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Charcuterie - Getting a book on it tomorrow, anyone into that?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

I am anxiously awaiting my first book on charcuterie. It seems like a logical "next step" for me after getting into food preservation with pickling and fermentation. I was able to look at a little of the book from amazon and it does seem as though it will be fairly labor intensive and there are some very precise steps, such as blending a meat and crushed ice mixture until it reaches an exact temperature of 55F then adding in frozen lard and blending again until it hits 58F.

 

I was wondering if anyone here has ventured into that world. I am sure some of you have created your own sausages, but I am really most excited about the cured meats like Salami and Soppressata. I understand there are also smoke cured meats so I may be in the market for a cold smoker in the future!

post #2 of 19

Air curing like the soppressata you mention requires the right temp and humidity controls. Either you live in the right conditions and don't mind the smell or you build a mutant refrigerator and venting system to handle it.

 

Lots of other good charcuterie to do that doesn't require all that.

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ah, I didn't know how exactly it was cured since I don't have the book yet. I did see a DIY project today where a guy used a wine cooler to maintain the exact temperature. He also added a humidifier, with a humidity controller, as well as a couple small fans to provide the correct circulation. I live in Florida so if I hung that stuff outside I'd get all kinds of interesting nasties with our afternoon showers, high heat, and humidity. I'll have to stick to salt and smoke curing and maybe get into confit!

post #4 of 19

Which book???  Please take a look at the Mangalitsa Pig for it renders the best quality fat known. Ruhlman's book??  It rules.


Edited by kokopuffs - 8/13/12 at 1:17pm

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Which book???  Please take a look at the Mangalitsa Pig for it renders the best quality fat known. Ruhlman's book??  It rules.

 

Yea it's the Ruhlman book "Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing" it's the first book I will have on the subject. I've seen the pig you are mentioning. It is specific to Spain if I recall correctly. Kind of the "Kobe" of the pig world. I believe their diet of acorns in addition to the genetics contribute to it being the finest pig for curing in the world but a lot of their finished product had to do with the climate and the expert craftmanship. I watched a whole show on them and got really excited at the time!

post #6 of 19

   I can't wait to hear about your progress!  Please keep us updated!

post #7 of 19

The Ruhlman book is quite good. He's got a new one out focusing on the Italians style air cured charcuterie. haven't looked at that one yet.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

 

Yea it's the Ruhlman book "Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing" it's the first book I will have on the subject. I've seen the pig you are mentioning. It is specific to Spain if I recall correctly. Kind of the "Kobe" of the pig world. I believe their diet of acorns in addition to the genetics contribute to it being the finest pig for curing in the world but a lot of their finished product had to do with the climate and the expert craftmanship. I watched a whole show on them and got really excited at the time!

 

Mangalitsa was bred in Hungary in early 19th century from wild boar and some Hungarian domestic breeds. The Spanish breeds famous for producing the well-known ham also come directly from wild hog, but they're different breeds.

post #9 of 19

Here's the article concerning the Mangalitsa Pig that I recently read.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastshores View Post

 

 

I was wondering if anyone here has ventured into that world. I am sure some of you have created your own sausages, but I am really most excited about the cured meats like Salami and Soppressata. I understand there are also smoke cured meats so I may be in the market for a cold smoker in the future!

While the Salami and Soppressata require controled conditions, 55*F and 85%RH along with Fermentation and the use of Cure #2, Sodium Nitrite and Nitrate, Other types of Curing like Ham and various forms of Bacon, Belly, Canadian and Buckboard (from Boston Butt) are very easy. While a Smoker that will Smoke a full range of meats, Nose to Tail at various temps from ambient to 300*F is nice. A cheap Cold Smoker can be made from a Cardboard or other Box, a Juice Can full of Wood Chips and a Soldering Iron. The key is proper Curing. Specifically the right ingredients for the amount of Meat and application of those ingredients for right time period. Follow the Cure with some Smoke and in the case of Ham, Canadian and Buckboard Bacon some Heat to get them up to 145-155*F so they are Ready to Eat. And you are good to go, not to mention wondering why people even bother buying Bacon at the Grocery Store when it is so easy to make! Here is a link to a great step by step to build a Curing Cabinet for the Italian Salumi and other Dry Cured Charcuterie, as well as some great Recipes. Enjoy the the Book...JJ

 

http://mattikaarts.com/blog/charcuterie/meat-curing-at-home-the-setup/

post #11 of 19

I have, and like, Fritz Sonnenschmidt's book on charcuterie.  IMO a very professional text. 

post #12 of 19

I like what Kuan recommended and just ordered the book.    Along with a Halls Combination Soft Arkansas and Surgical Black Stone, I'm good to go with my Norton Tri Hone.
 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Reply
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

I just got the book in.. I will read it front to back. My father grew up in harder times and he remembers curing pork.. even in small smoke houses. I am fascinated and will try to honor my fore fathers as well as the lessons in this book. You can expect some posts and photos from me over the next few months.

post #14 of 19

If you pop on to Facebook and hunt for a group called "The Salt Cured Pig" pig you will find a good selection of seasoned professional chefs and Charcuterie experts. We even have a few James Beard winning chefs and writers in there. Just ask to join and we answer almost any question you ask. 

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanPrimus View Post

If you pop on to Facebook and hunt for a group called "The Salt Cured Pig" pig you will find a good selection of seasoned professional chefs and Charcuterie experts. We even have a few James Beard winning chefs and writers in there. Just ask to join and we answer almost any question you ask. 


Thanks for that! I requested to join, looks like it will be a great resource.

post #16 of 19

Be careeful as most commercially cured meats also contain preservatives which you can't get.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanPrimus View Post

If you pop on to Facebook and hunt for a group called "The Salt Cured Pig" pig you will find a good selection of seasoned professional chefs and Charcuterie experts. We even have a few James Beard winning chefs and writers in there. Just ask to join and we answer almost any question you ask. 

 

At FB I just requested to be a member.  How long does it take to receive a reply?

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #18 of 19

I just entered you in...

post #19 of 19

I just joined.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
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