixture of equal parts of rice wine vinegar, soy sauce, and pickle juice. Add roughly 3 ounces to the brine at a time and let it reduce. After it reduces, take the chicken off of the grill and add it into the liquid to finish cooking and add the rest of your mixture to reduce again. If it is a little bit bitter, add brown sugar little by little until you get the sweetness that you like. Reduce until it is thick like syrup. 

 

 

If any of you try this out, let me know what you thought of it. 


Edited by Cookers - 8/13/12 at 2:05am
post #2 of 23

Buon Giorno, Good Morning,

 

I add a little  Mirin wine and Sake wine to my Teriyaki sauce ... 

 

I would not employ Spanish Sherry or Red Wine ... I would work with Japanese Products, as sherry and red wine do  not have the correct flavor profile.

 

Hope this assists.

Margaux.

post #3 of 23

Add red food color to the recipe above take out mirepoix and pickle juice and use as a marinade for chinese roast pork or ribs.(a bit of 5 spice and sesamee oil can be added.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #4 of 23

sub shoaxing wine for the sherry, increase to 5 oz and eliminate red wine

 

sub chinkiang vinegar for the balsamic

 

brown sugar? are you using chinese brown sugar, if not and can't get use regular granulated sugar toasted in a dry skillet until it turns into caramel

 

for soy sauce use 2 oz. light soy and 2 oz. dark soy

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #5 of 23
Thread Starter 

I'm not familiar with Chinese cuisine at all. After trying it out and adding ingredients and taking some away, it's my end result that worked. Sake would take it to even greater lengths, but I don't have any available in my kitchen. 

post #6 of 23

Teriyaki is Japanese. It's as simple as 5 ingredients: soy sauce, sugar, mirin, garlic and ginger. Simmer until thick and brush it on after the first turn on the grill so it glazes and sets without burning.

 

1 cup soy sauce

3/4 cup sugar (white, brown, rock, lots of types will work well)

1/2 cup miri

1 clove garlic crushed

1 slice ginger crushed

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Teriyaki is Japanese.

I wasn't going to mention it lol.gif. I basically went with the original train of thought about how to make a " teriyaki recipe that has the flavor that of a real chinese restaurant" by suggesting ingredients that were Chinese and good substitutions for the ones that were being used so that the end product might be more what was being sought after.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #8 of 23

Buon Giorno, Good Morning,

 

Teri signifies shiny & bright and Yaki means Roast, Broil or Grill ...

 

This dish was one of the many dishes we had learnt to prepare at Le Cordon Blue Madrid Culinary Institute:

 

100 ml. Sake Dry Rice Wine

100 ml. Mirin Rice Wine

100 ml. Dark Soy Sauce

1 tblsp. Sugar

2 tsps. Fresh grated ginger

1 tblsp. garlic minced

 

*** 4 pieces of chicken of choice

*** 1 tblsp. chopped finely of  fresh cilantro herb

*** 1 tblsp. Oil of choice

 

One can marinate the chicken for 12 to 15 minutes, if they wish and grill the chicken or broil.

 

*** TIP: Prick with a fork, or knife, the chicken in various places so that the sauce can penetrate ...

 

 

Hope this has assisted.

Margcata ( Margaux Cintrano )

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

I wasn't going to mention it lol.gif. I basically went with the original train of thought about how to make a " teriyaki recipe that has the flavor that of a real chinese restaurant" by suggesting ingredients that were Chinese and good substitutions for the ones that were being used so that the end product might be more what was being sought after.

 

I can only laugh at my own mistake here. When it comes to French cooking, I can tell you just about anything. When it comes to anything ''Asian'', I can't tell you a single thing. However now looking it up, I see that there is a big difference in ''Asian'' cuisine just in China alone. I knew each country had it's differences, but never knew China was divided into four parts when it comes to the food. The Northwest, Northeast, Southwest, and Southeast all being really different. I thought it was the same through out, but that would be my own ignorance or lack of knowledge making assumptions for me. 

 

So I guess my recipe isn't exactly JAPANESE considering the ingredients used, but it still has a similar flavor imo. I appreciate you guys correcting me here so at least it saved me from looking stupid in person lol. Also I will try out the other recipe's given. 

post #10 of 23

*** Photo Courtesy:  Madrid Culinary Institute Le Cordon Bleu.

 

Here is a photo of the recipe I have followed ...

 

700

 

The plating is quite lovely too.

 

Kind regards.

Margaux Cintrano.

post #11 of 23

? that's chicken teriyaki ?

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #12 of 23

Kaneo, Buonasera, Good Evening,

 

I had taken a course at the Madrid Le Cordon Bleu Culinary Institute to enhance my culinary skills. The photo is chicken teriyaki ...

 

As you can imagine, their are many variations via regional differences, however, this is a standard international recipe.

 

Kind regards.

Margi.

post #13 of 23

marg, I'd love that recipe if you have it on hand, maybe you could post that?

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #14 of 23

Kaneo,

 

Of course you can have the Teriyaki recipe ... It is already posted on Post 8 of this thread: Chicken Teriyaki

 

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask me. 

 

Generally speaking, Japanese cuisine is quite delicate and subtle ...

 

Let me know how it turns out ...

 

Kindest regards.

Margaux.

post #15 of 23

Somebody give me a pair of chopstix now.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #16 of 23
I see, Marg your recipe calls for marinade 12-15 minutes
When I make this recipe (pretty much the same) I put it together after breakfast and leave it in the 'fridge all day and then grill it in the evening, it looks a little different...

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #17 of 23

Buon Giorno Kaneo and Chef Ed,  

 

Firstly, one can marinate the chicken from 12 to 15 minutes up until 2 hours; however, I had found that marinating the chicken for two hours was a little to Over Powering for our palates. We prefer the subtle delicateness verses the intensity that soy can create in addition to the over-saltiness.

 

I use skin on chicken breast sliced ( see photo ) and no food coloring. 

 

I have seen the Salmon Teriyaki recipe posted by a Professional Chef in Jalisco, Guadalajara, Mexico and he marinates for 2 hours, which of course, shall darken the product in marinade.

 

Chef Ed:  I am sending you the chopsticks, and you select the wine !   

Thanks for the compliment.

 

Here is good question: how long do you marinade ( your teriyaki ) chicken or salmon for ? Do you find 2 hours to create a too salty and too over powering profile  ?

 

Look forward to your suggestions.  

 

Have a lovely August,

Marg.  


Edited by margcata - 8/14/12 at 3:59am
post #18 of 23

I once tried a recipe for teriyaki chicken that included roasted chicken bones in the sauce. I cannot find it, but it was great!!!! Anyone have knowledge of such?
 

post #19 of 23

Doughbeers,

 

Thanks for your post.

 

I would believe that using roasted chicken bones in  teriyaki sauce would provide quite a profound flavor profile, yet a slightly different texture too, yes ? 

 

If you ever come across the sauce recipe, please do post it.

 

Thanks,

Margaux.

post #20 of 23

Chicken Teriyarki is a more delicious food recipes,so i can try to make it home by this recipes.licklips.gif
 

post #21 of 23

Raham,

 

Thank you for your contribution.

 

There is also a nice Salmon Teriyaki Fusion posted by a Jalisco, Guadalajara, Mexican Chef and I believe it is located in the:

 

Food Discussion Question Section.

 

Palate wise, I prefer short marination time up to 1/2 hour, verses all day or overnight.

 

My family and I find all day or overnight marinating a bit too  intense & bitey or sharp on our palates.

 

Ciao,

Marge.

post #22 of 23

Margcata,

Thanks for your reply.

I always like chicken food item and i also think chicken teriyaki is more delicious between chicken teriyaki and chicken fry

Sorry this is not your fault but a little mistake my name is Rahman Ahmed not Rahamsmile.gif

post #23 of 23

Apologies for mis-typing your name.

 

Thanks for contribution and feedback.

Marge.

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