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? Crispy Chinese Roast Pork ?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I was at our 'asian market' and they had what was marked pork leg meat and it kinda' looks like belly, but meatier.  It still had the skin attached and I was thinking of attempting Crispy Chinese Roast Pork, YUM!!!

When I search I only come up with recipes using the belly, salt, five spice and sugar.  Would anyone have suggestions, tips, recipes?

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My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #2 of 16

The belly dish is most likely a redcooked pork belly, then given a roast or deep fry to render more fat and crisp it up. It's an excellent dish and red cooked dishes deserve a lot more attention than they get. Shoulder could be treated this way too, particularly with the skin on if you want crisp skin. I'm a big fan of red cooked chicken wings too.

 

The pork shoulder is often used to make various roast pork dishes and would be a good choice. You can find it both skin on and skin off. I've never found pork skin to my liking so if you want crackly pork skin, I don't have a lot to offer for advice there, just what I've read.

 

Of course you can make pretty good char siu with strips cut from the pork shoulder as well. Lots of recipes recommend leaner cuts, but the result isn't as moist as from the shoulder.

 

Red cooking is best if you can devote some freezer space to a gallon of broth that you'll reuse over the years. Of course, you can mix up a batch of broth and then discard it afterwards, but they get better with use. And there are some shortcut broths that get used too for things like soy sauce chicken.

 

Tell us more about what you're wanting to do, and what cuts interest you for doing it.

 

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=eIIrRUHGJawC&pg=PA148&lpg=PA148&dq=chilled+red-cooked+beef&source=bl&ots=F3_c2AQXuC&sig=DjVtCAPERca4EIJ7xvIEvWSmCzM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=8BQoUMy1K7SGiQLPk4CwDA&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=chilled%20red-cooked%20beef&f=false Scroll down that linked book page and you'll see my favorite red-cooked broth base. The only thing I'd change is to reduce the star anise some.

 

Darn, that link keeps jumping to chicken even though it says beef. I'll work on gettin the link to work right.

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Siew yuk, this kind of roast pork, the type with the REALLY crispy skin, good meat to fat ratio, oh my I'm just drooling allover the place thinking about it! 

 

1000

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #4 of 16

The golden color on that pork looks like annatto oil.... here's a Vietnamese recipe: 

 

http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog/2010/03/crisp-roasted-pork-belly-recipe-thit-heo-quay.html

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 

thanks guys,

but can I make this using what is being called 'leg meat' at the asian market (I'm not real comfortable with that word, but that's what they call it here) rather than using the pork belly meat?

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #6 of 16

I think you can make a good dish that way yes though some would quibble as to if it is still Siew Yuk. Don't let that stop you.

 

For clarification, the Chinese have a high textural interest in their food and would find the play of crisp skin against the soft fat with the chew of the meat.

 

When I was looking at recipes I saw this one: http://rasamalaysia.com/pork-belly-recipe-siu-yuk/  I have no idea what's in the spiced ginger powder. That was a new one to me.

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

Wow!

I never realized that this dish was so involved…

I’m guessing the baking/roasting technique is to ensure that you don’t have a house full of smoke, right?  So, I could place the marinated meat on a rack over water in a roasting pan? 

I have the hot box on now, with a hunk-o KALUA PORK!!! In there and I was thinking that I could put the Siu Yuk (I was spelling it wrong,eh?) in at the same time, but alas, I have no white pepper, so into the deep freeze for now and I’ll give this a go later.

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #8 of 16

There's a lot of variant spellings of Chinese food. There's been greater consistency since about 1980 with some new laws and standards within China on pinyin. Think about the switch from Peking to Beijing.

post #9 of 16

Could be a boned out hock or 1/2 leg. Butts or shoulder is good for oriental cooking, as even are the end flap on the ribs

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
So, chefed, would the leg meat wind up being tougher than if I used the butt or shoulder? Should I consider using that leg meat for something else and wait for the belly meat? This 'Asian market' normally carries the belly,but they didn't this last visit. There is a Chinese place in town that is halfway decent, on Sundays they serve dim sum along with siu yuk, but their char siu is junk!

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #11 of 16

Since the leg of the animal goes through a lot of exercise it usually is tougher.Thats why most legs of anything are roast, boiled, steamed or smoked and cured. Butt or loin woulsd be more tender. You want some fat on it. I love dim-sum. Take all the trim from the meat grind it add scallions some egg white to bind  and spices wrap in won ton skins  egg wash then deep fry. Yum Yum can also be used to fill dim_ sum .

Next time you have a party, set up a chinese dim-sum and dumpling bar with assortment of dumplings and fillings.. It's good, people enjoy, its easy to keep hot and its inexpensive. put out sauces and dips with them  wassabi, ponzu, hoisen, orange pineapple duck sauce, terriaki, oyster etc.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 16

Kaneo, Buon Giorno, Good Morning,

 

"Drool on the Computer,  photo of your Pork " ...

 

I would like your recipe when you have a free moment ...

 

Thanks for posting ...

Margi. 

post #13 of 16

Use the belly for this.  The leg skin is a lot tougher.  The technique is not difficult.  I like to use plain salt on the skin and roast it in the oven on a rack.  There will be a lot of smoke so put a little water in the drip pan.

 

My mom likes to do it in one of those tabletop convection broilers.

post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 

Kuan, could you share your recipe?

there's only two places here in the DESERT that I can find roast pork, and they're kinda' far from us...

yesterday, I got Kalua Pig down pat, so now I've moved on to siu yuk-crispy chinese roast pork

 

Marg, I'm afraid you miss understood, I'm trying to figure out how to make this at home with the generous help of CT members ... that's a file photo I had, not my own creation, YET that is!

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #15 of 16

Love you description   ""The Desert""  Be grateful you have little humidity, here you sweat from morning till night, but I guess it keeps your pores clean?

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 

Believe you me chefed, where we live, it is the desert!  Sonoran desert...

We are in the middle of pretty much nothing! 

Don't get me wrong, I love the peace and quiet for a change,

I do miss the 'city' from time to time.

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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