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I'm a chef that owns his own restaurant!!! I need help!!! - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Thread Starter 

Well I think I am hearing we are just not a QSR then. And that is something we do not want to be. We want fresh home cooked meals. Something you just can not get in this area. We know our food is better then the other 3 restaurants here because we have tried them all. We know we give the most food and our customers know that to. Esp when the owners and families of the other businesses frequent our establishment. And then add our stuff to their menus.....

post #32 of 53

Try and build your menu withingredients that cn beused as a component part of a large amount of dishes. This way your inventory of items is less. As you say you use peppers in everything BUT when they are not in season or price is realy hi what do you do.  As far as frying oil if you strain daily and when not at peak time turn 1 off. and the  other one temp down it will last a lot longer.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #33 of 53

Sorry!

I had looked at the menu and saw the cake with rings and no mention of bread pudding!

Should have known better, right?

About the fish... you are being squeezed out by the larger places.

Does no one know how it feels to be just starting out and trying to keep your head above water?

 

mimi

post #34 of 53

So you are breaking even.  That's good.  Consider yourself well capitalized.  You don't need much more to take you into the black.  :)  A couple more covers during lunch and dinner will get you there. 

 

One suggestion is to look at your best selling items and consider pricing on those.  If something is selling through the roof then you might consider raising the price by a quarter or so.  If something isn't selling despite the low pricing then just cut it out.  This will make your inventory easier to manage.

 

I also like that idea of serving 7oz of fish in three portions.  The perceived value will be better.

post #35 of 53
Thread Starter 

thanks everyone!!!

post #36 of 53

start with your menu.....streamlining off the items that are not selling or are low sellers.....are you cooking yourself?.......i was in south Florida for 20 yrs and found i had to be multi-functional in food......when weddings and catering were slow the restaurant picked up....when the restaurant was slow.....found myself manufacturing items like chocolates to distribute online and to retail vendors....there are many ways to increase revenue....in today's economy your restaurant needs to be multi-functional to earn a profit.....I would need to actually see the menu and a picture of the business to really make suggestions it also depends on your location and whats available in your area.....simple changes make big differences.....like spending your time wisely and getting the right help in the right place....standard food cost should not exceed 33 percent for sure and the labor/time to make that item should be considered....i found myself waiting tables at times to cut the shifts just to make the difference in the long run at the end of the year.....there are also methodical ways to cut cost like counter service verse table service.....but not knowing the operation i could not begin to guess....hope this has been food for thought for you.....your welcome to contact me <edit> by PM, if you need an outsiders look and thoughts....i'm retired now and enjoy a challenge! <edit>

post #37 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

Your costs were $19782.42. How much did you spend on food and beverage? Take that figure and divide it by 19862.86. Then multiply that by 100 and that will be your food and beverage cost percentage. For a QSR it should be around 32%.

 

How much did you spend on labor. Take that figure and divide it by 1982.86. Then multiply that by 100 and that will be your labor cost percentage. For a QSR it should be around 29%.

What is QSR? just curious.  

post #38 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atibbs314 View Post

What is QSR? just curious.  

QSR = Quick Service Restaurant

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #39 of 53

On of the best business models is to limit your hours. Couple of years ago a place in NC called 12 Bones got nationwide critical acclaim as GMA(?) best BBQ in the country, been there it is very good, they control costs by only being open from 11-6, 5 days a week, and the place is packed. No W/E and the owner told me that they created demand, limited the menu and hours to control labor, insurance, utilities, and waste, quit frankly thought it was brilliant, sounds like you have a similar niche.

BTW PM me and I'll give you a gator source in Florida.

 

 

Best,

 

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

It is art to conceal art......

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"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

It is art to conceal art......

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post #40 of 53

contact me at allrallys@gmail.com

post #41 of 53

Altes, What's your agenda?


Edited by chefbuba - 10/3/12 at 7:39am
post #42 of 53

what is your current menu now and are you making everything from scratch?

post #43 of 53


Where in South Florida  I was there many years. Everglades Club, St. Andrews, Ballen Isles, Hunters Run etc. all mostly Palm Beach area

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #44 of 53

Hey @chefedb & @Chef Santos this thread is 2 years old almost to the day and the last "recent" response besides youall was10, 2012, fyi.

 

 

 

Food for thought,

 

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

It is art to conceal art......

Reply

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

It is art to conceal art......

Reply
post #45 of 53

LOL So easy to do on this site, 'specially when the months and days line up. 

 

Quick rule of thumb: if the post shows an actual date, rather than a number of hours or a number of days, 

look twice at the actual date. :-)

post #46 of 53

@Meezenplaz true, so true, in his defense, Chef Santos is new and this was his first post! Don't feel bad @Chef Santos has happened to most if not all of us here on CT. Have posted in "dated" conversations usually start with something like, hey know this is an older post or sorry I'm late to the party but had something I wanted to add.

 

Welcome to Chef Talk btw.

 

 

Cheers!

 

EDG

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

It is art to conceal art......

Reply

"Ars Est Celare Artem"

 

It is art to conceal art......

Reply
post #47 of 53
I'm glad it was resurrected, good reading material! I really hope they are doing well. The bottom line; so many angles to it.

My food cost tip is micro manage everything.

Know where your food is and where it's going and why.

Every dollar counts.

I'm so cheap.

Only way to save money is don't spend it.

Sales fix everything.

Haha good luck
post #48 of 53

I think they folded.  Restaurant reality hits again.  :(  It's so hard to run a southern food place up north.

 

http://atouchofcajuncafe.com/

post #49 of 53

Yeah, hopefully he got out before it was too late, and didn't lose a house or anything like that. 

post #50 of 53

I hear ya. 

If he wasn´t even making enough money to pay his employees salary, i can only hope, the dude managed to get some cash in to pay everyone and cover his losses, Hopefully he didn´t lose too much or anything aside from time, and money he had...

 

Agree with @chefboyOG that im glad the thread was ressurected, it was a good read and who knows who else it might have helped.

Aside from that i enjoyed reading everyones advice and i plan on keeping some of them. 

Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.

Dr.Seuss

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post #51 of 53
I went bankrupt once, in the late 80's, not fun.  
Having made that mistake once I'm a serious penny pincher in he kitchen but not to the point of being "penny wise and pound foolish".


Quote:
Originally Posted by cajunfman View Post
 

Cajun sausage is really expensive.



If you have the time, and if needed, can get the variance from the local Health Dept. I have found that I could save quite a bit by making any kind of sausage.  Once you pay for the grinder and stuffer, and a cheap smoker, you are ready to kick some ass. Even if you "cheap out" and get a Kitchener #32 meat grinder, and a Kitchener 5-Lb. Stainless Steel Sausage Stuffer. and do it by hand, I dare say you will come out ahead. (I have both of these products and process 200+ pounds of venison yearly.) Granted, Andouille, is usually smoked twice, once as the Butt, then again after stuffing but I can't see it adding that much to the overall cost.  If you are paying more than $4.00/Lb. for your Andouille through the door, I dare say it might be a viable way to save some $$$.


During our "down time" at the Club, we cure our own bacon, and produce all our own sausages.  Even with the added labor cost, we easily do it for less than ordering it in from Sysco.
(Cryovac boneless pork butt is $2.09 per pound, and the spices are dirt cheap...)  I'd put the quality and flavor of our hand-made product up against any pre-made commercial product, even at twice the cost.

These are some Kielbasa and bun sized "Kellies" we made this week:

post #52 of 53

Might start with:

 

3X +10

 

Limited Menu.  Try something like seven items, four or five sides.

The old-fashioned "meat & threes" or meat & twos" still can work.  Lots of successful places only have a choice of two meats and three sides to choose from.  They change daily and advertise a week in advance.  Most I've seen use a big blackboard on the wall as their menu.

 

Random Thoughts From A Random Person

 

Market research.

Sampling.

 

"On Sale" ketchup (.89 to .99 for 24 oz bottles)  #10 ketchups=waste and spoilage for you.  Careful with the phantom savings on stuff.

 

What do you serve?

 

Back door closed and locked.

Smoke breaks are a good time to get rid of stolen stuff (to their buddies that drive up..."hey, great!  ribeyes tonight!  see if you can get a bottle of A-1, too!)

 

Watch out for the to-go orders.

1) Employees overfilling for friends.  They'll also do it for dining room to a lesser extent.

2) Employees meeting friends out back with food containers or packages.

3) 10 packages of ketchup not necessary for a FF order.  Or handfuls of salt and pepper packets.

4) Cooking excess product.  "Oops, sorry"  I either take it to a customer in the dining room or throw it away in front of them.  Gotta stop this stuff from happening.  Let'em eat it and you're dead.

 

Cameras.

Outside coolers entered only with you present.

Examine trash before it's taken out.  At least act like you're doing it.

Only you have keys.  If you lose them replace complete locks.  Use the $90 each locks...keys can't be duplicated.

 

Employees can watch you all the time.  The reverse is never true.

 

P.S.

If your customers truly want cheap prices, you'll have to give'em cheap food.  Have you thought about how much money you'd make if you had NO (0) food cost??  Plug your numbers in, it still might not be too great.

 

 

 

Hamburger patties  and pork chops WILL fit in bras, hats and crotches just fine.  So will lots of other stuff.  Including money.

Baggy pants can hide slabs of ribs, steaks, chickens, etc.

 

Don't pay any attention to me, I'm just rambling.  Something's weird, that's for sure.

post #53 of 53

Haha, very creative, I doubt many rest owners ever think of most of that stuff. 

I loved the smuggling food out in the trash--never thought of that one--if you wrapped

it up all snug in stretch wrap, it could stay serviceable in even the trashiest trash cans. 

"Hey, I'm emptying my prep-trash, boss, be right back!!"

And out the door goes 4 steaks or a pound of shrimp.:rolleyes:

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