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What Did You Have For Dessert? - Page 2

post #31 of 243

28... Aren't you kind. Try 44!

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Nicko 
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post #32 of 243

Wow happy belated birthday Nicko!  :)  Nice cake!

post #33 of 243

Thanks guys. I miss the old feature on vbulletin that announced peoples birthdays. Kuan, why do you have so many badges? I mean I know your good but I didn't think you were that good? ha ha

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post #34 of 243
Thread Starter 

nicko, is that chocolate ganache cascading over the dish?  man!!  where's the ice cream AND MY FORK!! 

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post #35 of 243
Kgirl,

It looks like a chocolate colored cake plate, high gloss to give that effect. Maybe I'm wrong, just so nice.

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post #36 of 243

The icing was a make it up as you go. My wife said she threw in powdered sugar, butter, chocolate till she got the consistency she liked and then Voila! It was very tasty. The cake plate is a dark brown.

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Nicko 
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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post #37 of 243

Petals, you are a true artist with cake.  That is just gorgeous and I bet it tastes even better than it looks!  So pretty.

post #38 of 243

petals, aka dessert maven,

i was recently reading the history of paris-brest-paris, about both the oldest long distance bicycle race(paris to the breton city of brest on the atlantic),and the dessert(cream puff cake) the the race inspired in 1891.  

while the bicycle race is exciting, it is the dessert itself that i find beyond fantasmic and simply spectacular. i haven't been able to get it out of my head for some reason and am afraid it will continue to haunt me until i give in and make it!  have you made this petals? not counting patience what is the difficulty level> it is the creme chiboust which is new to me....seems futzy or tempermental...is it?  is the dessert still always made in a circle to represent a bicycle wheel?  any pointers are always appreciated.......thanks

 

joey


Edited by durangojo - 10/15/12 at 11:14am

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #39 of 243

Joey, of all the recipes for Paris-Brest, I find Pol Martin (recipe cited) has the easiest technique.  I will try to make one in the near future with pics if you would like.  It is a nice recipe with a great taste. As for diffulty level ? On a scale of 10, its a 3-4. The only real factor here is your puff.

This is not something that is made often but it has a charm to it when served table side/sliced in front of clients.

 

Paris-Brest

 

Almond Sugar

1 cup icing sugar

1/3 cup slivered almonds

 

Cake Assembly

1 recipe cream puff dough

1 ½ cups heavy cream

1 tsp vanilla

2 tbsp icing sugar

1 recipe Pastry Cream-  (2 cups needed)

  • Place ingredients for almond sugar in small saucepan over low heat. Cook until mixture becomes caramel; stir constantly
  • Pour into oiled cookie sheet and set aside until cold. Break into pieces and blend in food processor until powdered. Store in airtight container until ready to mix with pastry cream.
  • Preheat oven to 375 F . Butter and lightly flour cookie sheet.
  • Use rim of 9’ cake pan to trace circle on cookie sheet. Fit pastry bag with large plain round tip and fill with cream puff dough. Tracing marked circle, squeeze out even ring of dough about 1 in wide.
  • Squeeze out two more rings; one on the inside, adjacent to the first ring and the other on top of both rings. Brush rings with beaten egg and sprinkle with sliced almonds. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  • Place cake in oven and bake 45 minutes. Turn heat off and position door ajar; let cake stand another 45 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, prepare whipped cream. Place heavy cream and vanilla in bowl of mixer and beat until firm. Add icing sugar and beat 30 seconds longer:  Refrigerate.
  • To assemble  cake, have all the ingredients ready on counter. Using a long knife with serrated blade, slice lid off cake. Mix 2 cups of pastry cream with ½ cup of almond sugar and fill bottom of cake.

 

  • Using pastry bag, add whipped cream over pastry cream and position lid. Decorate top of cake with rosettes of whipped cream and sprinkle icing sugar , if desired.

Edited by petalsandcoco - 10/15/12 at 11:05am

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post #40 of 243

thank you petals, 

indeed your recipe is a lot simplier and easier than the ones i read.  while i am actually very good at making choux pastry it was the creme chiboust that had gave me the jitters. my understanding of creme chiboust is that it is an italian meringue( normal meringue beaten with liquified sugar heated to the 'hard ball' stage so that it is just slightly candied), then combined with a pastry cream. any idea as to how italian meringue got into a french pastry? i will try your recipe first and let you know....i know this is most probably heresy, but i was thinking hazelnuts instead of the almonds....

again, thank you

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #41 of 243
Hi Joey,

I have a tip for you , whenever you decide to make the cake. When cutting the top off , make sure you don't cut half way , try to cut 1/4 off the top. Once you have the top off , you can pre-cut the cake top into individual servings. Once that is done you can easily place the pieces back on top of your cake for easy service.

Some folks like to peel some of the cake out to make sure it all fits, but its so airy and spongy you can easily get away with just a spoon , lightly patting it down a bit ( making a path) just remove some of the air, this will allow room for the pastry cream, toasted hazelnuts (if you want some crunch or texture).

You are talking about cooked meringue, the Chiboust I know of is basically the pastry cream and meringue (made with egg whites and sugar) done in a standing mixer. You can add melted chocolate to it, if you would prefer, or mango, orange zest or even liqueurs. Any time you mix fruit into it , it becomes a creme plombieres ( there are accents on these two words).

I believe that it's the look of the separate layers that give it its charm. Mind you making a chiboust is nice too.

You can also add gelatin to the chiboust, so it can stand up longer.

Some thoughts....

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post #42 of 243
You can make it with cooked sugar or not, it depends the recipe your making.

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post #43 of 243

Joey,

 

I made this yesterday. A slice of Paris-Brest garnished with an amaretto abricot. You inspired me to make it and it was a beautiful day to bake , boss loved it. Thank you .

 

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post #44 of 243

woohoo petals....even better than i imagined it..thank you for the visual.....i can actually taste it now, looking at yours....but for sure my goose is cooked!!!

yes, this weather is perfect for lots of thingswink.gif

 

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #45 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

Today I made Tarte Tatin. Do ever have days when you start off making something, you feel its going to go bad then all of a sudden, it worked, well today was one of those days. You just never know ...the minute you flip the plate,  if the pie is going to listen to your beating heart which is saying " You better not stick to the bottom or I'm going to ....".

 

 

Wow, this is perfect petals. How could you ever imagine it going wrong? lol.gif Looks mighty tasty. 

post #46 of 243
Thread Starter 

Petals, that is out of this world!

I have never heard, nor seen anything like that before.  Maybe I need to go to Paris (or Montreal wink.gif)

I have a question please?

Did I pipe the dough onto the pan or just use a spoon?

Also, how do I fill?  I might sound a bit naïve but baking is not my forte, but I might give this one a try for the Holidays.

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A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #47 of 243

Got to agree.  Petals that looks soooo good.  Your food is always very beautiful and I'm sure taste as good as it looks.

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post #48 of 243

@ FF: lol lol.gif

 

@ K-girl: There are many patisserie places here that will make it for you upon request. Here is a little guide. Yes, you pipe it on the template (circle on parchment paper) . Can you use a spoon ? Good question, I guess you could. When using a piping bag you will get a more uniform design and you will have basically the same quantity dispersed at all sections of the cake. The third piping on the cake will give it the height that you need when baked.

To fill the cake, use a spoon (if you don't have a pastry bag) . Once the cake is cooked and cooled, slice the cake in half or a little higher than half, spoon out the pastry cream (must be chilled and thick) in all the spaces of the cake evenly, then add the whipped cream on top of that, then place the top back on. This is a type of cake that is best served the same day. Choux pastry is very light.

 

 

“Paris-Brest”

 

@ Joey: I'm glad you like the pic. The only goose that is cooked are the ones my uncle killed when he went hunting a week ago. It's open season here. lol.

I have found that choux works best when the eggs are at room temp and added one at a time till dough has become high gloss.

 

@ Scuba: Thank you, I love to cook, baking is part of it. There are so many areas in the culinary world I would love to master. Ummmm if only I had gone to culinary arts and not nursing....I'm here 13 years and it has been the best. ( I have had my days you know smiles.gif )

 

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post #49 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

@ FF: lol lol.gif

 

Honestly I've seen and tasted my share of tarte tatins, and yours looks absolutely perfect!! Which got me thinking: you being into desserts and flowers and petals and all that, have you ever heard of Alain Passard, the chef of "L'Arpege" in Paris? He invented a tart he calls "bouquet de roses" where the Apples are prepared to look like rose flowers:

 

http://www.alain-passard.com/fr/28-bouquet.html

 

If you google "tarte pommes bouquet de roses" you'll find hundreds of more or less successful renditions of that tart, but I'm convinced you could make a stunning one!! licklips.gif

 

post #50 of 243
FF,

Mignon !!! I promise you that I will attempt to make it. Will I have success ? That's a different story. This is kind of like a food challenge.
I will post the pie when I attempt to make it , be it the good, the bad or the ugly ! biggrin.gif

Petals

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post #51 of 243
Thread Starter 

FF, it’s all in French!

This looks like something that my husband would love, more info please!

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A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #52 of 243

These pictures are incredible!

 

I cheated a little on my diet and had dessert yesterday:  fresh bread with butter, honey and a sprinkle of fleur de sel.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #53 of 243

Last night I made a bread pudding.

 

I took croissants and let them stale. Then mixed 4 eggs, 1 pint of heavy cream, 2 cup  granulated sugar and 1 cup turbinado sugar. 1 oz amaretto and 1 oz  caravella (lemoncello orginale) and one thinly sliced granny smith apple.

 

Dice the croissants, and layer with the apples.

Then pour the cream mix over the bread and allow to soak for 45 minutes.

Then sprinkled a hand full of turbinado sugar over the top (heavily). 

Baked at 350 for 28 minutes.

 

Heres a pic, its not very good, if I had realized how bad it was last night Id have taken more...but now...its all gone.

 

 

post #54 of 243

Dezie, its a versatile dessert and tastes great. Yours looks like it needs to be flown over here.

 

Getting served up today are crème brûlée's. Making alot of these lately, must be the weather, but its their fav.

 

700 Petals.

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post #55 of 243
Thread Starter 
No no , petals, you need to fly that ramekin that's the three one in to ME!

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A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

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post #56 of 243

lol. They are easy to make.

 

Today they will be having Clafouti - raspberry.

 

700Make the batter- place raspberries

 

700baked

 

700Decorate

700Will be served later with a raspberry/condensed milk design and whipped cream.

 

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post #57 of 243
Thread Starter 

I've always wanted to try to make/eat Clafouti !

 

DH and I have been away for the holiday with friends in Northern AZ and they took us to a new place near them, FABULOUS!!

I have always contended that there should be bite sized desserts for us who want a sweet after the meal, but just a little, well, I finally got my wish

 

700

 

Cheese Cake dipped in chocolate and dusted in 24 carat gold

 

700

 

Red Velvet Cake with two small pieces of peanut toffee (behind the cake stack) with an orange sauce on the plate

 

We all (4 of us) had salads for lunch and then shared these two plates, just one bite for each of us

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post #58 of 243

Kgirl, anything dipped in chocolate has my full attention !!!! lol

 

Petals.

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post #59 of 243
Thread Starter 

So, question for the Owner/Operators/Chefs/Pastry Chefs/Cooks, etc ....

WHY is it that when we go out to eat, and it doesn't matter where we are, small or bite sized desserts are rarely offered?

I can count on one hand (and not use each finger) how many restaurants that we've been to that do this.

And yet, if I go to any Kitchen Store for the Home Cook and I can buy mini-dessert serving vessels, entire sets in fact of all shapes and sizes?

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post #60 of 243

Desserts have a much larger role in the meal than in times past, they are an official course now and have become larger as well. Chefs are factoring portion sizes of the previous courses so that the customer is full after the dessert course and not the entree (hence justifying tiny desserts years past). I applaud this as pastry chefs often times save the day when a screw up happens with the hot food or desserts can send a great meal over the top. Nothing would ^*%&( me off more than a awesome meal followed by a generic slice of cheesecake and raspberry sauce. But if that is what you are seeking you will have to actually look for them as opposed to picking a random restaurant and hoping. There are many restaurants that only serve desserts in a tasting setting, and there are many (mostly super high end ones) that serve mini servings. Michael Mina and Jean-Georges for example. Someone like me would be happy to send mini versions of my desserts to the table, unfortunately with a service charge as they may screw up my mise en place, and force me to sacrifice a full serving of those desserts. Try asking your server if they could do something like this. 

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