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What Did You Have For Dessert? - Page 9

post #241 of 488

Bought dessert from a local French restaurant... lemon tart + pear/almond tart:

 

post #242 of 488
Thread Starter 

hmmm, I don't have anything for dessert tonight, so I think we're goin gto raid the Easter candies that I have stashed away from sticky little fingers... I love Junior Mints ... I found the 'theatre size boxes' at Walmart... so I think we'll watch a PPV at home ... don't judge me :p

post #243 of 488

Tonite I enjoyed a plain ol' Klondike Bar.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #244 of 488
Thread Starter 

Ice Cream Brownie Sundae

post #245 of 488
Made some cookies, some were rolled in rapadura and others in coconut sugar.
post #246 of 488

They look good FF. 

 

I made some C.B's the other day. I toss one coat of sugar on then wait, add another thin coat. I am not a fan of super dark sugar as I really don't like the flavor. 

 

 Tap and crack ! 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #247 of 488

Beautiful brulees.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #248 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
 

They look good FF. 

 

I made some C.B's the other day. I toss one coat of sugar on then wait, add another thin coat. I am not a fan of super dark sugar as I really don't like the flavor. Tap and crack ! 

Thanks Petals! And bravo on your crème brûlées, very nice. I use the same technique you do with the sugar. My wife did an experiment trying to burn all sorts of different sugars and ended up deciding that white sugar was the best for crème brûlée, so that's the one I also use although I love the flavor of brown sugar. Or did you mean how much it's burnt? I personally like it quite dark, like on the one you singled out on the bottom photo. Then again... I remember my first catering gig. I had to make 200 crème brûlée, and by the time I was done torching them the chef said they were too dark. He looked at me straight in the eyes and said with a very authoritative tone: "brûlée doesn't mean burnt!!!" - I knew better than to tell him that it does. :lol: 

 

Tonight I made some wild blueberry financiers. I wanted them to have a strong taste of almond so I only use almond meal, and even subbed some of the flour for a bit more almond meal, and even added a tiny splash of almond extract. 

 

post #249 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

Bought dessert from a local French restaurant... lemon tart + pear/almond tart:

 


I can't believe I missed this post. These are the favorite desserts of my life. Lucky you have a place nearby who sells them.

 

 

 

those fananciers look moist and delish.


Edited by Pollopicu - 5/8/14 at 9:00am
“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #250 of 488
Aside from crostata de ricotta, creme brulee is my all time favorite dessert. A few years back i had a cognac ginger brulee on the menu that sold like hot cakes. thanks for the wonderful reminder petals....looking at your photos i may just have to bring it back again this summer....i like to rotate desserts from year to year just for the why not factor, but there are a few that i can't ever take off for fear of lynching (colorado peach crumble & a key lime pie)...the brulee technique that i have settled into is to blend both turbinado and white sugar in a squeeze bottle....coat the custards with a thin layer and melt, then coat with a second layer and continue to caramelize... i get the deep brown of the turbinado sugar without over caramelizing and the ease of using white sugar, and it's not too sweet...besides the eating, i truly love making them.
@FF...he sings, he dances, he plays guitar...and he cooks and bakes!!! Who knew?? wink.gif

joey
Only thing that is bugging me about your lemon tart FF is that not only is the slice on top a lime slice, it is a thick, uneven one at that. Doesn't seem to go with the delicateness of the tart itself.
Edited by durangojo - 5/8/14 at 11:43am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #251 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

Thanks Petals! And bravo on your crème brûlées, very nice. I use the same technique you do with the sugar. My wife did an experiment trying to burn all sorts of different sugars and ended up deciding that white sugar was the best for crème brûlée, so that's the one I also use although I love the flavor of brown sugar. Or did you mean how much it's burnt? I personally like it quite dark, like on the one you singled out on the bottom photo. Then again... I remember my first catering gig. I had to make 200 crème brûlée, and by the time I was done torching them the chef said they were too dark. He looked at me straight in the eyes and said with a very authoritative tone: "brûlée doesn't mean burnt!!!" - I knew better than to tell him that it does. lol.gif  

Tonight I made some wild blueberry financiers. I wanted them to have a strong taste of almond so I only use almond meal, and even subbed some of the flour for a bit more almond meal, and even added a tiny splash of almond extract. 



I try not to visit this thread often so this is my monthly visit and yes indeed it ignited my sweet tooth. You're much better than me FF, I would have said "oh yes it does!" and pulled out my smartphone and found an online dictionary to prove it. But I'm a brat.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #252 of 488
Yes, even though the literal french translation for creme brulee is burned cream, it is important to not actually burn the sugar on top.....it should be dark, but golden....guess that would make it dark golden, n'est ce pas? wink.gif

joey
Edited by durangojo - 5/8/14 at 12:10pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #253 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

Yes, even though the literal french translation is burned cream, it is important to not actually burn the sugar on top....

You're right obviously Joey, it just ... sounded funny when he said it... 

post #254 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

joey
Only thing that is bugging me about your lemon tart FF is that not only is the slice on top a lime slice, it is a thick, uneven one at that. Doesn't seem to go with the delicateness of the tart itself.

It doesn't bother me, I like the color contrast. I like to bite into it and get what I call an acid-high. :lol: But the same baker makes another lemon tart that I prefer, it has less custard, doesn't have that half scoop of custard added on top of the regular custard layer like the one on my photo, has more crust, and a better crust too, and has the meringue, which I love. I'm not sure why he makes two different lemon tarts, probably because some customers prefer one or the other? 

post #255 of 488
I must also add Cassata cake to my top favorites dessert list.....actually i dreamt about it last night( i blame FF's photos). i haven't had it for ages, and have never made it, but i just can't seem to get it out of my head, so i guess its time to bite the bullet and make one. My sicilian grandparents owned a bakery back in their day so i have very fond memories of eating this dessert, among many others. does anyone know of this wonderful Sicilian delight? simply put it is sponge cake with ricotta cream and marzipan(usually colored green but not always) and as you can see from all the google pics there are many variations...usually it is garnished with candied fruit, but not always...sometimes the ricotta mixture has candied fruit in it, but not always, so on and so on....you get the picture....one thing that is always in common is that it is always delicious...oh my!

oh yeah, and tiramisu and Zabaglione(i prefer it cold) with fresh berries and ricotta turnovers(cassatelle) and filled fig cookies, and on and on and on...... smile.gif


https://www.google.com/search?q=cassata&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=DzNtU5PjGZGSyAT6hYGABw&ved=0CEMQiR4&biw=1024&bih=648

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #256 of 488

I served the C.B's according to the second pic. 

As for brown sugar, yes , it is good too. I like to use maple sugar sometimes. 

Like all dark or colored sugars, it needs to be spread on a tray and air dried till there is no humidity , then sprinkled on . 

 

@ Joey: It would be a great dessert to have at the restaurant. I make mine in advance, toss them in the fridge (taste great a day or two old- time to mature) and torch as needed. Those ones had Grand Marnier in them, one could always use triple sec. They are even better with a thin layer of chocolate on the bottom.

 

Those Financiers look fantastic !!! There is something to be said about adding almond extract in baking, it gives a wonderful taste to the dessert.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #257 of 488
@ petals.....at 8500 feet we have no humidity......zip,zero, zilch,nada, but that is a very good point for all the flatlanders! wink.gif

joey
Yes, i have decided to put it back on the menu again...thanks again for the reminder. The ginger cognac(Canton) has a wonderful warm intriguing flavor without being overpowering....have you tried it? It's quite marvelous...truly.

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #258 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

I must also add Cassata cake to my top favorites dessert list (...) oh yeah, and tiramisu and Zabaglione(i prefer it cold) with fresh berries and ricotta turnovers(cassatelle) and filled fig cookies, and on and on and on...... smile.gif

I'll take all of those, they all sound good to me!! 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

 

Those Financiers look fantastic !!! There is something to be said about adding almond extract in baking, it gives a wonderful taste to the dessert.

Thank you Petals! They disappeared within minutes!! I wanted a strong almond taste this time, and less of a cakey texture... almost like if there was marzipan in the dough... the almond extract definitely helped. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
 

I served the C.B's according to the second pic. 

As for brown sugar, yes , it is good too. I like to use maple sugar sometimes. 

Like all dark or colored sugars, it needs to be spread on a tray and air dried till there is no humidity , then sprinkled on . 

I had no idea. Thanks for the tip! Looks like we should re-do the experiment. Air dried means you just wait for the sugar to dry? We have a dry climate here so that shouldn't be too difficult. I wonder how long you leave the sugar there? One or two days? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post
 

@ Joey: It would be a great dessert to have at the restaurant. I make mine in advance, toss them in the fridge (taste great a day or two old- time to mature) and torch as needed. Those ones had Grand Marnier in them, one could always use triple sec. They are even better with a thin layer of chocolate on the bottom.

Grand Marnier sounds great, Cointreau sounds great, Ginger-cointreau sounds great... I make a very simple chestnut creme brulee sometimes, sweetened with chestnut tree honey... it's wonderful and doesn't require you heat up the cream before hand since there's no vanilla... love it. Sometimes after I pour the cream in the ramekins, I drop a tablespoon of crème de marrons in the middle of the cream. It's a little surprise when you're eating the CB, it's fun and delicious. 

 

Today I made Belgian brownies with Valrhona Grand Cru Caraibe chocolate. I must be on a sugar high. :lol:

 


Edited by French Fries - 5/9/14 at 10:14pm
post #259 of 488

Very nice, FF.

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #260 of 488

Thank you Pollopicu! :)

post #261 of 488
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

I must also add Cassata cake to my top favorites dessert list.....actually i dreamt about it last night( i blame FF's photos). i haven't had it for ages, and have never made it, but i just can't seem to get it out of my head, so i guess its time to bite the bullet and make one. My sicilian grandparents owned a bakery back in their day so i have very fond memories of eating this dessert, among many others. does anyone know of this wonderful Sicilian delight? simply put it is sponge cake with ricotta cream and marzipan(usually colored green but not always) and as you can see from all the google pics there are many variations...usually it is garnished with candied fruit, but not always...sometimes the ricotta mixture has candied fruit in it, but not always, so on and so on....you get the picture....one thing that is always in common is that it is always delicious...oh my!

oh yeah, and tiramisu and Zabaglione(i prefer it cold) with fresh berries and ricotta turnovers(cassatelle) and filled fig cookies, and on and on and on...... smile.gif


https://www.google.com/search?q=cassata&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=DzNtU5PjGZGSyAT6hYGABw&ved=0CEMQiR4&biw=1024&bih=648

 

YUM!

cassata cake with cream in Prescott 

post #262 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post

 

 

Look at that. Beautiful.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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post #263 of 488
So just curious FF....did you wait for them to cool down completely or did you eat one when it was that perfect moment of just set up but still warm inside? Those moments don't happen or come around often enough and should be savored with guilt free glee and delight....it is one of the perks of being the cook and the baker...you know,like getting to pull the crispy bits off of a just pulled out of the oven pork butt!
funny, i normally don't really have much of a sweet tooth but lately i've been jones ing....must be tailgating your sugar high!
your chestnut creme brulee is intriguing...perfect ending for a winter holiday dinner.....but no heating of the milk? I've never read about that technique before...so does the sugar totally dissolve in cold milk? My thinking is that heating the milk 'tightens' it before adding to the egg/sugar mix but also because the milk/egg/sugar mix is somewhat warm when you pour it into the brulee dishes, it will bake more evenly and be even more 'custardy'......

joey
p.s. Certainly and in no way am i questioning your technique...i am mostly just curious
Edited by durangojo - 5/9/14 at 8:36pm

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #264 of 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

So just curious FF....did you wait for them to cool down completely or did you eat one when it was that perfect moment of just set up but still warm inside? 
 
When I do that specific recipe, I find that the brownies taste better at room temp. You know it's funny, after they came out of the oven, my wife wanted to try one, I told her they were better cold, she said it was nonsense and even the baker warms them before selling them. I don't know. Maybe it's just me? I always hated it when you go to a really fancy 3 michelin star restaurant in France and they nuke a perfectly good chocolate cake before serving it. Why? But I digress, you weren't talking reheating, you were talking out of the oven. Well I waited, but I wasn't successful in convincing the rest of the family to wait. 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

funny, i normally don't really have much of a sweet tooth but lately i've been jones ing....must be tailgating your sugar high!
 
That's exactly how I feel: I normally don't care much for sweets but lately I've been craving all sorts cakes. Today I bought a pack of madeleines! 
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by durangojo View Post

your chestnut creme brulee is intriguing...perfect ending for a winter holiday dinner.....but no heating of the milk? I've never read about that technique before...so does the sugar totally dissolve in cold milk? My thinking is that heating the milk 'tightens' it before adding to the egg/sugar mix but also because the milk/egg/sugar mix is somewhat warm when you pour it into the brulee dishes, it will bake more evenly and be even more 'custardy'......
 
I don't use any sugar in the custard. One tablespoon of honey is enough to sweeten 4 crème brûlées. I suppose this could work with any kind of honey but I really like the chestnut tree honey because of its strong flavor. I bake them in a bain marie and they bake evenly. If you want to give it a try...: 
For 4 crème brûlées:

• 4 egg yolks

• 1/2 Liter cream

• 1 heaping Tb chestnut tree honey

 

Mix yolks with honey. Incorporate cream. Bake at 250F for 50mn. I sometimes leave them in a little longer...

 
 
post #265 of 488

@French Fries Those brownies look absolutely irresistible!

@petalsandcoco Crème brûlée, my favorite dessert! Perfectly executed. I often have them as a dessert when eating out. It's my "barometer" for evaluating the quality of the restaurant.

post #266 of 488
@French Fries is that just honey or does it taste like chestnuts?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #267 of 488

Thanks Chris! @Koukouvagia it's really just honey, it has a very strong taste, which has a slight resemblance to chestnuts. It's one of those things people usually love or hate. My dad, who loves honey and loves chestnuts, cannot eat chestnut tree honey, he has an averse reaction to it. It's that strong. What's cool is, when you use it to sweeten a crème Brûlée, the taste of the honey mellows and becomes much more subtle and smooth. Like hugging a baby bear. :lol:

post #268 of 488

I made a souffle that didn't quite rise the way I wanted it to today.

 

wonk, wonk, wonk...

 

http://s29.postimg.org/adtmi4es7/DSCN4545.jpg

“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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“After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relations.”
Oscar Wilde

 

 

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post #269 of 488
Ye
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

I made a souffle that didn't quite rise the way I wanted it to today.

wonk, wonk, wonk...

DSCN4545.jpg
Yea that looks terrible lol

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #270 of 488
Originally Posted by Pollopicu View Post

 

http://s29.postimg.org/adtmi4es7/DSCN4545.jpg

 

Nice.

Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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Gebe Gott uns allen, uns Trinkern, einen so leichten und so schönen Tod! Joseph Roth.
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